Issue: 35

COLLEGE NEWS

- New chair named for plant pathology

- Interim coordinator named for off-campus programs

- Beginning Farmer Alliance begins this month

- Second symposium set on student communications

- Giving to the College of Agriculture

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Need to know, nice to know, don't need to know

INFOGRAZING

- Ag ranks high in ISU sponsored funding, FY95

- Outlook for higher education in '96 legislature

- Government shutdown affects many researchers

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Land-grant final report due this spring

MARGINALIA

- Spy viruses: Is your software registered?

- The Schwarzenegger Virus: It'll be back

C O L L E G E N E W S

NEW CHAIR NAMED FOR PLANT PATHOLOGY

Ed Braun has been named chair of the Department of Plant Pathology.

He succeeds Tom Harrington, who completed a five-year term and

will now teach and conduct research in the department. Braun,

who will serve a three-year term, has been a faculty member at

ISU since 1977.

INTERIM COORDINATOR NAMED FOR OFF-CAMPUS PROGRAMS

Harold Crawford has been named interim coordinator for the Off-Campus

Professional Agriculture (PROAG) Programs. Crawford, a professor

in the Department of Agricultural Education and Studies, will

fulfill part of the duties of David Doerfert, who has left ISU

to work for the National FFA Foundation. Crawford will work on

new strategies for more effectively reaching off-campus students

and fulfilling their educational needs. PROAG offers bachelor

of science and master of agriculture degrees.

BEGINNING FARMER ALLIANCE BEGINS THIS MONTH

Later this month a new program to help beginning farmers improve

their management skills and develop networks with other farmers

gets underway. The Beginning Farmer Alliance, a non-degree program,

replaces the Winter Ag Studies Program, which is being offered

for the last time this winter. Besides ISU, partners in providing

the new program's seminars and workshops are Iowa community colleges,

Iowa Young Farmers Association and the Iowa Department of Education.

For more information: Larry Trede, coordinator, 4-4076.

SECOND SYMPOSIUM SET ON STUDENT COMMUNICATIONS

College of Agriculture faculty are invited to the second of three

symposia on improving students' communications skills. It will

be held noon-1 p.m., Feb. 7, and repeated 3:30-4:30 p.m., Feb.

8, both in 3140 Agronomy. Ed Braun, John Schafer and Tom Polito

will present communications assignments from their courses. Also

included will be examples, materials and tips on using a poster

presentation project to teach course materials and designing a

semester-long project that produces a report for a client. Coffee

and cookies will be provided at both sessions. Brownbag lunches

are welcome on Feb. 7. For more information or to discuss improving

students' communication, contact David Russell, 4-4724, or drrussel@iastate.edu.

The third and final symposium in the series will be held April

3-4.

GIVING TO THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

Giving to the College of Agriculture totals $3,364,000 for the

first six months of 1995-96, according to the Agriculture Development

Office. Giving includes cash, trusts, bequests, property and other

kinds of gifts. The Ag Development Office also has confirmation

of more than $8 million in deferred commitments (trusts, wills,

etc.) to the college. The following are ISU Foundation figures

on annual giving to the college for the past five years: 1994-95

- $2,885,803; 19 $4,401,960; 19 $8,168,477; 1991-92

- $3,072,311; 19 $3,920,778.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Jan. 18: College of Agriculture spring convocation, Lush Auditorium,

4 p.m.

Jan. 31: Applications due, Dean of Agriculture's International

Agricultural Competitiveness and Sustainability Grants, 104 Curtiss

Jan. 31: Nominations due, Ag Student of the Year, Iowa Agriculturist,

16H Hamilton

Feb. 7: Improving Students' Communications Skills Symposium, noon-1

p.m., 3140 Agronomy

Feb. 8: Improving Students' Communications Skills Symposium, 3:30-4:30,

3140 Agronomy

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

NEED TO KNOW, NICE TO KNOW, DON'T NEED TO KNOW

When you are the expert, you have so much information you may

have the tendency to want to share it all when speaking to an

audience. But we need to learn to limit our presentations because

listeners will only absorb a certain amount before they begin

to tune us out. That means we need to get to our key points early,

and often. Use a three-point checklist -- need to know, nice to

know, don't need to know -- to prioritize your information and

make sure you're not giving your audience more than they want

or need.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

AG RANKS HIGH IN ISU SPONSORED FUNDING, FY95

Several agricultural organizations were among the top 15 business/corporation

sponsors awarding funds to ISU in FY95, according to the Office

of Contracts and Grants. Number one was the Iowa Soybean Promotion

Board, $1,622,335; second, American Soybean Association, $532,259;

fifth, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., $383,531; sixth, Iowa

Corn Promotion Board, $306,743; seventh, National Pork Producers

Council, $287,937; ninth, Iowa Pork Producers Association, $246,136;

thirteenth, Ciba-Geigy, Inc.; fourteenth, Quaker Oats, $188,530.

OUTLOOK FOR HIGHER EDUCATION IN '96 LEGISLATURE

The Jan. 5 Chronicle of Higher Education previewed the outlook

for higher education in the 50 state legislatures. In Iowa, "lawmakers

and university officials frequently clash over academic freedom

and political activism, but they usually come together on the

budget. A projected surplus in state funds is expected to smooth

the way for colleges to receive much of their requested increases

. . . Some form of school-to-work legislation is likely to win

approval, (and) if it does, community-college officials expect

their institutions to help provide programs, internships and continuing

education . . . Private colleges want an additional $4.6 million

for the Iowa Tuition Grant Program; they received $35.4 million

last year. They also want the Legislature to raise the maximum

grant to $3,275 from $2,900."

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN AFFECTS MANY RESEARCHERS

How has the federal government shutdown, and continuing threat

of a shutdown, affected scientific research? According to a Jan.

5 National Science Foundation release, the NSF receives about

240 research and education proposals and makes about 80 awards

on an average day. Each day of the shutdown represents lost or

delayed support to some 200 people. Dozens of NSF proposal review

meetings and workshops have been cancelled or are threatened.

Continuing grants that have expired (such as the second or third

year of three-year grants) have not been paid; 156 such grants

expired on Dec. 31 and another 266 will expire Jan. 31.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

LAND-GRANT FINAL REPORT DUE THIS SPRING

"Land-grant colleges of agriculture must take a hard view

of what they now do and eliminate the redundancies and contradictions

I see at many of the institutions," says Anthony Earl, chairman

of the National Research Council's Board of Agriculture. The board

will release in late spring a final report examining the land-grant

university system. The report will recommend public policy and

institutional changes that "enhance the colleges' ability

to serve the national interest." Earl suggests many schools

need to reemphasize teaching programs; perhaps pool research talent

to establish "one research center among several land grants

rather than every land grant with many research programs";

and give Extension an expanded role -- rural development and rural

health care are two ideas he tosses out. (From Alan Guebert's

syndicated column, which appeared in the Dec. 31 Waterloo Courier.)

M A R G I N A L I A

SPY VIRUSES: IS YOUR SOFTWARE REGISTERED?

Syndicated columnist Gina Smith predicts a proliferation of computer

"spy" viruses similar to Microsoft Windows 95's registration

wizard that can zip around your CPU and determine whether you've

legally registered all the software you've got loaded on there.

"It's already possible to do this sort of scanning without

alerting the user, so it doesn't take much of a futurist to imagine

the same sort of stealth technology being used on unknowing bulletin

board and Internet users. In fact, I think a trend away from juvenile-prank

computer viruses to information-seeking 'spy' viruses isn't merely

likely, it's inevitable." (Popular Science, December)

THE SCHWARZENEGGER VIRUS: IT'LL BE BACK

New computer viruses, from a tongue-in-cheek list pulled off the

Internet: The Politically Correct Virus: prefers to call itself

an "electronic microorganism." The Star Trek Virus:

invades your system in places where no virus has gone before.

The Ted Turner Virus: colorizes your monochrome monitor. The Texas

Virus: makes sure it's bigger than any other file. The Adam &

Eve Virus: takes a couple bytes out of your Apple.

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