Issue: 7

COLLEGE NEWS

- Interviews soon for two positions

- Convocation for graduating students

- Financial aid for ag students

- Reminder to advisers

- Know students who plan to farm?

INFOGRAZING

- Re: The paperless society

- Re: The paperless society II

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Life beyond academe for new Ph.D.'s

MARGINALIA

- Important, but boring

C O L L E G E N E W S

INTERVIEWS SOON FOR TWO POSITIONS

Interviews for the executive associate dean and the director for

international programs should be set after the holidays. Each

search committee now has a short list of candidates. The two positions

are part of the new College of Agriculture administrative structure,

which will be in place July 1, 1995.

CONVOCATION FOR GRADUATING STUDENTS

Eighty agriculture undergraduates (of approximately 160) have

indicated that they will participate in the College of Agriculture

convocation and reception prior to the fall commencement ceremony.

The convocation will begin at 10 a.m., Dec. 17 in C.Y. Stephens

Auditorium. Two faculty members from each department will assist

in the recognition ceremony. There will be a brief speech by a

representative of the students. Approximately 650 friends and

family members are expected to attend.

FINANCIAL AID FOR AG STUDENTS

About 90 percent of ISU students majoring in agriculture qualified

for merit- and need-based financial aid last year, according to

the financial aid office. Of those, 72 percent received aid from

all sources, which included scholarships, loans, grants and work

study. Last year the college awarded $185,231 in undergraduate

scholarships and departments awarded $109,275 in undergrad scholarships.

Scholarships are one of the college's top fund-raising priorities.

Scholarship endowments have increased to $2.1 million this year

compared with $372,887 five years ago.

A REMINDER TO ADVISERS

Encourage students to take financial aid forms home during winter

break and to get them in early, even if they have to estimate

income. More students are meeting eligibility requirements and

there's no new money. Applications have been sent to all students

who applied last year -- to the address listed on student's last

application. They also can pick up forms in Room 12, Beardshear.

KNOW STUDENTS WHO PLAN TO FARM?

Encourage seniors and juniors who plan on entering family-farm

operations after graduation to check out Ag-Link/College to Farm

Transition. The program, a result of recommendations from the

College of Agriculture's Young Farmer Task Force, features workshops

for students and their families, to be held in January and March.

Enrollment is limited. Registration deadline is Jan. 4. For more

information: Lisa Breja, Department of Agricultural Education

and Studies, 294-4810 or lbreja@iastate.edu.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

RE: THE PAPERLESS SOCIETY

In 1985-86, ISU's copy centers printed 35 million pages of copy.

In 1993-94, the total was 54 million. Add to that total, of course,

the uncounted/uncountable copies made by photocopy machines found

in many departments and the paper churned out by computer printers.

In the future, it may be possible to print backed, collated, stapled

copies at 30 pages per minute without leaving the computer.

RE: THE PAPERLESS SOCIETY II

According to a recent survey by the U.S. Department of Education,

84 percent of America's teachers consider only one type of information

technology absolutely "essential": a photocopier with

an adequate paper supply. (From the Nov. 6 Telecommunications

Policy Review.)

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

LIFE BEYOND ACADEME FOR NEW PH.D.'S

"Tremendous opportunities are available for Ph.D.'s willing

to consider a non-academic career. First, however, graduate students,

faculty members and university administrators have to commit themselves

to the idea that there is life outside the academy, and that its

social value and personal satisfaction may well be as great as

-- or greater than -- those of life within the thinning groves

of academe." (From an article by Debra Hotaling, Oct. 12th

Chronicle for Higher Education. She lists examples of actions

that grad students, faculty and administrators can take.)

M A R G I N A L I A

IMPORTANT, BUT BORING

". . . Not everybody agrees on what 'boring' means. For example,

Person A might believe that collecting decorative plates is boring,

whereas Person B might find this to be a fascinating hobby. Who's

to say which person is correct? I am. Person A is correct. Plate-collecting

is boring. In fact, hobbies of any kind are boring except to people

who have the same hobby . . . The New Age is boring, and so are

those puzzles where you try to locate all the hidden words. Agriculture

is important, but boring." (From humorist Dave Barry's Nov.

21 newspaper column.)

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