Issue: 463

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COLLEGE NEWS
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CURTISS HALL GROUP TOURS DAIRY AND RESEARCH FARMS
A dozen people from several offices in Curtiss Hall took a tour of the new Dairy Farm July 31. Research Farms was the host and coordinator Mark Honeyman served as tour guide. After the Dairy Farm tour, the group visited the Ag Engineering/Agronomy Farm where they toured the new shop and saw some large spraying and harvesting equipment. A tour of the grounds of the Horticulture Station followed with refreshments.

FOOD SCIENCE TEAM COMPETES WITH HEALTHFUL SNACK
French Sticks was the food item that a team of food science undergraduate and graduate students developed to compete in the Student National Product Competition last month at the annual meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists. The low-calorie, highly nutritious snack is a baked cauliflower form of French fries. French Sticks has 0 grams of fat and trans fat, 70 percent fewer calories than French fries, and is a good source of Vitamin C and dietary fiber and calcium. The team finished fourth of the six final teams in the competition. The team, which is advised by Mark Love, food science and human nutrition, took nine months to develop French Sticks.

MS IN AGRONOMY DISTANCE EDUCATION PROGRAM CELEBRATES 10 YEARS
The Masters of Science in Agronomy Distance Education Program marks its 10th anniversary this year. The program was approved by the Iowa Board of Regents in 1997, enrolled its first students in 1998 and had its first graduates in 2001. The program has provided degrees for 34 graduates since then. There are more than 100 students active in the program. Learn more and check out the program's anniversary video and publication at: http://masters.agron.iastate.edu/.

BUNDY NAMED GLOBAL AGRICULTURE FELLOW
Rich Bundy, Iowa State University Foundation associate vice president of development, has been appointed a Global Agriculture Fellow for the College through Dec. 30. The appointment is in recognition of Bundy's work in managing international development. His responsibilities include advising David Acker, the Raymond and Mary Baker Chair in Global Agriculture, on field-based activities; assisting student activities in Uganda; and assisting in a presentation of an ISU Honors seminar, “Hunger, Poverty and the United Nations” this fall.

IOWA STATE RESEARCHERS WORK TO TRACK CLIMATE CHANGE
Three College faculty have joined an international group of scientists collaborating on the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program to track climate change. The National Science Foundation is funding the Iowa State work on the project with a $353,000 grant. More: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2007/aug/climate.shtml

ISU SEEKS WEATHER WATCHERS FOR NATIONAL PROGRAM
Researchers at Iowa State and the National Weather Service are looking for weather observers to help track precipitation in Iowa as part of a national weather observation network. Learn more: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news_detail.php?var1=349

NEW STAFF ATTORNEY AT IOWA STATE EXPANDS SERVICE TO IOWANS
Erin Herbold began her work as the first staff attorney at the Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Aug. 1. She will work with Roger McEowen, Leonard Dolezal Professor in Agricultural Law, to present seminars for law practitioners, accountants, Iowa Bar Association members, farmers and agribusinesses. Details: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news_detail.php?var1=348

RECOMMENDATIONS SEEK TO REVITALIZE AG EDUCATION IN IOWA
Introducing agricultural courses in Iowa middle schools, adding agricultural courses to high schools that don't have them and allowing agri-science classes to meet high school science requirements are some of the suggestions of the Iowa Governor's Council on Agricultural Education to revitalize agricultural education in the state. Learn more: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news_detail.php?var1=350

RESEARCH SHEDS LIGHT ASIAN SOYBEAN RUST INFECTION
An extensive analysis of molecular changes that occur while a plant is being infected by the Asian soybean rust fungus reveals new information that could lead to a soybean variety with broad-spectrum resistance, say the Iowa State plant pathologists who led the research. Details: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2007/aug/asianrust.shtml

PLANT SCIENCES INSTITUTE GIVES NEW RESEARCH A JUMP START
Six new research projects at Iowa State are tackling scientific challenges facing Iowa agriculture. The innovative projects recently received start-up funding from Iowa State's Plant Sciences Institute. Details: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2007/jul/research.shtml

2007 MANURE MANAGEMENT CLINIC REGISTRATION IS AVAILABLE
The Iowa Manure Management Action Group, in cooperation with Iowa State University Extension and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, is sponsoring a manure management clinic Aug. 28 and 29. Learn more: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/news/2007/jul/073101.htm

BIORENEWABLES FOCUS OF REIMAN GARDENS TOUR
Plants that may someday be used to fuel ethanol production are the subject of a Biowalk Tour hosted by Reiman Gardens that runs through the rest of the summer. Learn more: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2007/aug/biowalk.shtml

DEADLINES & REMINDERS
Aug. 13: Armstrong Research and Demonstration Farm field day, 5 p.m., near Lewis
Aug. 14: Muscatine Island Research and Demonstration Farm field day, 5 p.m., Fruitland

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COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK
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THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AFFECT AND EFFECT
“Affect,” which almost always is a verb, means to influence or have an effect on, as in "the adverse publicity affected the election." The noun “affect” has a specialized meaning in psychology: an emotion or mood. “Effect,” usually a noun, means an outcome or result, as in "the candidate's attempted explanations had no effect." But it may also be a verb meaning to make happen or produce, as in "the goal had been to effect a major change in campus politics." (The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th ed., 2003)

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INFOGRAZING
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EXTENSION SPECIALIST TO BE PRESENTED DAIRY AWARD
The Iowa State Dairy Association will present its Ralph Keeling Leadership Award to Dale Thoreson, extension dairy, beef and forage specialist. Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey and association board president Wayne Dykshorn will present the award Aug. 10 at the Iowa State Fair. Thoreson serves 11 counties in northeast Iowa.

HILTON CHAIR FLORIDA TO PRESENT LECTURE SEPT. 19
Richard Florida, the Helen LeBaron Hilton Chair for 2008, will give a lecture on Sept 19. Florida has gained recognition for two books, “The Rise of the Creative Class” and “The Flight of the Creative Class.” Florida will share his expertise on economic competitiveness, demographic trends and cultural and technological innovation. The lecture is open to the public. It will begin at 8 p.m. in Stephens Auditorium.

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EXTERNAL VOICES
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FARMING TURNED INTO ENTERPRISE
“Farming in New Zealand is now a cold, hard business. I think we have benefited hugely. What's happened since the reforms is that you have a new type of farm emerging - a business farm.” Giving up subsidies made farming harder, he conceded, but introduced the pride that comes of entrepreneurship.
-- Malcolm Lumsden, New Zealand dairy farmer who was president of Federated Farmers when the government eliminated agricultural subsidies in 1984 (New York Times, Aug. 2, http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/02/business/worldbusiness/02farm.html?pag...)

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MARGINALIA
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THE 'OTHER' WATER TOWER AT ISU'S HORTICULTURE STATION
Iowa State's "other" water tower is a 3,000 gallon steel structure at the Horticulture Station north of Ames. The tower was built in the 1960s when the horticultural research was moved and the station opened. The water tower is used during the growing season for rapid filling of sprayers and water wagons. The water tower recently has been sandblasted and repainted. Other recent improvements to the Horticulture Station include: road paving, wireless Internet access, updated machinery and newly planted orchards and vineyards.

MORE ABOUT THE ISU HORTICULTURE STATION
The Horticulture Station is a College of Agriculture and Life Sciences facility that hosts researchers, student learners, visitors and programs. In 2007, the Horticulture Station serves more than 80 projects led by 15 faculty from five departments. It also is the home of the ISU Student Organic Farm. The station is on track to host more than 1,500 visitors this year, which is about twice the number of two years ago. The departments of horticulture and natural resource ecology and management classes regularly use the station for classes. The Horticulture Station is overseen by a faculty advisory committee with representatives from the major users. Produce is marketed to ISU Dining and local venues, including restaurants.

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AG AND LIFE SCIENCES ONLINE
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EDITOR
Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu
Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

SUBSCRIBE
Ag and Life Sciences Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, is e-mailed every Monday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag and Life Sciences Online subscribe" to edadcock@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag and Life Sciences Online unsubscribe."

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