Issue: 60

COLLEGE NEWS

- Spring semester convocation to be held Jan. 16

- New chair for food science & human nutrition

- Updated college desk directory available

- Communications advisers in each department

- Ag Ambassadors making recruitment visits

- Global food needs the theme of '97 ag forum

- New Web site for Ag Online newsletter

- Other online internal newsletters in college

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Get a grip . . . on the second or third drafts

INFOGRAZING

- Higher education: Healthy return on state dollars

- Higher education: Research to replace shrinking dollars?

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Revere nature by getting to know it

- A speaking acquaintance with trees

MARGINALIA

- I get a charge out of you

C O L L E G E N E W S

SPRING SEMESTER CONVOCATION TO BE HELD JAN. 16

The College of Agriculture's spring semester convocation will

be held at 4 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 16, in the Curtiss Hall auditorium.

Faculty and staff who received awards or honors during the past

year will be recognized.

NEW CHAIR FOR FOOD SCIENCE & HUMAN NUTRITION

Diane Birt has been named chair of the Department of Food Science

and Human Nutrition. She will begin her new duties on July 1.

Birt is a professor at the Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer

at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. She also

is a professor in biochemistry and in pharmaceutical sciences

there. From 1991-94, she was interim chair of the medical center's

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Birt was an

assistant professor of human nutrition at ISU from 1975-76. Pamela

White has served as interim chair of the department since September

1995, when chair Wayne Bidlack started a new job in California.

UPDATED COLLEGE DESK DIRECTORY AVAILABLE

Ag Information has updated the College of Agriculture desk directory

and sent copies to each department's communication adviser. The

one-page directory lists college, department and center administrators

and support staff, along with phone numbers and e-mail addresses.

Also listed are university administration, extension administration,

other college deans and miscellaneous offices on and off campus.

To get a copy, contact your department's communications adviser

(see next item for their names). If you aren't connected to a

department and would like a copy, contact Marty Behrens, Ag Information,

4-5616 or behrens@iastate.edu.

COMMUNICATIONS ADVISERS IN EACH DEPARTMENT

Advisers in each department are helping the College of Agriculture

improve internal communications. They are: Barbara Kalsem, ag

& biosystems engineering; Linda Drennan, ag education and

studies; Martha Isaacson, agronomy; Lyn Van De Pol, animal ecology;

Renee Knosby, animal science; Kathy Wiederin (interim), biochemistry

& biophysics; John Schlenker, economics; Donald Lewis, entomology;

Judy Strand, food science & human nutrition; Rose Turner,

forestry; Kim Gaul, horticulture; Anita Nimtz, microbiology, immunology

& preventive medicine; Mary Jo Vivian, plant pathology; Ramona

Wierson, sociology; Mary Johnson, zoology/genetics; and Marty

Behrens, college administration.

AG AMBASSADORS MAKING RECRUITMENT VISITS

This semester break, and over spring break, 30 students are scheduled

to visit 62 Iowa high schools and one Minnesota high school to

let students know about the advantages of attending ISU and the

College of Agriculture. Ag Student Ambassadors talk about career

opportunities and the college's programs and classes; show a college

recruitment video; and distribute brochures. Ag Ambassador advisers

are Mark Hanna, ag and biosystems engineering extension program

specialist, and Karen Bolluyt, director of college relations.

GLOBAL FOOD NEEDS THE THEME OF '97 AG FORUM

The 1997 National Forum for Agriculture, March 3-4 in Des Moines,

will focus on the world's changing food needs. The forum, "Food

in a Borderless World: A Dilemma of Politics, Money and Beliefs,"

is organized by the Center for Agriculture and Rural Development

and the Food and Agriculture Committee of the Greater Des Moines

Chamber of Commerce Federation. For more information: 4-6257.

NEW WEB SITE FOR AG ONLINE NEWSLETTER

Ag Online has a new Web site. Issues are posted the day they are

e-mailed. The latest 10 issues are listed, and there's a link

to the back issues. You can get to the site from Ag Information's

home page: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

OTHER ONLINE INTERNAL NEWSLETTERS IN COLLEGE

A quick search found the following online internal newsletters

in the college. Are there others? Drop a note to bmeyer@iastate.edu

with the newsletter's address.

Agronomy Dept. Newsletter: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/departments/agronomy/news/agronnews.html

B&B Bulletin Board Newsletter:

http://molebio.iastate.edu/bbhtml/bullbrd.htm

Horticulture Dept. Newsletter:

http://www.ag.iastate.edu/departments/hort/Frames/news/nframe.html

Plant Pathology Newsletter:

http://www.exnet.iastate.edu/Pages/plantpath/pp-news.html

Sociology Weekly Newsletter:

http://socserver.soc.iastate.edu/news.html

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Jan. 6: First-quarter deadline, Leopold Center conference and

workshop grant applications, 4-3711

Jan. 6: Foreign travel grant applications due, 138 Curtiss

Jan. 13: Spring semester begins

Jan. 16: College of Agriculture spring convocation, Curtiss Hall,

4 p.m.

Jan. 28: Spanish grammar/conversation courses for ag-vet med faculty

begin, 4-3972.

Feb. 3: Nominations deadline, Floyd Andre and Henry A. Wallace

awards, 134 Curtiss; and Excellence in International Agriculture

award, 104 Curtiss

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

GET A GRIP . . . ON THE SECOND OR THIRD DRAFT

Writing first drafts can be painful. But those kinds of messes

aren't always bad, according to Anne Lamott, author of "Bird

by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life." She writes:

"Clutter is wonderfully fertile ground -- you can still discover

new treasures under all those piles, clean things up, edit things

out, fix things, get a grip. Tidiness suggests that something

is as good as it's going to get. Tidiness makes me think of held

breath, of suspended animation, while writing needs to breathe

and move." Keep that in mind during subsequent drafts.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

HIGHER EDUCATION: HEALTHY RETURN ON STATE DOLLARS

In a front-page item, the Wall Street Journal noted that "a

state's return on higher education may beat a 30-year treasury

bond." The Journal was reporting on a University of Illinois

study, which found that the Illinois state government receives

an inflation adjusted 6 percent return on each college student

it invests money in. Running a cost-benefit study, UI researcher

W. Randall Kangas compared the state's average 1994 per-student

cost -- $5,096 -- with the extra income a male college graduate

is expected to earn during his lifetime because of his undergraduate

degree --$1,028,463. Kangas said Illinois eventually collects

$4.31 in income tax revenue for each dollar invested in UI undergraduates.

(Wall Street Journal, Nov. 14)

HIGHER EDUCATION: RESEARCH TO REPLACE SHRINKING DOLLARS?

A report by Toronto-based Mercer Management Consulting Inc. says

that as institutional budgets shrink and outside grants become

scarcer, universities have more incentive to commercialize the

results of scientific research. It's an "enormous opportunity"

to replace diminishing internal budgets, the report says. The

report also goes on to say that it takes 6,000 scientific findings

to generate a single successful new venture. (Investor's Business

Daily, Dec. 30)

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

REVERE NATURE BY GETTING TO KNOW IT

In her "Cuttings" column in the Dec. 8 New York Times,

Anne Raver writes about learning the names of tree species: "Maybe

this need to name things comes from getting older. Maybe it's

a way of feeling more connected to a place, like being able to

say, 'Hi, Al,' to the security guard in the lobby, rather than

just nodding to a nameless face. And once you know the name of

something, or someone -- and trees, the ancients believed, were

full of spirits -- you begin to want to know more....It's not

all that different with a plant....I think the only way to get

back to revering nature is to get to know it, from the state of

your mud to when clouds mean snow."

A SPEAKING ACQUAINTANCE WITH TREES

In her column, Anne Raver (see item above) quotes Donald Culross

Peattie, author of "A Natural History of Trees of Eastern

and Central North America": "Wherever you live, wherever

you tramp or travel, the trees of our country are wondrously companionable,

if you have a speaking acquaintance with them. When you have learned

their names, they say them back to you, as you encounter them

-- and very much more, for they speak of your own past experience

among them, and of our nation's forest life."

M A R G I N A L I A

I GET A CHARGE OUT OF YOU

IBM has developed a prototype for a Personal Area Network. The

PAN allows two people, each wearing a pager-like receiver and

transmitter the size of a deck of cards, to exchange data just

by touching each other. The transmission uses an electrical current

of one-billionth of an amp. IBM officials predict the technology

could be used not only for business purposes, but could, for instance,

one day allow emergency medical technicians to quickly gather

information on an accident victim's identity and medical history.

(Investor's Business Daily, Dec. 9)

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