Issue: 81

COLLEGE NEWS

- Roy Reiman kicks off entrepreneurial lectures today

- ISU's Ag Week features student-led events, Nov. 3-9

- Reception for Russ Wilson on Oct. 28

- ISU leads Iowa-Ukraine high school exchange

- International seminars on Costa Rica, Yucatan

- Successful Grantsmanship: External funding

- Thirty teams compete in state FFA soil judging event

-Vision 2020 bus trip to DMACC, Southwestern

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Communications tips on Ag Info web site

INFOGRAZING

- Henry A. Wallace on the defense of soil

- More farmers coming to the defense of soil

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Dealing with the monster in Africa -- food security

- Dealing with the Dumpster in America -- food waste

MARGINALIA

- People and places of India captured in photos

C O L L E G E N E W S

ROY REIMAN KICKS OFF ENTREPRENEURIAL LECTURES TODAY

The Reiman Entrepreneurial Lecture Series begins today (Friday),

2-3:30 p.m., Benton Auditorium, Scheman Building. The guest speaker

is Roy Reiman, head of Reiman Publications and a long-time ISU

and College of Agriculture supporter.

ISU'S AG WEEK FEATURES STUDENT-LED EVENTS, NOV. 3-9

Events for Ag Week, Nov. 3-9, will include a panel discussion

on getting started in farming and a tailgater open to ISU ag alumni.

On Nov. 5, "Back to the Farm: Challenges and Opportunities"

will be held in the South Ballroom, Memorial Union, at 7 p.m.

On Nov. 8, an 11 a.m. tailgate gathering will be held before the

ISU-Colorado football game. ISU ag alumni are welcome. For tickets,

call Stacy Konz, 296-1211, by Nov. 5, or visit 119 Kildee or 1126

Agronomy. Other Ag Week events include a volleyball tournament,

mock job interviews, a hay ride at the Ag 450 Farm, a dance, a

campus display of agricultural equipment, and a formal banquet

for faculty, staff and students. All events are sponsored by student

clubs. For more information: Minde Jo Hibma, 233-8872.

RECEPTION FOR RUSS WILSON ON OCT. 28

Development director Russ Wilson has transferred from the College

of Agriculture to the ISU Foundation, where he now develops scholarships

for the university. The foundation is conducting a search for

a new director of development for agriculture. In appreciation

of his eight years of fund-raising for the college, a reception

for Wilson will be held Tuesday, Oct. 28, 142 Curtiss, 9:30-11

a.m.

ISU LEADS IOWA-UKRAINE HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE

A group of Iowa high school students will travel to Ukraine to

study environmental issues in farming in an exchange coordinated

by ISU. The exchange is based on an ongoing ISU environmental

education program with Iowa FFA chapters. The exchange begins

next spring, when 30 students and nine teachers from Kiev will

arrive in Iowa to stay with families in three school districts.

The same number of Iowa students and teachers will fly to Kiev

at the end of May. The exchange is funded by a $190,000 grant

from the U.S. Information Agency. For more information: 4-8454.

INTERNATIONAL SEMINARS ON COSTA RICA, YUCATAN

Two international student seminars will be held next week -- on

Costa Rica, Tuesday, Oct. 28, and on Yucatan, Thursday, Oct. 30.

Both will begin at noon in 8 Curtiss. For more information: Eduarda

Becerra, 4-3972.

SUCCESSFUL GRANTSMANSHIP: EXTERNAL FUNDING

"How to Obtain External Funding for Your Research Program"

is the topic of the next Successful Grantsmanship seminar, 6:30

p.m., Nov. 10, at Holiday Inn Gateway Center. IPRT director Joel

Snow will speak on future directions in funding, followed by presentations

on successful strategies by faculty members in zoology/genetics,

entomology, animal science, CCUR and the Rural Health Center.

Executive associate dean Colin Scanes will conclude with perspectives

on the research funding process. RSVP by Nov. 6 by contacting

Carla Persaud, 4-9376 or cpersaud@iastate.edu.

THIRTY TEAMS COMPETE IN STATE FFA SOIL JUDGING EVENT

Thirty high school teams participated in the 16th annual Iowa

FFA Soil Career Development Event on Oct. 18. Agronomist Gerald

Miller coordinated the contest and extension field specialist

Virgil Schmitt handled scoring. Sponsors included ISU Extension

and the ISU agronomy department. Soil pits for the contest were

located at ISU's Rhodes Research Farm. Montezuma, Emmetsburg,

Orient, Goose Lake and Denison qualified for the International

Land Judging Career Development Event in Oklahoma next May.

VISION 2020 BUS TRIP TO DMACC AND SOUTHWESTERN

Sign up by Oct. 31 for the next Vision 2020 bus trip to community

colleges. The Nov. 6 trip will visit Des Moines Area Community

College, Ankeny, and Southwestern Community College, Creston.

To register, contact the 2020 office: 4-2092, or kklind@iastate.edu.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Oct. 29: Course offering materials (for schedule of classes) for

next summer session due, 23 Curtiss.

Nov. 3: College and university award nominations deadline, 130

Curtiss.

Nov. 3-9: Ag Week.

Nov. 4: Changing Expectations of Faculty Roles and Responsibilities,

21st Century Land-Grant Universities seminar series downlink,

116 Pearson, 10:30 a.m., 4-2092.

Nov. 6: Vision 2020 bus trip to DMACC, Southwestern, 4-2496.

Nov. 10: Successful Grantsmanship: How to Obtain External Funding

for Your Research Program (RSVP by Nov. 6), 4-9376.

Nov. 11: Ag Career Day, Memorial Union.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

COMMUNICATIONS TIPS ON AG INFO WEB SITE

Giving a speech in the near future? Thinking about writing a letter

to the editor? Tips and advice about those and other communications

opportunities can be found on Ag Information's Web site. The speech-making

information includes a checklist and outline forms to help in

preparing. There are tips about how to be an effective spokesperson

when a reporter calls. Writing letters, chairing meetings and

serving as an emcee also are covered. The Communication Skills

home page is: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/communication.html

Contact Ag Info, at 4-5616, if you have questions.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

HENRY A. WALLACE ON THE DEFENSE OF SOIL

Last week, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Wallace Genetic

Foundation established the Henry A. Wallace Endowed Chair for

Sustainable Agriculture in the College of Agriculture. Here's

what Wallace, then U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, had to say in

1939 about the importance of conserving natural resources: "On

its lands and natural resources a nation will rise or fall. Our

nation has come to a stage where conservation of our basic wealth

is vital. Upon the conservation of what we have today, our civilization

may project itself into the future with continual progress in

democracy and high standards of living."

MORE FARMERS COMING TO THE DEFENSE OF SOIL

For the first time, U.S. farmers are planting more acres using

conservation tillage than traditional intensive tillage. The Conservation

Technology Information Center reports conservation tillage systems

accounted for 110 million acres of the 295 million cropland acres

planted this year. Conventional intensive tillage acres totaled

108 million acres. Reduced-till accounted for the rest of the

cropland. Iowa was the top state in conservation tillage acres

in soybeans and ranked second in corn.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

DEALING WITH THE MONSTER IN AFRICA -- FOOD SECURITY

"The food security problem in Africa is a monster, and sometimes

it feels like we're dealing with it with a ping-pong paddle. But

I noted two encouraging signs from today's symposium. One, there's

greater collaboration among groups with the expertise to address

the problem, including closer relationships with the private sector.

And two, U.S. AID plans to focus more attention on Africa. If

that's where the monster problem is, that's where government resources

should be focused." -- A.S. Clausi, at the conclusion of

last week's World Food Prize Symposium on food security in sub-Saharan

Africa. Clausi is past president of the Institute of Food Technologists

Foundation and a member of the prize's Council of Advisors.

DEALING WITH THE DUMPSTER IN AMERICA -- FOOD WASTE

The USDA estimates that 96 billion pounds of the 356 billion pounds

of food available for human consumption in America is lost or

wasted each year. The lion's share is thrown out by restaurants,

commercial food services and families. At a national summit on

gleaning and food recovery, Robert Hahn of the American Enterprise

Institute suggested that waste is a sign of societal success rather

than failure. "If ever there was a non-issue this is it.

The primary reason so much gets tossed is that America has the

cheapest food in the world." (New York Times, Sept. 15)

M A R G I N A L I A

PEOPLE AND PLACES OF INDIA CAPTURED IN PHOTOS

"In High Places," a collection of photos by assistant

professor of entomology Bryony Bonning, is on display through

Nov. 4 in the Pioneer Room, Memorial Union. Bonning took the photos

of the people, places and cultures of northern India while hiking

in the Himalayas.

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