Issue: 37

COLLEGE NEWS

- Convocation canceled; honorees recognized in fall

- Feb. 21 breakfast for college FFA students

- Register for successful grantsmanship workshop

- Spanish/Latin American culture class offered

- In-country coordinator sought for Ukraine

- Growing percentage of female ag undergrads

- Sustainable agriculture seminar series

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Transformation of the Web coming

INFOGRAZING

- Problem solvers taking cues from nature

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Reach the high-water mark each day

MARGINALIA

- Something fishy

C O L L E G E N E W S

CONVOCATION CANCELED; HONOREES RECOGNIZED IN FALL

The College of Agriculture spring convocation, which was canceled

last month due to a snowstorm, will not be rescheduled. Awards

that would have been announced at the convocation will be presented

during an Ag Cabinet meeting. Recognition of others who received

awards or honors during the year will be made at the fall convocation.

FEB. 21 BREAKFAST FOR COLLEGE FFA STUDENTS

National FFA Week is Feb. 17-24. To recognize the College of Agriculture's

FFA students, faculty and staff are invited to the FFA Breakfast

at 7:30 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 21, second floor of Curtiss Hall.

REGISTER FOR SUCCESSFUL GRANTSMANSHIP WORKSHOP

Register by Feb. 21 for the "From Theory to Measurement:

Hypothesis Development and Research Design" workshop, scheduled

for Feb. 26, 7-9 p.m. in the Campanile Room, Memorial Union. Space

is limited. To register, contact Carla Persaud (cpersaud@iastate.edu

or 4-9376) or Kathy Kuehl (kkuehl@iastate.edu or 4-1242). The

workshop is part of the Successful Grantsmanship Series sponsored

by the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station

and the College of Veterinary Medicine.

SPANISH/LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE CLASS OFFERED

ISU's colleges of agriculture and veterinary medicine and the

Institute for International Cooperation on Animal Biologics are

offering a Spanish language and Latin American culture class for

their faculty and staff. The beginning-level class will be held

4:30-6 p.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, March 19 -

May 9, at the College of Veterinary Medicine. For an application

and more information, contact Mary de Baca, 4-1851 or mmdb@iastate.edu.

Application deadline is Feb. 29.

IN-COUNTRY COORDINATOR SOUGHT FOR UKRAINE

International Agriculture Programs is seeking a graduate student

or faculty member to be the in-country coordinator for the ISU/National

Agriculture University of Ukraine Linkage Project in Ukraine.

The position will run 3-6 months. For more information, contact

Mary de Baca, 4-1851.

GROWING PERCENTAGE OF FEMALE AG UNDERGRADS

Of the College of Agriculture undergraduates enrolled last fall,

36 percent were women -- 963 of 2,654. (For all of ISU, 43 percent

were women.) Ten years ago, women made up about 19 percent of

college undergrads. Since 1988 there has been a cumulative increase

of 759 undergraduates in the college; 542 of them have been women,

according to Agriculture Student Services.

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE SEMINAR SERIES

The College of Agriculture and the Leopold Center for Sustainable

Agriculture are presenting a semester-long seminar series on Iowa's

role in food production in the year 2020. See "Deadlines

& Reminders" for upcoming topics. For more information,

contact Jim Russell, 4-4631.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Feb. 15: National Food Production Concerns: Stable Food and Stable

Agriculture - Dennis Keeney, Leopold Center, 4:10 p.m., 2050 Agronomy

(sustainable agriculture seminar)

Feb. 21: FFA Breakfast, second floor, Curtiss Hall, 7:30 a.m.

Feb. 22: What Does the Iowa Public Want from the State's Agricultural

Industries in 2020? - Paul Lasley, sociology, 4:10 p.m., 2050

Agronomy (sustainable agriculture seminar)

Feb. 26: From Theory to Measurement: Hypothesis Development and

Experimental Design, a Successful Grantsmanship workshop, 7-9

p.m., Campanile Room

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

TRANSFORMATION OF THE WEB COMING

Futurist Paul Saffo predicts the transformation of the Web in

the next 12 months: "The Web as we know it today is dead.

It's dead in two ways: because it's going to mutate into something

else very quickly and be unrecognizable within 12 months, and

secondly, it's dead because all it's got on it is dead information

. . . Sure, there are links, but the links just lead to more dead

information. It's a big information mausoleum . . . If you think

about it, it's really quite bizarre. You dial into a Web page.

There may be a thousand other people at that page. But the only

way you even know anyone else is there is that the server is slow.

The next big change is going to be finding ways to put qualities

that we associate with MUDs (interactive computer games) today

into Web pages so that you can interact with people." (Upside,

February)

I N F O G R A Z I N G

PROBLEM SOLVERS TAKING CUES FROM NATURE

Scientists are looking to nature-based models for new ideas on

problem-solving. An example: most computer virus detection programs

do their virus-scouting by checking against a database of known

viruses, but new viruses are being created all the time. A University

of New Mexico computer scientist decided to take a lesson from

the human immune system, which uses a process to develop T-cells

that are highly sensitive to foreign cells invading the system.

The computer program does the same thing, resulting in strings

of computer code that are ultra-vigilant against the introduction

of "foreign" code. When the software encounters something

unfamiliar, a window pops up on the screen that says, "A

change has been detected." The software then identifies the

file where the suspected virus is located. "I really believe

that our computer systems are so complicated, we can't use them

effectively till we make them look more like biological systems,"

says the program's creator. (Wall Street Journal, Jan. 16)

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

REACH THE HIGH-WATER MARK EACH DAY

"I believe that any man's life will be filled with constant

and unexpected encouragements if he makes up his mind to do his

level best each day of his life; that is, if he tries to make

each day reach as nearly as possible the high-water mark of pure,

unselfish, useful living." Booker T. Washington. (From the

winter issue of the USDA's Office of Small-Scale Agriculture newsletter.)

M A R G I N A L I A

SOMETHING FISHY

A new mind-soothing concept from Japan: laser disc images of goldfish

that glide around a high-definition screen, while a thin water

tank and air pump attached to the front and sides of the monitor

provide the illusion of reality. NEC will market the system to

hotels, hospitals and other facilities. (Popular Science, January)

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