Issue: 54

COLLEGE NEWS

- Groundbreaking for Kildee-Meat Lab addition Oct. 12

- Goal: More ag students studying abroad

- Four receive Ag Alumni Society awards

- Ag Development office returns to Curtiss

- Annual 4-H breakfast Oct. 11 in Curtiss Hall

- Students plan Ag Week events, Oct. 27-Nov. 2

- World Food Prize ceremony open to the public

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Cyberspace: Useful tool or pet rock?

INFOGRAZING

- Mentors for ISU female faculty, staff, students

- Report on future of ag colleges on the Web

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Do corporate and academic cultures mix?

MARGINALIA

- Stressed? Grumpy? Join the (laughing) club

C O L L E G E N E W S

GROUNDBREAKING FOR KILDEE-MEAT LAB ADDITION OCT. 12

Faculty, staff and students are invited to the groundbreaking

ceremony for the Kildee Hall-Meat Laboratory addition, 10 a.m.,

Saturday, Oct. 12, in Lush Auditorium of Kildee Hall. The $18.7

million project will provide more space for animal science teaching

and research programs. Gov. Terry Branstad, Regent Ellengray Kennedy

and President Jischke are among the speakers. Construction will

begin this fall and is scheduled for completion in 1998.

GOAL: MORE AG STUDENTS STUDYING ABROAD

The 1996-97 theme for the college's International Agriculture

Programs (IAP) is "Internationalizing Undergraduate Education."

Just over 1 percent of ISU ag undergrads studied abroad in 1995-96,

compared with 12 percent at Purdue. This year, 12 study-abroad

opportunities are available, compared with six last year. The

key to success is faculty involvement. IAP can help find sources

of money to defray costs for students and faculty, and handle

much of the administrative work. Ag faculty are leading courses

this year in Costa Rica, Belize, Ecuador, Mexico, Slovakia, Philippines

and other countries. For more information: 4-8454.

FOUR RECEIVE AG ALUMNI SOCIETY AWARDS

Four alumni were honored by the College of Agriculture Alumni

Society at the Reiman Gardens on Sept. 12. Gene Wiese of Manning

(Animal Science '51) received the Production Agriculture Award.

Peg Armstrong-Gustafson of Waukee (Animal Science '81) received

the Professional Agri-Business Award. Lee Kline of Des Moines

(Ag Journalism '51) received the Meritorious Award in Agriculture.

Neil Hamilton of West Des Moines (Forestry and Economics '76)

received the Innovator in Agriculture Award.

AG DEVELOPMENT OFFICE RETURNS TO CURTISS

The Agriculture Development office has moved back into 115 Curtiss

Hall from temporary quarters in Agronomy Hall. The phone number

remains the same: 4-7677.

ANNUAL 4-H BREAKFAST OCT. 11 IN CURTISS HALL

College faculty and staff are invited to the annual 4-H breakfast

to recognize ISU students who are state 4-H leaders or award winners.

The breakfast, with a brief program, begins at 7:30 a.m., Friday,

Oct. 11, on the second floor of Curtiss Hall. For more information:

Gaylan Scofield, 4-0045 or ggs@iastate.edu.

STUDENTS PLAN AG WEEK EVENTS, OCT. 27-NOV. 2

Students are planning special activities for Ag Week, Oct. 27-Nov.

2. (Ag Career Day will be held Nov. 12.) Ag Week is coordinated

by the Ag Council, and features events sponsored by student clubs,

including: an Oct. 30 symposium on risk management for farmers,

sponsored by the Collegiate Farm Bureau Club; mock interviews

and resume building, sponsored by the Ag Business Club; a costume

party and dance, sponsored by the Dairy Science Club; a volleyball

tournament, sponsored by the National Agri-Marketing Association;

and a hayride and barbecue, sponsored by the Ag Education Club.

For more information: Dan Belzer, 292-1876.

WORLD FOOD PRIZE CEREMONY OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

The winners of the 1996 World Food Prize will be announced Oct.

15 in Washington, DC. On Friday, Oct. 18, the public is invited

to the award ceremony at the Des Moines Civic Center, starting

at 4 p.m. The ceremony also will feature singer-songwriter John

Denver and Nobel Peace Prize winner Norman Borlaug. The College

of Agriculture is secretariat for the prize. For more information:

4-0706.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Oct. 12 -- Kildee -Meat Lab addition groundbreaking, Lush Auditorium,

10 a.m.

Oct. 18 - World Food Prize ceremony, Des Moines Civic Center,

4 p.m.

Oct. 27-Nov. 2: Ag Week at ISU

Nov. 12: Ag Career Day, Memorial Union

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

CYBERSPACE: USEFUL TOOL OR PET ROCK?

According to Yankelovich Partners' second annual "Cybercitizen"

survey, Internet users say the online services they value the

most provide frequent updates, quick downloads and fast searches.

The least useful sites included pictures, sound and bulletin boards.

The survey reports a drop in average online time from 16 to 12

hours a month. "There are widespread complaints about reliability,

value and usefulness. People are looking for a reason to stay,"

said a Yankelovich partner. Another said, "The long-term

viability of the medium is driven by the ability to provide people

with something beyond a novelty. Otherwise it will be like a pet

rock or something you get tired of and put on the shelf."

(Tampa Tribune, Sept. 30)

I N F O G R A Z I N G

MENTORS FOR ISU FEMALE FACULTY, STAFF, STUDENTS

Mentoring Networks is looking for mentors for ISU female faculty,

staff and students. The male or female mentors and their protégés

work together toward solutions for common time management, school

and career problems. Informational meetings will be held noon-1

p.m., Oct. 15, at 2532 Vet Med, and noon-1 p.m., Oct. 24, at the

Margaret Sloss Women's Center. Lunch is provided for those making

reservations by Oct. 11. Mentoring Networks is sponsored by the

Association of Women in Science, the Program for Women in Science

& Engineering and the Margaret Sloss Women's Center. For more

information: 4-4317 or 4-0886.

REPORT ON FUTURE OF AG COLLEGES ON THE WEB

For the past three years, a National Research Council committee

has looked at the future of colleges of agriculture in the land

grant university system. The committee's final report is now available

on the Web:

http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/landgrant/

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

DO CORPORATE AND ACADEMIC CULTURES MIX?

A Disney University executive says: "Everything today is

10 percent product and 90 percent service. It doesn't make any

difference what you're talking about, widgets or theme parks or

college campuses . . . How you market your classroom 'product'

to your consuming public has become essential." Not surprisingly,

many faculty think the corporate style is the wrong model for

the academic life and conformance to a set of rigid requirements

is an inappropriate goal where variation and experimentation are

important for their own sakes. (Lingua Franca, Sept.-Oct.)

M A R G I N A L I A

STRESSED? GRUMPY? JOIN THE (LAUGHING) CLUB

More than 100 laughing clubs have sprung up across India since

an enthusiastic doctor, Madan Kataria, popularized an ancient

yoga breathing and laughing posture. The laughers line up in neat

rows. They stretch, then try a warm-up laugh, building slowly

to steady "ha ha ha's" and "ho ho ho's" to

stimulate deep breathing. Soon the serious laughing begins, with

participants cavorting about, slapping each other's palms, laughing

hard enough to break a sweat. "No other activity exercises

the 32 muscles in your face," says one laugher. Devotees

say the exercises can help improve physical and mental health.

(Wall Street Journal, Sept. 12)

Share