Issue: 85

COLLEGE NEWS

- Fall semester graduates honored Saturday

- Ag Council officers chosen for 1998

- New offerings: Study abroad program in China . . .

- . . . and faculty development opportunity in China

- Six faculty make research exchange visits

- Many rivers run through it: A Year of Water poster

- Spanish courses for ag, vet med faculty and staff

- 1998 submission deadlines for Leopold support

- Sixty high school students get microbiology experience

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- A light touch can make presentations memorable

INFOGRAZING

- Federal R&D spending to increase in 1998

- Some projects in federal ag budget vetoed

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Higher education now a mature industry

MARGINALIA

- Ecstatic Yuletide to the planetary constituency

C O L L E G E N E W S

FALL SEMESTER GRADUATES HONORED SATURDAY

About 200 graduates will be recognized Saturday at the college

convocation, which begins at 9:30 a.m. in C.Y. Stephens Auditorium.

Dan Belzer, ag education, will speak and receive the Ag Council's

Outstanding Senior Award. Christopher Janda, forestry, will receive

the Academic Achievement Award; James Romer, horticulture and

ag education, the Distinguished Service Award; and Carissa Cunningham,

agronomy, the Leadership Excellence Award. Doors open at 8:30

a.m. and refreshments precede the convocation.

AG COUNCIL OFFICERS CHOSEN FOR 1998

New Student Ag Council officers have been elected for the new

year. They are: Tonia Hesse, dairy science, president; Shannon

Brinning, animal science, vice president; Patrick Kuehn, ag education,

secretary; and Chris Bowman, agronomy, treasurer. The council

is made up of 46 students from 29 clubs. Faculty advisers are

Jim Kliebenstein, economics, and Joe Burris, agronomy.

NEW OFFERINGS: STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM IN CHINA . . .

The College of Agriculture is sponsoring a

study abroad program to the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences

in Beijing next summer. The six-week program is supported by Cargill,

Inc. Students will take courses in Chinese history, culture, language,

economic reform, agriculture and tai chi. They will visit farms,

agribusinesses and historical and cultural sites. Application

deadline: Jan. 30. For more information: Eduarda Becerra, 4-3972

or ebecerra@iastate.edu.

. . . AND FACULTY DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY IN CHINA

In conjunction with the Chinese study abroad program, the college

is offering a faculty development opportunity in China next June.

Cargill, Inc., is providing support for two ISU faculty members

to spend two and a half weeks at the Chinese Academy for Agricultural

Sciences. Faculty members would develop cooperative projects with

Chinese scientists and serve as advisers to the ISU students.

Interested faculty should submit a letter co-signed by their DEO

to Eric Hoiberg by Jan. 31. Preference will be given to applicants

with at least one previous international experience in a developing

country. For more information: Hoiberg, 4-6614 or hoiberg@iastate.edu

or David Acker, 4-8454 or dacker@iastate.edu.

SIX FACULTY MAKE RESEARCH EXCHANGE VISITS

Six ISU faculty members participated this fall in an Experiment

Station exchange program aimed at strengthening ties with faculty

at historically black land-grant institutions and tribal colleges.

Lloyd Anderson, animal science, visited Fort Valley State. Mike

Kelly, forestry, and John Schafer, agronomy, visited Alabama A&M.

Harold Crawford, agricultural education & studies, visited

North Carolina A&T. Parag Chitnis, biochemistry & biophysics,

and Vinay Dayal, aerospace engineering/engineering mechanics,

visited Tuskegee. For more information: Ramesh Kanwar, 4-4913.

MANY RIVERS RUN THROUGH IT: A YEAR OF WATER POSTER

For that last-minute holiday gift, how about a colorful map of

Iowa's rivers? Last summer at the Iowa State Fair, the College

of Agriculture's "Year of Water" exhibit featured a

large map of Iowa's major rivers titled "Iowa…Many Rivers

Run Through It." The college, Leopold Center and ISU Extension

have produced a poster version of the map, which is available

for $4 from Publications Distribution, 4-5247, and at county extension

offices. Ask for publication Pm-1740.

SPANISH COURSES FOR AG, VET MED FACULTY AND

STAFF

Two Spanish grammar and conversation courses

complemented with Latin American culture will be offered for eight

weeks during spring semester. A beginning level class will be

held every Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-6 p.m., Jan. 20-March 12.

An intermediate level class will be held every Monday and Wednesday,

4:30-6 p.m., Jan. 21-March 11. The courses are supported by the

colleges of agriculture and veterinary medicine and the Institute

for International Cooperation on Animal Biologics. Participants

will pay the cost of their course materials and a $10 application

fee. Registration deadline: Jan. 15. For more information: Eduarda

Becerra, 4-3972 or ebecerra@iastate.edu.

1998 SUBMISSION DEADLINES FOR LEOPOLD SUPPORT

1998 deadlines for submitting proposals to the Leopold Center's

conference and workshop support program are: Jan. 8, March 27,

July 13 and Oct. 7. For more information: Rich Pirog, 4-3711 or

visit the Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/centers/leopold/98conftext.html

SIXTY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS GET MICROBIOLOGY EXPERIENCE

Sixty students from eight high schools attended the Microbiology

Club's annual microbiology workshop on Dec. 5. The

students were introduced to basic microbiology techniques in a

bacterial identification lab, a murder mystery scenario involving

DNA fingerprinting and a virology lab. Four faculty members spoke

on applications of microbiology.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Dec. 20: Graduation. College convocation, 9:30 a.m., C.Y. Stephens.

Dec. 20: Deadline, presentation proposals, 1998 international

conference on animal production systems and the environment, 4-4202.

Jan. 2: Foreign travel grant applications due, 138 Curtiss.

Jan. 15: Deadline, registration for Spanish courses, 4-3972.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

A LIGHT TOUCH CAN MAKE PRESENTATIONS MEMORABLE

Levity isn't appropriate in all circumstances, but presentations

that use a light touch effectively tend to be memorable. Incorporating

unpredictable elements into presentations may be another approach,

writes business communications consultant Jim Endicott in the

December "Presentations" magazine. He tries to incorporate

"pleasant surprises" into his presentations. For some

examples he has used, the article is on the magazine's Web page

at: http://www.presentations.com/mainindexes/departments/speakers.htm

I N F O G R A Z I N G

FEDERAL R&D SPENDING TO INCREASE BY 4 PERCENT

Before adjourning in November, Congress increased research and

development spending by 4 percent for 1998. That included a 0.6

percent increase in agriculture R&D, to $1.55 billion. R&D

funds for the EPA will increase 14.2 percent; DOE, 3.1 percent;

NSF research, 4.7 percent; NSF education, 2.2 percent; and NIH,

7.1 percent. (Science, Nov. 21)

SOME PROJECTS IN FEDERAL AG BUDGET VETOED

Last month President Clinton used his line-item veto to cancel

seven agriculture and natural resources projects from a $28 billion

budget bill for the Agriculture and Interior departments. Duplication

of effort and high expense were two of the reasons the White House

gave for nixing the projects. The projects, which were worth were

worth $8.1 million, included research on dairy cattle nutrition

in Alaska, pesticide-free tomatoes in Ohio, poisonous plants in

Utah and insect-rearing in Mississippi.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

HIGHER EDUCATION NOW A MATURE INDUSTRY

Arthur Levine writes in the fall issue of "Daedalus"

that the decline of government support for higher education is

partly because American higher education is now a mature industry

(with more than 60 percent of all high-school graduates going

on to some form of post-secondary education). Government treats

mature industries very differently than it treats growth industries.

In the case of growth industries, government usually seeks to

help them expand. In the case of mature industries, the government

usually seeks to regulate or control them. With education now

a mature industry, government agencies are pressing institutions

of higher education with hard questions about cost, efficiency,

productivity and effectiveness.

M A R G I N A L I A

ECSTATIC YULETIDE TO THE PLANETARY CONSTITUENCY

The following are the first and last lines from "Christmas

in Academe," a takeoff on "The Night Before Christmas"

that has been making the rounds on the Internet (for the complete

piece, send a note to bmeyer@iastate.edu): 'Twas the nocturnal

segment of the diurnal period preceding the annual Yuletide celebration,

and throughout our place of residence, kinetic activity was not

in evidence among the possessors of this potential, including

that species of domestic rodent known as "Mus musculus"

. . . . But I overheard his parting exclamation, audible immediately

prior to his vehiculation beyond the limits of visibility: "Ecstatic

Yuletide to the planetary constituency, and to the selfsame assemblage,

my sincerest wishes for a salubriously beneficial and gratifying

pleasurable period between sunset and dawn."

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

AG ONLINE

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