Issue: 53

COLLEGE NEWS

- Open forum with President Jischke Sept. 25

- Fall enrollment up for ninth straight year

- Linkage project boosts ag education in Ukraine

- Nine patents to ag inventors in FY96

- World Food Prize to mark 10th anniversary

- Visit with ag alumni at the Gardens on Saturday

- With students back, Web page traffic increases

- Consider nominations for college, ISU awards

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Must . . . reach . . . delete . . . key . . . Must

. . . do . . . it

INFOGRAZING

- Miller estate sold; farm tenants arrange deals

- About a third of ISU inventions get patents

EXTERNAL VOICES

- What's lost when a species becomes extinct

MARGINALIA

- New season, new beginnings . . . and a glance back

C O L L E G E N E W S

OPEN FORUM WITH PRESIDENT JISCHKE ON SEPT. 25

College of Agriculture faculty and staff will be able to meet

with President Martin Jischke at an open forum on Wednesday, Sept.

25, in 171 Durham, beginning at 4:15 p.m. President Jischke will

make a few remarks and then take questions. The forum is part

of the president's annual visit with agriculture faculty, staff,

students and administrators.

FALL ENROLLMENT UP FOR NINTH STRAIGHT YEAR

Fall enrollment in the College of Agriculture is up for the ninth

straight year. There are 2,722 undergraduates and 649 graduate

students enrolled. Fall numbers for the past nine years:

1995: 2,654 undergrads; 591 graduates

1994: 2,594 undergrads; 627 graduates

1993: 2,487 undergrads; 642 graduates

1992: 2,282 undergrads; 642 graduates

1991: 2,170 undergrads; 649 graduates

1990: 2,065 undergrads; 643 graduates

1989: 1,986 undergrads: 649 graduates

1988: 1,959 undergrads; 716 graduates

LINKAGE PROJECT BOOSTS AG EDUCATION IN UKRAINE

During a recent trip to Kiev, representatives of the college and

ISU evaluated the progress of a linkage project with the National

Agricultural University of Ukraine. Funded by the U.S. Information

Agency, the project has completely revised the Ukrainian university's

curriculum, bringing it in line with ISU's curriculum and adding

new majors, including agricultural business. The new curriculum

will be adopted by 21 agricultural colleges in the country. Another

outcome: a new Institute of Agribusiness, which will help prepare

future agribusiness leaders in Ukraine.

NINE PATENTS TO AG INVENTORS IN FY96

Nine patents were awarded to College of Agriculture inventors

during fiscal year 1996, according to the ISU Research Foundation

(ISURF). The inventions were: a method for reducing contamination

of animal carcasses during slaughter; a wet-grain unloading system;

two soybean varieties; a post-slaughter process to improve pork

quality; a method for using soybean oil to produce fuel blends

that better withstand cold temperatures; preparing molded articles

with materials containing soy protein; a descriptive record system

for livestock; and administration of an enzyme that lowers human

cholesterol. (See "Infograzing" for more on ISU patents.)

WORLD FOOD PRIZE TO MARK 10TH ANNIVERSARY

Ceremonies marking the 10th anniversary of the World Food Prize

will be held 4 to 5:30 p.m., Friday, Oct. 18, at the Des Moines

Civic Center. The College of Agriculture serves as secretariat

for the prize. The event is open to the public and will honor

the 1996 winners. It also will include appearances by singer-songwriter

John Denver and previous winners of the prize. The $200,000 World

Food Prize recognizes people who have improved the quality, quantity

or availability of food in the world.

VISIT WITH AG ALUMNI AT THE GARDENS ON SATURDAY

Faculty and staff are encouraged to stop by the Reiman Gardens

tomorrow (Saturday, Sept. 21) and visit with ag alumni at the

College of Agriculture Alumni Society's annual gathering. It starts

at 10:30 a.m. If you'd like to eat the barbecue prepared by the

Iowa Pork Producers, call 4-6614 to reserve a $10 meal ticket

or show up tomorrow and buy a ticket.

WITH STUDENTS BACK, WEB PAGE TRAFFIC INCREASES

Students returning to campus in the past month helped boost "hits"

on the college's Web server. (The college's Web server maintains

about half the links you can get to from the college home page;

the rest are maintained in departments, centers and elsewhere.)

The average number of hits, or requests for information, increased

to 4,940 per day during the first half of September, up from 4,054

per day in August. July's daily average was 3,884. About 23 percent

of total hits come from ISU computer users.

CONSIDER NOMINATIONS FOR COLLEGE, ISU AWARDS

Nomination forms for 1996-97 College of Agriculture and university

awards are now available in departmental and area extension offices.

Many of the award nominations have a Nov. 1 deadline. For more

information, see the packet in your departmental office or call

4-6614.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Sept. 21: Ag Alumni Society Get-Together, Reiman Gardens, 10:30

a.m.

Sept. 24-26: Farm Progress Show, Amana

Oct. 1: Faculty improvement leave applications due, 122 Curtiss

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

MUST . . . REACH . . . DELETE . . . KEY . . . MUST . . . DO .

. . IT

More information has been produced over the last 30 years than

in the previous 5,000. To avoid becoming overwhelmed, experts

recommend these strategies: 1) Prioritize your information --

know what to remember and what to forget. One simple rule: Remember

only what interests you; forget the rest. If you're interested,

chances are greater you'll actually put the information to use.

2) Don't over-analyze. Analysis can lead to paralysis. Pick your

best data and go with it. 3) Delete. Don't be afraid to click

on the delete box -- both on-screen and in your mind. Futurists

predict the information explosion will only continue to mushroom

-- so relax, prioritize, go with what you've got and hit that

delete key. (Investor's Business Daily, May 21)

I N F O G R A Z I N G

MILLER ESTATE SOLD; FARM TENANTS ARRANGE DEALS

Until today's announcement of an anonymous $34 million gift to

the College of Agriculture, the largest gift to ISU had been half

of the $27 million F.W. Miller estate, which was left to ISU and

the University of Iowa. ISU and the University of Iowa have now

sold the 31 farms in the Miller estate. About half the sales are

finished, and closings on the remaining farms will be completed

next spring. All the farms have been sold through the tenants.

Some have purchased the farms themselves; others have lined up

third-party buyers and made arrangements to continue farming the

land. Miller, a Rockwell City lawyer and farm manager, died in

1995. The estate's 31 farms comprised 7,200 acres in north-central

Iowa.

ABOUT A THIRD OF ISU INVENTIONS GET PATENTS

In FY96, ISU inventors received 46 patents. According to ISURF,

on average, for every 100 ISU inventions considered for commercialization,

about 30 to 35 are patented, 20 are licensed to companies and

perhaps five are commercially successful. In the latest list of

royalties received from licensed patents, ISU ranked sixth among

U.S. universities, with 45 licenses generating $9.6 million in

1994. First was the University of California, with more than 450

licenses generating $50 million. In the business world, IBM topped

the list of U.S. patent winners for 1995, with 1,383 patents awarded.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

WHAT'S LOST WHEN A SPECIES BECOMES EXTINCT

At the 33rd Paul Errington Memorial Lecture last week, Pulitzer

Prize-winning scientist E.O. Wilson spoke on the value of biodiversity.

To illustrate the threat to endangered plants and animals, he

gave this example: If you uncoiled a strand of DNA from a plant

or animal and magnified it so it was one-tenth of an inch wide,

you'd get a length of genetics that stretched from New York to

Dallas. "And that, ladies and gentlemen, is what we lose

when we lose a species," said Wilson. (Several departments,

programs and student clubs in the College of Agriculture were

among the sponsors of the lecture.)

M A R G I N A L I A

NEW SEASON, NEW BEGINNINGS . . . AND A GLANCE BACK

"The end of summer is a thief . . . To be sure, summer's

end is also the return to school. We surround the start of the

academic year with images of new beginnings. New clothes, new

books; we encourage returning students to think in terms of new

opportunities and new friends. And yet, even as we wave the eager

and anxious youngsters on, we cannot help but think the wistful

thought, 'Those heedless days, for me, are done.' It is the memory

of loss that summer's end provokes in us, even as we go about

renewing." From an opinion piece written by Carlo Busby in

the Sept. 3 Wall Street Journal.

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