Issue: 44

COLLEGE NEWS

- The Curtiss Hall shuffle, '96 edition

- Spring field days set out on the farms

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- What makes an effective letter to the editor?

INFOGRAZING

- Ten myths about population problems

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Each generation shapes the mind of the teacher

MARGINALIA

- Amazing Grace the Goat

C O L L E G E N E W S

THE CURTISS HALL SHUFFLE, '96 EDITION

Renovation of Curtiss Hall's first-floor corridor and offices

has begun. Several College of Agriculture and Experiment Station

offices have been temporarily relocated, probably through the

end of the year. Below is a guide for finding people and offices

-- but here's an important note: Continue to send campus mail

to their old office numbers, which will make mail sorting easier.

All phone numbers remain the same. Other college offices will

be shifted in June -- stay tuned.

David Topel, Dean, Room 223

Colin Scanes, Executive Associate Dean, Room 223A

Gerald Klonglan, Associate Dean-Nat'l Programs, Room 223B

Eric Hoiberg, Associate Dean-State Programs, Room 223C

Joyce Shiers, Dean's Office, Room 223

Cindy Hansen, Dean's Office, Room 223

Cathy Good, Executive Associate Dean's Office, Room 223

Marie Miller, Associate Dean-Nat'l Programs Office, Room 213A

Norma Hensley, Associate Dean-State Programs Office, Room 213B

Susan Lamont, Assistant Director-Experiment Station, 201 Kildee

Hall

Shirley Riney, Experiment Station Office, Room 26

Carla Persaud, Experiment Station Office, Room 26

Eduard Becerra, International Programs, Room 18

Victor Udin, International Programs, Room 313

Galina Krasikova, International Programs, Room 313

Joe Dale, International Programs, Room 313

Harold Crawford, Brenton Center, Room 4

SPRING FIELD DAYS SET OUT ON THE FARMS

Spring field days are set for ISU's Research and Demonstration

Farms around Iowa, including June 11, Northeast, Nashua; June

12, Northern, Kanawha; June 18, Southeast, Crawfordsville; June

19, Northwest, Sutherland; June 20, Neely-Kinyon, Greenfield;

July 16, Muscatine Island, Fruitland. On Sept. 11, the Western

Research and Demonstration Farm, Castana, celebrates its 50th

anniversary. For more details, call 4-4620.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

WHAT MAKES AN EFFECTIVE LETTER TO THE EDITOR?

Brevity. A letter of 150 to 200 words is more likely to be printed.

Study the letters page of the newspaper (or other publication)

to get an idea of typical length of letters. Also: Readability

and timeliness. Give specific examples and use personal experiences

when possible. If you're responding to a story or letter, try

to mail your letter within a few days. For a one-page tip sheet

on effective letters to the editor, send a note to Susan Anderson,

Ag Information, sander@iastate.edu.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

TEN MYTHS ABOUT POPULATION PROBLEMS

In the April issue of Discover magazine, population expert Joel

Cohen writes on 10 major myths about population: 1. Population

grows exponentially. 2. Scientists know how many people there

will be 25, 50, 100 years from now. 3. There is one single factor

limiting how many people the earth will support. 4. Population

problems can be solved by space colonization. 5. Technology can

solve all problems. 6. The U.S. has no population problem. 7.

The population problems of other countries do not impact the U.S.

8. The Catholic church is responsible for population problems.

9. Plagues, famines and wars are nature's way of solving population

problems. 10. The solution to population problems is a women's

issue and women hold the responsibility for solving it.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

EACH GENERATION SHAPES THE MIND OF THE TEACHER

"Each generation is taught by an earlier generation. The

moment we forget this we begin to talk nonsense about education

. . . No generation can bequeath to its successor what it has

not got . . . We shall all admit that a man who knows no Greek

himself cannot teach Greek to his form: but it is equally certain

that a man whose mind was formed in a period of cynicism and disillusion,

cannot teach hope or fortitude." From "God in the Dock:

Essays on Theology and Ethics" by C.S. Lewis, 1970.

M A R G I N A L I A

AMAZING GRACE THE GOAT

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. has hired Genzyme Transgenics Corp. to

produce an experimental anti-cancer drug. It will be a byproduct

of the milk from a genetically engineered goat named Grace. While

still an embryo, scientists inserted a special gene into Grace

that can "piggyback" on the normal milk production mechanism.

The gene instructs the goat's mammary glands to produce a monoclonal

antibody that delivers chemotherapy drugs directly to cancer tumors.

Statistically, mating the goats that produce the drugs should

produce 50 percent of offspring with similar capabilities. (Wall

Street Journal, April 9)

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