Issue: 48

COLLEGE NEWS

- News on Experiment Station assistant directors

- Engineering services and farm service phased out

- Scholarship theme for faculty-staff retreat Aug. 22

- Teacher's Academy for Ag Awareness hosts 70

- Summer enrollment in college: 952

- Summer Students at Work: The Pine Needle Problem

- Summer Students at Work: Approaches to Pig Viruses

- Useful information on virtual Brenton Center tour

- Join Brenton Center's educational Web site gallery

- Entomology Web site praised in "Digital Dozen"

- Better moo-ve it to be a state fair volunteer

- 248 return Ag Online survey; book winners chosen

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Give reporters the big picture on research

INFOGRAZING

- Survey: Media don't report on whole diet

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Link between success and communication

MARGINALIA

- Heavy frogs part of exterior decorating craze

C O L L E G E N E W S

NEWS ON EXPERIMENT STATION ASSISTANT DIRECTORS

Effective July 1, Prem Paul, associate dean of the College of

Veterinary Medicine, has a 10-percent appointment in the College

of Agriculture as an assistant director of the Iowa Agriculture

and Home Economics Experiment Station. He'll provide leadership

in Experiment Station projects related to veterinary medicine

and in faculty development in research and grantsmanship. Also:

Assistant director Susan Lamont's position will become a 30-percent

appointment from 50 percent, which means assistant director Gerald

Klonglan will now lead efforts in minority graduate research internships.

ENGINEERING SERVICES AND FARM SERVICE PHASED OUT

The Experiment Station's engineering services and farm service

maintenance departments will be eliminated effective July 31.

The departments worked on planning, improving and maintaining

facilities on research farms around Ames and the state. These

services will now be provided by Facilities Planning and Management

or local vendors with standing contracts with ISU. The departments'

seven employees have found new positions at ISU or in private

industry. Experiment Station engineer Mark Huss has a new job

with Facilities Planning and Management but will provide consultation

on research-farm projects through October. For more information,

contact Colin Scanes, 4-1823.

SCHOLARSHIP THEME FOR FACULTY-STAFF RETREAT AUG. 22

The theme of this year's College of Agriculture faculty-staff

retreat is "Redefining Scholarship." It will focus on

the meaning of scholarly activity in teaching, research and outreach,

and how to assess quality performance in these areas. The retreat

will be held 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 22, at the Scheman

Building, and will include lunch. Watch for more details in Ag

Online.

TEACHER'S ACADEMY FOR AG AWARENESS HOSTS 70

Seventy teachers attended two sessions of the Teacher's Academy

for Agricultural Awareness in late June. The five-year-old academy

has now hosted nearly 300 teachers, mostly from elementary and

middle schools. The academy, established by Robert Martin, agricultural

education and studies, teaches teachers about Iowa agriculture.

Participants develop classroom activities emphasizing agriculture

and return home with new materials and ideas for their students.

June's academy included presenters from Iowa Farm Bureau, the

state's major commodity groups, the Leopold Center, Farm Safety

4 Just Kids and ISU's horticulture department. Teachers visited

the food science and human nutrition department, Reiman Gardens

and the Center for Crops Utilization Research.

SUMMER ENROLLMENT IN COLLEGE: 952

Summer enrollment in the College of Agriculture is 952 -- 433

undergraduate and 519 graduate students. Total ISU summer enrollment

is 8,785 -- 5,746 undergraduate and 3,039 graduate.

SUMMER STUDENTS AT WORK: THE PINE NEEDLE PROBLEM

Erika Blackburn, a biology senior, is working in Stephen Ford's

animal science lab in a summer research internship from the Women

in Science and Engineering Program. Last semester, Blackburn began

studying how pregnant beef cows are affected by eating ponderosa

pine needles, a problem for Western cattle ranchers. Ford is Blackburn's

mentor in the Research Careers for Minority Scholars Program.

SUMMER STUDENTS AT WORK: APPROACHES TO PIG VIRUSES

Susan Hartman, a veterinary student working on a master's degree

in microbiology, immunology and preventive medicine, is developing

a test for swine intestinal viruses that are often difficult to

diagnose. Working with several MIPM professors, Hartman hopes

to have a working test by the end of the summer. Also, Matt Anderson,

a Merck Scholar student, is working to produce an antibody for

CVM, another pig virus. In humans, the virus is associated with

birth defects and transplant complications.

USEFUL INFORMATION ON BRENTON CENTER VIRTUAL TOUR

Want to reserve a room in the Brenton Center, get a virtual tour

of the center's instructional technology and classroom layout,

or find a quick guide to creating graphics for distance learning?

You can do it all from your computer by calling up the Brenton

Center for Agricultural Instruction and Technology Transfer's

Web site, which can be found under the Extension and Outreach

link on the College of Agriculture's home page (http://www.ag.iastate.edu/).

The site also has PowerPoint templates optimized for TV display

that can be downloaded, plus links to other distance learning

and Web development sites. For more information on room availability

and reservations, call Jeannette Drewry, 4-1862.

JOIN BRENTON CENTER'S EDUCATIONAL WEB SITE GALLERY

The Brenton Center is compiling a list of College of Agriculture

Web sites designed for classroom instructional support or outreach

for its "Instructional Web Site Gallery" link on its

home page. Faculty and staff are invited to share their educational

sites for the gallery. Send the URL and a brief description of

the site to Allan Schmidt, aschmidt@iastate.edu.

ENTOMOLOGY WEB SITE PRAISED IN "DIGITAL DOZEN"

Tick movies, insect dissections and a mosquito gallery won over

the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC), which recently featured

ISU's Entomology Image Page in its "Digital Dozen,"

where educational Web sites are highlighted. The U.S. Department

of Education-sponsored ENC (found at http://www.enc.org) collects

physical and virtual resources useful to K-12 math and science

teachers. Criteria to select "Digital Dozen" sites include

valuable math and/or science content, teacher appeal, clear navigational

aids and "that something special." Entomology's home

page is: http://www.public.iastate.edu/~entomology/homepage.html

BETTER MOO-VE IT TO BE A STATE FAIR VOLUNTEER

Faculty and staff volunteers are needed to staff the College of

Agriculture's dairy-themed exhibit at the Iowa State Fair, Aug.

8-18. Two volunteers work each four-hour shift, starting at 9

a.m. Volunteers get free admission and parking tickets. Look for

your departmental sign-up sheets, which need to be returned by

July 19, or contact Marty Behrens, 4-5616, or Jennifer Bensen,

4-3538 (bensen@iastate.edu).

248 RETURN AG ONLINE SURVEY; BOOK WINNERS CHOSEN

Thanks to the 248 subscribers who returned an Ag Online survey

-- your answers and comments are appreciated. That's about a 61

percent response rate. Here's the randomly chosen respondents

who'll receive a book on improving communications: Jerry DeWitt,

Anita Nimtz, Linda Drennan, Mary Ellen Hurt and Nancy Holcomb.

We'll share survey results in the next month or so.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

July 19: Deadline to return State Fair sign-up sheets to Ag Info,

304 Curtiss

Aug. 8-18: Iowa State Fair (volunteer to staff college exhibit,

4-5616)

Aug. 22: College of Agriculture faculty-staff retreat, Scheman

Building

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

GIVE REPORTERS THE BIG PICTURE ON RESEARCH

In a survey of media stories on scientific research on food and

nutrition, details that would help consumers judge a study's relevance

to their own diets were lacking, according to the International

Food Information Council (see item in "Infograzing").

"It's important for information sources to orient the news

reporter to the larger perspective," said Delia Hammock,

director and editor of nutrition at Good Housekeeping. "Even

if the information doesn't get into the story, help the reporter

understand the information. The only way to have any credibility

as an information resource is to serve as an educator to the reporter

and provide the full perspective on the issues." (Food Chemical

News, April 15)

I N F O G R A Z I N G

SURVEY: MEDIA DON'T REPORT ON WHOLE DIET

An International Food Information Council survey of 1,000 stories

on food and diet in 53 media sources found that news reporters

are doing a better job covering food issues, but they still tend

to focus too much on benefits and harms of individual foods rather

than how consumers can put together a variety of foods to build

a healthful diet. The media's greatest failing: the lack of context

needed to understand overall nutrition recommendations about individual

foods. Other findings: reducing dietary fat received twice the

coverage of any nutrition topic, followed by disease prevention

through proper diet. (Food Chemical News, April 15)

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

LINK BETWEEN SUCCESS AND COMMUNICATION

"I can't see a correlation between the number of hours people

work and (success). What I do see is a correlation between success

and the ability to communicate, the ability to focus on priorities."

Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert, the cartoon-strip chronicle of

employers and employees. (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 8, 1995)

M A R G I N A L I A

HEAVY FROGS PART OF EXTERIOR DECORATING CRAZE

The National Gardening Association estimates that 72 million people

spent time in their gardens last year, paying $22.2 billion to

support the hobby. About 25 percent of that is spent on plants,

and the rest on equipment, fertilizer and insect control. "Then

you get down to the froufrou," said Bruce Butterfield, an

analyst with the association, referring to fountains, statues,

fishponds, gazebos and other decorative flourishes for the backyard.

A woman outside Philadelphia bought a 1,000-pound marble frog

that was so big she had to put 75 pounds of crushed stone underneath

it so it wouldn't sink into her lawn. (New York Times, June 23)

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