Issue: 78

COLLEGE NEWS

- Attend Sept. 17 open forum with President Jischke

- National search is on for associate dean-extension

- Nobel Prize winner to speak at B&B symposium

- ISU Agricultural Foundation turns 60

- Reiman Gardens celebrates its second year

- Garden field days attract more than 500

- Crowds flock to Agronomy Day

- 1997-98 chairs of college standing committees

- Deadline Oct. 17 for International Research Grants

- Request for proposals: Iowa Soybean Promotion Board

- Dates set for AgComm meetings

- Land-grant issues discussed in downlinked series

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- A call for clarity in journal paper writing

INFOGRAZING

- After-hours counselor available for student crises

- Nineteen fall courses offered via distance education

- Many inquisitive visitors at the fair

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Student motivation for those first crucial weeks

MARGINALIA

- Warning: Reading this prose may be a precursor of

plasma energy collapse

C O L L E G E N E W S

ATTEND SEPT. 17 OPEN FORUM WITH PRESIDENT

JISCHKE

Agriculture faculty, staff and students are

encouraged to attend an open meeting with President Jischke on

Wednesday, Sept. 17, 3:10 to 4 p.m. in the CCUR Theatre (1951

Food Sciences). The meeting is part of the President Jischke's

annual daylong visit with college personnel and students.

NATIONAL SEARCH IS ON FOR ASSOCIATE DEAN-EXTENSION

Nov. 1 is the application deadline for the

position of associate dean for extension in the College of Agriculture.

The search committee -- six faculty members, four staff members

and a farmer -- is chaired by Willis Goudy, chair of sociology.

Wendy Wintersteen has been interim associate dean since August

1995. For more information: Goudy, 4-8311 or wjgoudy@iastate.edu.

NOBEL PRIZE WINNER TO SPEAK AT B&B SYMPOSIUM

Stanley Cohen, winner of the 1986 Nobel Prize

in physiology and medicine, will speak at the Department of Biochemistry

& Biophysics' ninth annual Growth Factor and Signal Transduction

Symposium, Sept. 25-28. The topic of this year's international

symposium is epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling.

Cohen, a Vanderbilt University biochemist, and Rita Levi-Montalcini

shared the Nobel Prize for their discovery of EGF. For more information

on the symposium: 4-7978 or gfst@molebio.iastate.edu, or see the

Web site at: http://molebio.iastate.edu/~gfst/homepg.htm

ISU AGRICULTURAL FOUNDATION TURNS 60

The ISU Agricultural Foundation observes its

60th anniversary with a reception and dinner today (Friday). The

foundation's mission is to help beginning farmers and support

the College of Agriculture. This year the foundation has awarded

$52,000 in scholarships to ag students. Organized in 1937, the

foundation was made possible by gifts from C.R. Musser, a Muscatine

banker. Musser's daughter, Marion Musser Lloyd, will attend today's

activities, along with past and present foundation trustees.

REIMAN GARDENS CELEBRATES ITS SECOND YEAR

It's been two years since the Reiman Gardens were dedicated, a

"birthday" that was observed at the gardens this week.

This year the gardens displayed more than 18,000 annual plants

and more than 100 species of perennials. Last year more than 100

organized tours were given, with a similar number so far this

year. More than 30 couples have married in the gardens.

GARDEN FIELD DAYS ATTRACT MORE THAN 500

This summer, 531 people attended evening field

days for the home demonstration gardens at seven ISU Research

& Demonstration Farms. The gardens are used to evaluate new

varieties and techniques used in home vegetable and flower gardens.

CROWDS FLOCK TO AGRONOMY DAY

Agronomy Day attracted 1,110 visitors to the

Agronomy/Ag Engineering Research Farm on Thursday. Of that number,

260 were high school students.

1997-98 CHAIRS OF COLLEGE STANDING COMMITTEES

Chairs of the college's standing committees

this year are: Joe Colletti, curriculum; Paul Brackelsberg, academic

affairs; Jim Kliebenstein, recruitment; Bruce Menzel, minority

programs; James Dyer, professional development; Howard Tyler,

honors program; Richard Shibles, faculty awards; Gail Nonnecke,

student awards/scholarships; Russ Mullen, transfer/articulation;

Ed Braun, plant health and protection; Ken Holscher, BS-Off Campus

and Master of Agriculture supervisory; and Gaylan Scofield, technology

advancement.

DEADLINE OCT. 17 FOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH

GRANTS

The Dean of Agriculture's International Research

Grants Program aims to expand and strengthen international research

collaborations on problems of mutual interest to Iowans and cooperating

countries. Deadline for proposals is Oct. 17. Applications have

been sent to departments, or check the Web site at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/international/faculty/dean_grants.html

For more information: Elena Polouchkina, 4-8493 or elenap@iastate.edu.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: IOWA SOYBEAN PROMOTION

BOARD

The ISPB will provide more than $3 million

for research that expands soybean utilization and improves soybean

profitability. Project preproposals are due Oct. 31. See the college

Web site for submission instructions: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/iaexp/rfp/

DATES SET FOR AGCOMM MEETINGS

A series of AgComm meetings has been scheduled

to help agriculture faculty incorporate communication skills development

into their courses. AgComm is the college's communication-across-the-curriculum

program. The first session, on Oct. 1, will be an overview for

new teaching faculty and teaching assistants. It will be held

noon to 1:30 p.m. in 106 Curtiss, with lunch served. Future meetings

will be held Oct. 22 and Nov. 19 in 142 Curtiss; and Jan. 27,

Feb. 17 and an April date in 8 Curtiss. For more information:

Robert Martin, AgComm coordinator, 4-0896, or Rebecca Burnett,

AgComm consultant in the English department, 4-5654.

LAND-GRANT ISSUES DISCUSSED IN DOWNLINKED

SERIES

Vision 2020 is sponsoring a downlink of "21st

Century Land-Grant Universities: Action on Issues," a series

of teleconferences originating at Clemson University. The next

seminar is Oct. 2; others follow once a month through February.

All run from 10:30 a.m. to noon in 116 Pearson. Preregistration

is suggested. The sessions will be videotaped. For more information:

4-2092 or visit the Web site: http://www.adec.edu/clemson/main.html

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Sept. 15: Habla usted espanol? Deadline, Spanish Language/Latin

American Culture class registration, 4-3972.

Sept. 17: Open meeting with President Jischke, 1951 Food Sciences.

Sept. 25-28: 9th annual Growth Factor and Signal Transduction

Symposium, 4-7978.

Oct. 1: AgComm seminar for new teaching faculty and TAs, 106 Curtiss,

noon.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

A CALL FOR CLARITY IN JOURNAL PAPER WRITING

In an effort to improve scientific writing,

a group of physicists and journal editors plans to present journal

paper submission guidelines to the American Institute of Physics

publication board. The guidelines will recommend that journal

editors "make clarity of presentation 'an (explicit) condition

of acceptance of an article,' that abstracts be made more generally

intelligible and that the best-written articles receive special

recognition." Martin Blume, editor-in-chief at the American

Physical Society, said, "The idea is to make a small dent

in this loss of general understanding." (From Science, Aug.

15.)

I N F O G R A Z I N G

AFTER-HOURS COUNSELOR AVAILABLE FOR STUDENT

CRISES

After regular business hours, ISU Student

Counseling Service has counselors available for crisis calls involving

students, including suicidal or traumatic situations, or similar

events where a counselor's advice or presence is critically needed.

Michelle Clark is the after-hours liaison for the College of Agriculture.

Each department has received details about the program.

NINETEEN FALL COURSES OFFERED VIA DISTANCE

EDUCATION

Nineteen courses in the college are being

delivered via distance education this semester. Nine are offered

on the ICN; four on the Web; five on videotape; and one on satellite.

The courses are in genetics, microbiology, zoology, agricultural

education, agronomy, biochemistry & biophysics, sociology,

horticulture, economics and animal science.

MANY INQUISITIVE VISITORS AT THE FAIR

Last month, almost 150 visitors to the college's

state fair exhibit wrote down questions that they wanted answered.

Some wanted information on well-water testing and soil testing.

Some asked for water quality education materials. Some wanted

to know how to control grasshoppers and water lilies. Others asked

about the best grasses or trees to use for stabilizing stream

banks. Several asked for information on attending ISU. All requests

for information were filled or forwarded to the appropriate persons.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

STUDENT MOTIVATION FOR THOSE FIRST CRUCIAL WEEKS

The percentage of college freshmen who drop out or transfer during

their first year is at an all-time high: nearly 27 percent, according

to ACT Inc. That's why the hottest new market for motivational

speakers is colleges. In hiring the speakers, colleges hope to

dissuade students from dropping out or transferring. "It

helps us keep students in those first few weeks, and those are

crucial weeks," said Linda Perez, coordinator of academic

services at North Park University in Chicago. "It gets them

out of their dorm rooms after their parents have left, so they're

not in there crying all alone." (Wall Street Journal, Sept.

4)

M A R G I N A L I A

WARNING: READING THIS PROSE MAY BE A PRECURSOR

OF PLASMA ENERGY COLLAPSE

Some scientists and editors want to make scientific

writing easier to understand (see "Communications Kiosk").

To illustrate the problem, the following opening sentence of a

physics journal paper was cited in the Aug. 15 issue of Science:

"The need to obtain adequate ELMy H-mode energy confinement

simultaneous with operation near the neoclassical tearing mode

beta-limit and at/above the Greenwald density limit suggests that

careful optimization of plasma performance will be required to

obtain the desired fusion power performance, and that 'active

means' to control or inhibit the onset of neoclassical tearing

mode activity -- a common precursor of plasma energy collapse

or disruption in present experiments operating near the beta and/or

density limits -- will be required."

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