Issue: 524

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COLLEGE NEWS
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AG WEEK HALLOWEEN DANCE RESCHEDULED
The Dairy Science Halloween dance, part of Ag Week activities listed in last week's Ag and Life Sciences Online, has been rescheduled for Oct. 30 in the Maintenance Shop from 8 a.m. to midnight. Cost is $5 at the door and those attending must be at least 18. It will be a costume dance with prizes going to the best male, female and group costumes.

ALUMNI AWARDS TO BE PRESENTED OCT. 24
On Oct. 24, the ISU Alumni Association will present College of Agriculture and Life Sciences awards to alumni and an emeritus professor. Becker-Underwood founder Roger Underwood, who graduated in 1980 with a bachelor's degree in agricultural business, will receive the Floyd Andre Award. Retired Pioneer Hi-Bred International executive and former president of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, Owen Newlin, who earned bachelor's and master's degrees in agronomy in 1951 and 1953, will receive the Henry A. Wallace Award. John Pesek, Richard and Nancy Degner will be given the George Washington Carver Distinguished Service Award. Alumni Association awards also will go to Ryan Schon, who earned a bachelor's degree in agronomy in 1995, and will be presented one of the James A. Hopson Alumni Volunteer Award. In addition, Vaughn and his wife, Mary, will receive the National Service Award. He earned bachelor's degree in animal science in 1949, a master's and doctorate degrees in animal nutrition in 1951 and1957. The awards ceremony will begin at 1:30 p.m. at the Scheman Building and is open to the public. More: http://www.isualum.org/honorsandawards

PLANT PATHOLOGY ALUM DIES AT AGE 108
Alumnus Chen Hongkui died Oct. 12 in his native China at the age of 108. He enrolled at Iowa State College in 1931 to study plant pathology and received his doctorate degree in 1934. After returning to China in 1935, he joined Zhejiang University as an associate professor. He is regarded as one of the founders of China's plant quarantine system and was awarded the National Professor of Distinction, the country's highest honor for a professor. A group of Iowa State faculty and staff on a study abroad trip visited Chen in 2006 and helped celebrate his 106th birthday. A story and photo of that visit is at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/news/chenbday.html

AGRICULTURE STUDY ABROAD BARBECUE THURSDAY
Agriculture Study Abroad will host a barbecue Thursday, Oct. 23, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Kildee Hall's Farm Bureau Pavilion. All College students are invited to learn about various study abroad programs offered for the 2008-2009 academic year.

FEEDING THE WORLD SEMINAR: UC DAVIS PROFESSOR TO SPEAK NOV. 4
The next “Feeding the World: Are We Making Progress?” seminar at noon, Nov. 4, will hear from Montague Demment, professor and director of the Global Livestock CRSP at the University of California, Davis. The title of his presentation is, “Role of Livestock in Building Human, Institutional and Financial Capital in Developing Countries.” The seminar will be held in the Ensminger Room, Kildee Hall. The seminar series is sponsored by the M.E. Ensminger International Chair in Animal Agriculture, the Raymond and Mary Baker Chair in Global Agriculture and the Center for Sustainable Rural Livelihoods.

MEAT JUDGING TEAM FINISHES THIRD IN ISU CONTEST
The Meat Judging Team finished third at the 31st Annual Iowa State University Meat Evaluation Contest Oct. 11. The team placed in the following divisions: third in beef grading and sectioned and formed hams; and fourth in beef judging, lamb judging, pork judging, specifications and summer sausage. Individual accomplishments included: Garrett Skaar, 10th high individual in the contest and high individual on the ISU team; Tonina Desimone, third high individual in lamb judging; and Isaiah Spath, fourth high individual in beef grading. Other team members included Laura Rosenbohm and Crystal Wagner. Students from Iowa State, Kansas State University, North Dakota State University, South Dakota State University, University of Missouri and University of Nebraska participated. South Dakota State finished first and Kansas State was second.

ELWYNN TAYLOR TO SPEAK AT THINK TANK ON ANIMAL AGRICULTURE
On Oct. 27, Elwynn Taylor, agronomy/extension, will present "Our Changing Climate: How Does It Happen?" at the Think Tank on Animal Agriculture meeting. Register your attendance before noon Oct. 24 by contacting Ardella Krull at amkrull@iastate.edu. The meeting begins with social time at 6 p.m., with dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the program at 7 p.m. in the Cardinal Room, Memorial Union. Cost of the buffet dinner will be $20, which is payable at the door.

BORLAUG POSTER CONTEST WINNERS ANNOUNCED
Winners of the seventh annual Norman Borlaug Lectureship Poster Competition were announced Oct. 13 after the Borlaug Lecture. The poster topic was World Food Issues. In the graduate category, the winners were: Jovin Hasjim, food science and human nutrition, first, for Properties and health benefits of a novel resistant starch; Eric Nonnecke, food science and human nutrition, second, for Nutritional assessment of school children in Uganda; and Maitri Thakur, agricultural and biosystems engineering, third, for Ensuring food safety through traceability system database modeling in the United States grain supply chain. In the undergraduate category, the winners were: Joel Weiler, nutritional science, first, Iron bioavailability of a wild African berry; Anna Webb and Leah Riesselman, horticulture, second, for Plant propagation as a method of providing planting materials: An educational approach; and Emily Eggleston, agronomy, third, Sustainable soil fertility for rural Uganda vegetable production.

OFFICE OF BIOTECHNOLOGY FUNDS NEW FACULTY PROJECTS
The Office of Biotechnology has awarded $550,000 to newly hired biotechnology faculty scientists to help establish their research programs at Iowa State. Those with College appointments include: Nicholas Gabler, Jason Ross and Joshua Selsby, animal science; Matthew Rowling, food science and human nutrition; and Olga Zabotina; biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology. More: http://www.biotech.iastate.edu/news/Oct-20-2008.html

SMALL FARMS HAVE BIG POTENTIAL, EXTENSION SPECIALIST SAYS
How big is a small farm? What may seem like a contradiction is instead a key question for understanding Iowa's farm economy, says Andy Larson. Larson is ISU Extension's new small farms specialist. Larson and ISU Extension's Small Farm Sustainability program are sorting through the issues. Details: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/news/2008/oct/121402.htm

ICM CONFERENCE AND AGRIBUSINESS EXPO DEC. 10-11
The Iowa State Integrated Crop Management Conference and the Agribusiness Association of Iowa Agribusiness Expo will be Dec. 10-11 at Iowa State. The conference is hosted by ISU Extension, the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the agronomy, entomology, plant pathology, and agricultural and biosystems engineering departments. More: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/news/2008/oct/061501.htm

ON-FARM RESEARCH CONFERENCE FOCUSES ON QUALITY DATA
An upcoming On-Farm Research Conference features training on how to conduct scientifically valid in-field research. The school will be held Dec.18-19 at the Knapp-Storms Dining Complex and is conducted by ISU Extension and the ISU Corn and Soybean Initiative. More: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/news/2008/oct/061503.htm

NEW CELLULOSIC BIOMASS PROJECT UNDERWAY
The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and the Iowa Learning Farm are coordinating a three-year project that focuses on cellulosic biomass for ethanol production. Iowa State was a recipient of a federally funded grant to make the project possible. Details: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/news/2008/oct/141701.htm

LEOPOLD CENTER WORKSHOP CONTINUES HYPOXIA DISCUSSION
The goal of reducing the size of the low-oxygen 'dead zone' in the Gulf of Mexico to 2,000 square miles by 2015 probably will not be reached, but conditions need to start improving. That was the message Oct. 16 from Darrell Brown, who coordinates hypoxia reduction efforts for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He was a keynote speaker at a workshop sponsored by the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture with support from the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development. More: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/news/newsreleases/2008/101708_hypoxia.html

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS
Oct. 20: Block and Bridle “Meat your Future,” 6 to 9 p.m., Kildee Pavilion
Oct. 20: Ag Business and Alpha Zeta Roundtable, 6 p.m., Carver Hall Room 1
Oct. 21: Ag Career Day, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Memorial Union
Oct. 24: ISU Alumni Association awards presentation, 1:30 p.m., Scheman Building, http://www.isualum.org/honorsandawards
Oct. 29: Ag Entrepreneurs Roundtable, 6 p.m., Scheman Building
Nov. 7-8: MANRRS Region V Workshop, campus
Nov. 18: College deadline for university award nominations, http://www.ag.iastate.edu/agcoll/awards.php

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COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK
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IF YOU BEGIN A SENTENCE WITH 'IF' . . .
“If I were a rich gal, Ya ha deedle deedle, bubba bubba deedle deedle dum . . .” When things get iffy, it sometimes helps to sing this song from Fiddler on the Roof. "If" at the beginning of a sentence or clause oftentimes signals a statement that is contrary to fact. And when this subjunctive mood kicks into gear, the verb we need here is "were" instead of "was," regardless of whether the subject is singular or plural. The subjunctive uses the base form of the verb with all subjects. “Wish” also tips off the subjunctive mood: "If wishes were horses..." but also "She wished he were more gregarious at these functions." If that sounds clunky to you, ask yourself if the statements are true. Are wishes horses? Nope. Is he gregarious? Unfortunately, he is not. So the subjunctive is at play, and "were" swings into action. (Association for Communications Excellence Grammar Hint, http://www.aceweb.org/sigs/writing/grammar02-11-2008.php)

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INFOGRAZING
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ROBERT BROWN TO PRESENT PRESIDENTIAL LECTURE ON BIOFUELS
Robert Brown, Bioeconomy Institute, who studies the conversion of biomass to biofuels, will deliver this fall's Presidential University Lecture at 8 p.m., Monday, Oct. 27, in the Sun Room, Memorial Union. He'll discuss, “Why are We Producing Biofuels?” More: http://www.public.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2008/oct/brownlecture.shtml

HOWELL DEVELOPED FORERUNNER OF NOBEL RESEARCH
This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry was given to researchers for their work on illuminating living cells that enables scientists to study how genes, proteins and entire cells operate. Stephen Howell, director of the Plant Sciences Institute, developed a technology producing similar results more than 20 years ago. More: http://www.public.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2008/oct/nobel.shtml

DODGE DIABETES WALK SET FOR NOV. 5
On Nov. 5 the third annual Dodge Diabetes Walk will take place on central campus. From 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. you can walk and receive information along the way on how to decrease your risk for Type 2 Diabetes. The route is circular with info stations at the north side of the Memorial to the front of Curtiss Hall to the south side of MacKay Hall to the front of Beardshear. The walk can be started at any spot.

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EXTERNAL VOICES
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CARVER PROVIDES POWERFUL IMAGE TO YOUNG PEOPLE
“His image is so powerful in these kids' minds that they just want to be like him. That's one of the big reasons I wanted to come here.”
--John Strother, science teacher at Second Baptist Christian Prep in South Carolina, talking about George Washington Carver. Strother attended the Inaugural George Washington Carver Symposium, last weekend at the Carver National Monument in Diamond, Mo. The College helped sponsor the event and it included Iowa State speakers Harold “Sande” McNabb, plant pathology professor emeritus; Gerald Klonglan, former associate dean and sociology professor; and Mary de Baca, diversity programs. (Neosho Daily News, http://www.neoshodailynews.com/news/x1196570170/115-attend-symposium)

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MARGINALIA
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SOIL SAMPLING JOB PART OF NOVEL CAREER SEARCH
Californian Daniel Seddiqui spent a few days earlier this month working in Agronomy Hall collecting soil samples and running lab tests in his quest to travel to all 50 states and work 50 different jobs in 50 weeks. According to an article in the Ames Tribune, Seddiqui graduated from the University of Southern California in 2005 with a degree in economics, but failed to find a job after close to 50 job interviews. “Confused, distraught and wondering what came next, he hit the road with doubts and questions about his future. After a 50 job odyssey in 50 states over 50 weeks, he hopes to have some answers,” the story explained. More: http://www.midiowanews.com/site/tab1.cfm?newsid=20156077&BRD=2700&PAG=46...

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AG AND LIFE SCIENCES ONLINE
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EDITOR
Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu
Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

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