Issue: 96

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C O N T E N T S

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COLLEGE NEWS

- Seminars for career services candidates in June

- Thirty-five ag alumni plan to attend ISU reunions

- ISU participates in ag science event for Congress

- Lincoln University ag faculty here June 10-12

- Eighteen counties now offer remote diagnosis

- A speedy diagnosis, a harmless moth

- Chaplin represents college in departmental group

- Ag students globetrotting this summer

- Grants will help update student computer labs

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Ag calendar web site: Find a meeting, or add one

INFOGRAZING

- Technology predictions for 2008

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Legacy of agriculture: How we live today

MARGINALIA

- Meet the e-tongue

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C O L L E G E N E W S

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SEMINARS FOR CAREER SERVICES CANDIDATES IN JUNE

Faculty and staff are encouraged to attend seminars by the three candidates for the position of career services director in the College of Agriculture. Each seminar will begin at 4 p.m. in 142 Curtiss Hall. The schedule is: June 8 - Mike Gaul, coordinator, Horticulture Resource and Career Center, ISU Department of Horticulture; June 15 - Michelle Barclay, agriculture academic adviser, Western Illinois University; and June 18 - Gaylan Scofield, system support specialist and adviser, ISU Department of Agricultural Education & Studies. Roger Bruene, the current director, retires at the end of June.

THIRTY-FIVE AG ALUMNI PLAN TO ATTEND ISU REUNIONS

About 35 agriculture alumni plan to attend reunions during ISU’s Alumni Days, June 4-6. More than 200 ISU alumni from the classes of 1948, 1943, 1938 and 1933 will hold reunions. The College of Agriculture will hold receptions for ag alumni on Thursday evening and Friday morning. For more information: Mike Telford, Development Office, 4-3303.

ISU PARTICIPATES IN AG SCIENCE EVENT FOR CONGRESS

ISU was one of 40 universities that participated in the University Agricultural Science Exhibition and Reception on Capitol Hill on May 19. The event, which attracted Congress members and their staff, featured exhibits on how agricultural research serves the nation. ISU’s exhibits detailed efforts in developing new uses for corn and soybeans and providing analyses on food, agricultural and rural policies. ISU's Office of Governmental Relations helped coordinate the event, which was sponsored by the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges.

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY AG FACULTY HERE JUNE 10-12

Agriculture faculty from Lincoln University of Jefferson City, Mo., will visit ISU June 10-12. The visit is part of an Experiment Station diversity program to promote collaborative research and enhance minority recruitment. For more information: Carla Persaud, 4-9376 or cpersaud@iastate.edu.

EIGHTEEN COUNTIES NOW OFFER REMOTE DIAGNOSIS

Almost two years ago, ISU Extension began an initiative to use computer technology to more rapidly respond to Iowans’ insect and plant questions. Today 18 county extension offices have videoconferencing capabilities. Instead of mailing samples of troublesome bugs or ailing plants, clients can send images by e-mail or real-time video to on-campus specialists. Many end up on the computer screens of Donald Lewis, entomology, and Paula Flynn, plant pathology. Specialists in agronomy and horticulture also field questions. About 120 requests for remote diagnosis have been fielded by on-campus experts so far this year.

A SPEEDY DIAGNOSIS, A HARMLESS MOTH

An example of the speed of remote diagnosis (see item above): On Thursday, May 28, entomologist Donald Lewis received an e-mail at 3:08 p.m. from Dan Burkhart at the Fayette County Extension Office. Attached to the message were two digital photos of a moth and two questions from a client -- what is it, and should I be worried? Lewis studied the photos and, at 3:28 p.m., e-mailed an answer: It’s a rosy maple moth, and for northern Iowa, it’s more of a curiosity than a pest. Response time: 20 minutes.

CHAPLIN REPRESENTS COLLEGE IN DEPARTMENTAL GROUP

Mike Chaplin, head of the horticulture department, has been re-elected as the College of Agriculture’s representative on the DEO Cabinet for 1998-2000. Duane Enger, chair of zoology/genetics, chairs the group. The DEO Cabinet is made up of 12 elected department leaders (one from each college and three at-large), plus the provost and faculty senate president. It meets during the academic year to discuss issues of concern to departments and share those perspectives with university administrators.

AG STUDENTS GLOBETROTTING THIS SUMMER

One-hundred-and-one agriculture students are participating in 14 study-abroad programs this summer. Traveling with the students are 10 faculty members and one staff member.

GRANTS WILL HELP UPDATE STUDENT COMPUTER LABS

The college’s technology advancement committee has awarded $25,000 in grants to three departments for student computer projects. The departments of horticulture, agricultural education and studies, and food science and human nutrition will use the funds to update or improve equipment in their computer labs. The funds come from student computer fees and are used to benefit computer-based instruction. The committee received seven proposals for grants.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

June 4-6: ISU Alumni Days.

June 8: Candidate seminar, (Mike Gaul), career services director, 142 Curtiss, 4 p.m.

June 15: Candidate seminar (Michelle Barclay), career services director, 142 Curtiss, 4 p.m.

June 18: Candidate seminar (Gaylan Scofield), career services director, 142 Curtiss, 4 p.m.

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C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

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AG CALENDAR WEB SITE: FIND A MEETING, OR ADD ONE

Wondering when the West Coast Regional Worm Meeting will be held this year? Or the Bubbles in Food International Conference? Check the Agriculture Network Information Center, a web site maintained by the USDA’s National Agricultural Library. The site has a calendar of agricultural meetings, conferences and seminars, many of which emphasize scientific topics. It includes a way to add meeting information. The site: http://www.agnic.org/mtg/index.html

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I N F O G R A Z I N G

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TECHNOLOGY PREDICTIONS FOR 2008

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have come up with a set of predictions about what technology will look like in 10 years, developed with help from "soft" science folks like anthropologists, social scientists and environmentalists. The predictions include: Genetically engineered crops will require less pesticide and fertilizer; smart membranes will improve water quality by removing organic compounds; bioprocessing will use specially cultured microbes and plants to produce environmentally friendly chemicals, fuels and pharmaceuticals; environmental sensors will detect dangerous pathogens in food and monitor air quality; and plastics, paper, beverage containers and ink, as well as cars and computers, will be made more biodegradable or recyclable. (Los Angeles Times, May 11)

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E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

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LEGACY OF AGRICULTURE: HOW WE LIVE TODAY

We need to be careful that while we celebrate our agricultural heritage, we don’t lead the public to believe that the legacy of agriculture is memories of butter churns and horse-drawn plows. The legacy of agriculture is our contemporary way of life that is incomparable in its affluence in human history. May we continue this progress for our future generations. -- Jerry Schickedanz, interim dean, College of Agriculture and Home Economics, New Mexico State University, writing in the spring issue of New Mexico Resources.

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M A R G I N A L I A

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MEET THE E-TONGUE

Pennsylvania State University engineers are working on an electronic device with a sense of taste. They predict that within a few years the "smart tongue" will be cheap and sensitive enough to perform many tasks. Anchored inside milk and juice cartons, the e-tongue could alert a grocery store scanner if the contents weren't fresh. Others might be placed in giant vats at food and chemical factories to monitor the blending of ingredients. The e-tongues have several advantages over traditional chemical sensors -- they're cheap to manufacture; they're wireless; and they're capable of detecting chemical changes without performing chemical reactions. (Scientific American, May)

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