Issue: 80

COLLEGE NEWS

- Come to the World Food Prize award ceremony Oct. 16

- Other World Food Prize activities with links to ISU

- Ukrainian ag president to speak Oct. 15

- Exhibit shows ag contributions of Ukrainian immigrants

- Record number of employers expected for Ag Career

Day

- Open house for new ventilation research lab

- New professional development fund for ag merit staff

- New college awards for teamwork and research

- Students share international experiences in seminars

- More than 8,000 visit ISU research farms this year

- Hort Club apple sale at Reiman Gardens through Oct.

26

- Autumn Festival raises funds for children's garden

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Surplus problem nouns clog sentence environment

INFOGRAZING

- World Food Day downlink Oct. 16

- Local resource conservation meeting Oct. 14

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Penalties for everything but unsafe food

MARGINALIA

- She forgot that the fields have ears

C O L L E G E N E W S

COME TO THE WORLD FOOD PRIZE AWARD CEREMONY OCT. 16

There's still room in vans reserved for ISU faculty and staff

who wish to attend the 1997 World Food Prize award ceremony on

Thursday, Oct. 16, at the Des Moines Civic Center. The 4 p.m.

award ceremony, which is open to the public, will include an acceptance

address by the winners, who will be named Oct. 14 in Washington,

DC; a performance by singer Simon Estes; and remarks by American

Red Cross president Elizabeth Dole and Nobel Peace Prize winner

Norman Borlaug. To reserve a van seat, call 4-0706 by 10 a.m.,

Wednesday, Oct. 15.

OTHER WORLD FOOD PRIZE ACTIVITIES WITH LINKS TO ISU

On Friday, Oct. 17, students from 27 Iowa high schools will tour

agricultural sites on campus as part of the World Food Prize Youth

Institute. On Saturday, Oct. 18, a group of 30 African graduate

students will be on campus following their participation in Friday's

World Food Prize Symposium on food security in sub-Saharan Africa.

UKRAINIAN AG UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT TO SPEAK OCT. 15

Dmytro Melnichuk, president of the National Agricultural University

in Kiev, will speak on the reform of agricultural education in

Ukraine at 3 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 15, in the Gold Room, Memorial

Union. For more information: 4-8454.

EXHIBIT SHOWS AG CONTRIBUTIONS OF UKRAINIAN IMMIGRANTS

Coinciding with Dmytro Melnichik's visit (see above) is an exhibit

on the contributions that Ukrainian immigrants have made to American

agriculture. The exhibit, produced by the Embassy of Ukraine and

the USDA's National Agricultural Library, may be viewed in the

Memorial Union's Browsing Library on Thursday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m.

- 6 p.m. For more information: 4-8454.

RECORD NUMBER OF EMPLOYERS EXPECTED FOR AG CAREER DAY

A record number of businesses and government agencies are expected

at Ag Career Day on Nov. 11. Roger Bruene, Career Services director,

said the strong economy has created an employment market that

is as strong as he's seen in 20 years. Last year 145 employers

recruited college students for full-time positions, summer employment

and internships. Ag Career Day will be held 9:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

in the Great Hall, South Ballroom, Sun Room and Oak Room in the

Memorial Union. For more information: 4-4725.

OPEN HOUSE FOR NEW VENTILATION RESEARCH LAB

An open house and demonstration will be held 2-5 p.m., Oct. 24,

for the Air Dispersion Laboratory, a new facility on the Agronomy

and Ag & Biosystems Engineering Research Farm. The lab simulates

livestock production conditions, providing companies with the

means to evaluate entire ventilation systems. Research may help

to develop systems that save energy, and that create a healthier,

more productive and more comfortable environment for animals.

To get to the lab, take U.S. 30 west of Ames to V Avenue, turn

left and go a quarter mile south. For more information: Steve

Hoff, 4-6180, or Jay Harmon, 4-0554.

NEW PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUND FOR AG MERIT STAFF

The College of Agriculture has created a $5,000 fund for merit

employees who wish to attend professional development programs.

Departments are asked to match the requested amount. For more

information, contact your DEO or director, or call 4-2518.

NEW COLLEGE AWARDS FOR TEAMWORK AND RESEARCH

Two new College of Agriculture honors will be awarded this academic

year. The College of Agriculture Team Award recognizes a team

of faculty/staff that has made a significant contribution to research,

extension or teaching The College of Agriculture Outstanding Achievement

in Research Award recognizes achievement in research, scholarship

or creative activity. A packet of nomination forms for 1997-98

College of Agriculture and university awards is available in departmental

and area extension offices. Many have a Nov. 3 deadline. For more

information, see the packet or call 4-6614.

STUDENTS SHARE INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN SEMINARS

The International Agriculture Seminar Series focuses on international

trips that will take place during 1997-98. The next seminar is

on Costa Rica, and will be held noon to 1 p.m., Oct. 28, in Room

8, Brenton Center, Curtiss Hall. Students who traveled to the

countries in previous years will share their experiences. For

more information: Eduarda Becerra, 4-3972.

MORE THAN 8,000 VISIT ISU RESEARCH FARMS THIS YEAR

ISU's Research and Demonstration Farms attracted 8,365 visitors

during 1997. That number includes field day attendance and visitors

during other times. One final field day will be held in November

at the McNay farm. The Armstrong/Neely-Kinyon farms in southwest

Iowa had the most visitors -- 2,251.

HORT CLUB APPLE SALE AT REIMAN GARDENS THROUGH OCT. 26

The Horticulture Club's apple sale at Reiman Gardens continues

through Oct. 26 on Fridays, 4-6 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

and Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

AUTUMN FESTIVAL RAISES FUNDS FOR CHILDREN'S

GARDEN

About $13,000 was raised at last month's Reiman Gardens Autumn

Festival. The funds will be used to help develop the new children's

garden.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Oct. 15: Dmytro Melnichuk, National Agricultural University, Ukraine,

presentation, 3 p.m., Gold Room, Memorial Union.

Oct. 16: World Food Prize award ceremony, Des Moines, 4-0706.

Oct. 16: Exhibit, Ukrainian Americans' contributions to agriculture,

Browsing Library, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Oct. 16: World Food Day downlink, 116 Pearson, 4-5906.

Oct. 17: Deadline, Dean of Agriculture's International Research

Grants, 4-8493.

Oct. 28: International Ag Seminar Series on Costa Rica, 8 Curtiss,

noon.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

SURPLUS PROBLEM NOUNS CLOG SENTENCE ENVIRONMENT

Some nouns are frequently added to phrases without adding any

meaning or precision, says Edmond Weiss in "Writing Remedies:

Practical Exercises for Technical Writing." Weiss says the

most serious offenders to watch for are: approach, area, concept,

condition, environment, location, problem, situation and type.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

WORLD FOOD DAY DOWNLINK ON OCT. 16

A satellite downlink of the 14th annual World Food Day event from

Washington, DC, will be held Thursday, Oct. 16, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.,

in 116 Pearson. Participants may phone in questions during the

session, which will focus on progress since last year's Rome summit

on food security. To register, contact Kim Greder, 4-5906, or

x1greder@exnet.iastate.edu.

LOCAL RESOURCE CONSERVATION MEETING OCT. 14

The Natural Resources Conservation Service will hold a public

meeting Oct. 14 to explore interest in forming a Resource Conservation

and Development (RC&D) office in Story and surrounding counties.

The RC&D program helps communities improve their economic

well-being and quality of life through the wise use and development

of natural resources. Currently, Iowa has 10 RC&D councils

covering 56 counties. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. at the State

Bank Meeting Room, 1025 6th Street, Nevada. For more information:

Erwin Klaas, eklaas@iastate.edu.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

PENALTIES FOR EVERYTHING BUT UNSAFE FOOD

"This enforcement gap gets downright absurd. We can use fines

to protect farmers and ranchers from unfair trading practices.

Abuse a circus elephant, sell a cat without a license, market

a potato that's too small, keep bad records on watermelons, fail

to report to the onion committee -- fine, fine, fine, fine, fine.

Yet if you produce unsafe food -- the only one of these items

that puts people's lives at stake -- there is no civil penalty."

USDA Secretary Dan Glickman, asking the Senate Agriculture Committee

to beef up the agency's meat inspection enforcement powers. (New

York Times, Oct. 9)

M A R G I N A L I A

SHE FORGOT THAT THE FIELDS HAVE EARS

Photojournalist Tina Hager spent a summer focusing on what she

considers the most American -- and photogenic -- vegetable there

is: corn. While most folks are quite willing to have fun with

their favorite grain, some take corn very seriously. No one was

more intense about corn than the cops in Creston, Iowa. "I

was in a field doing a macro picture of a stalk, and a policeman

stopped me," Hager said. "Then I was interrogated by

several police. They probably thought I was some sort of international

corn spy." (Life, September)

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