Issue: 9

COLLEGE NEWS

- Strategic plan update

- Brenton Center sign-up

- Project proposal seminar

- Costa Rica seminar/study tour

- Curriculum development projects

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Information facts of life

INFOGRAZING

- Future of family farms

- Contract With America: Cuts ahead?

EXTERNAL VOICES

- A change trying to happen

MARGINALIA

- When in Rome . . .

C O L L E G E N E W S

STRATEGIC PLAN UPDATE

The college's strategic planning committee is nearing completion

of its report. The group will meet on Jan. 10 to review a complete

draft. Later this month the report will be widely distributed

for discussion. Mike Chaplin, 294-3718, chairs the committee.

BRENTON CENTER SIGN-UP

Agriculture faculty can now request to schedule fall classes in

the Brenton Center. Deadline is Feb. 3 -- DEOs have sign-up sheets.

The center has two classrooms: one seats 28, the other 42. Classroom

features include: graphics camera, slide-to-video converter, laser

disk player, VCR, PC computer stations, video pointer, teacher

camera-control system and fiber-optic network camera controls.

The center will help instructors take advantage of the technology.

For more details: see DEO or contact Richard Carter, 294-5904,

rcarter@iastate.edu.

PROJECT PROPOSAL SEMINAR

A seminar on preparing Experiment Station project proposals will

be held noon to 2 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 10, Gold Room, Memorial

Union. Who should attend: early-career faculty, staff who assist

in preparing Experiment Station documentation and faculty who

wish a review of the project proposal process. If you plan to

attend, call Carla Persaud, 294-9376. For more information: Susan

Lamont, 294-3629.

COSTA RICA SEMINAR/STUDY TOUR

The fifth annual seminar/study tour to Costa Rica, March 11-18,

offers opportunities for faculty, staff, alumni and friends to

learn more about tropical agriculture and natural resources, and

expand personal and professional contacts in Costa Rica. The event

includes a rainforest tour and activities at the University of

Costa Rica. It is sponsored by the ISU-Interamerican Center for

Science, Education and Technology. For more details: Mary de Baca,

294-1851, or mdebaca@agcollege.ag.iastate.edu.

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

The university allocated $187,699 to the college last July for

curriculum development. The money provided funds for 18 projects,

including: hiring a computer specialist to help faculty and students

use computer technology in problem-solving courses; improving

services for faculty and students in communications-intensive

courses; completing a statewide assessment of the distance-education

market; and development of an "introduction to environmental

issues" course. The funds are part of a three-year university

fund reallocation program.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

INFORMATION FACTS OF LIFE

The following "Information Facts of Life" are taken

from "Saving IT's Soul: Human-Centered Information Management"

by Thomas Davenport in the Harvard Business Review, March-April

1994:

- There's no such thing as information overload; if information

is really useful, our appetite for it is insatiable.

- To make the most of electronic communications, employees must

first learn to communicate face-to-face.

- Managers prefer to get information from people rather than computers;

people add value to raw information by interpreting and adding

context.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

FUTURE OF FAMILY FARMS

With the average age of family farmers topping 53, the USDA sees

500,000 quitting by the year 2002. Most farms won't stay in the

family. Only 250,000 young people are expected to enter the business,

and bankers are wary of backing new farmers as Washington trims

subsidies. (In Iowa, only a third of farmers expect their children

to take over.) Many operations will merge with neighbors, creating

bigger farms and helping shrink farm numbers by possibly 22 percent

to 1.5 million in a decade or so. (From the Wall Street Journal.)

CONTRACT WITH AMERICA: CUTS AHEAD?

If the "Contract With America" proposed by the new Republican

majority in Congress is implemented, a potential implication may

be less funding for higher education. An analysis of the "Contract"

was compiled in November by three higher-education organizations,

including the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant

Colleges. The "Contract" did not specifically indicate

how $147.9 billion in cuts would be made, but a list of possibilities

includes: elimination of college work-study; increase in interest

payments that students would make on Stafford loans; freeze on

research overhead rates at 90 percent of their present level;

and funding cuts for the National Science Foundation.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

A CHANGE TRYING TO HAPPEN

"When you feel conflict, pain, tension, fear or confusion,

it is a change trying to happen. Many of us settle for chronic

dull pain rather than a brief confrontation with change. The cost

is our flexibility. We become alienated from ourselves and our

stress level rises." From an interview with cultural anthropologist

and business consultant Jennifer James in JD Journal, Number 3,

1994.

M A R G I N A L I A

WHEN IN ROME . . .

The ubiquity of cellular phones in Italy has resulted in a 32-page

courtesy guide published by Telecom Italia that suggests, among

other things: not placing your cellular phone on the table during

lunch "as if it were a piece of bread"; keeping your

voice down during sidewalk conversations; and turning your phone

off while attending the theater. Since this is Italy, it also

suggests having a second telephone for "mischievous"

calls from lovers. (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 12)

Share