Issue: 342

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COLLEGE NEWS
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ISU’S MANRRS NAMED NATIONAL CHAPTER OF THE YEAR
Iowa State’s Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) chapter was named the national Chapter of the Year over the weekend at the MANRRS 20th annual Career Fair and Conference in Pittsburgh. The chapter’s presentation focused on its many community service activities including participating in Habitat for Humanity, building a playground, canned food and clothing drives and cleaning the Curtiss Hall auditorium weekly. Also at the conference, Aaron Jeffries, agronomy, was re-elected national president for graduate students of MANRRS.

GLANVILLE NAMED MID-CENTRAL ASAE ENGINEER OF YEAR
Tom Glanville, agricultural and biosystems engineering, was named the Engineer of the Year at the Mid-Central American Society of Agricultural Engineering (ASAE) meeting in St. Joseph, Mo., April 1-2.

KOENIG INDUCTED INTO RURAL BUILDERS HALL OF FAME
Bill Koenig, an engineer with MidWest Plan Service located in the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, was inducted into the Rural Builders Hall of Fame at the recent meeting of the National Frame Builders Association.

FACULTY, STAFF INVITED TO FFA BARBECUE
The Ag Ambassadors group invites you to the College of Agriculture barbecue April 18 at this year’s State FFA Convention. The dinner will showcase the college to the thousands of Iowa FFA members. There are nearly 3,000 FFA members and advisers pre-registered for the event. There is no charge for barbecue. It will be from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Kildee Hall Farm Bureau Pavilion.

LEARNING-CENTERED CLASSROOMS SUBJECT OF WORKSHOP
"Introduction to Learning-Centered College Classrooms," is the title of a four-day workshop, to be held May 9 to 12. Sessions will 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in 233 Science II. It is open to educators interested in expanding learner-centered approaches to helping students learn are welcome. Newer faculty and teaching assistants are encouraged to attend. Materials, meals and break snacks provided at no expense. Participants must attend all sessions. Enroll by contacting Sherri Larson at 4-0598 or selarson@iastate.edu by April 22. The workshop is sponsored by a grant from the College of Agriculture. Questions: Steve Jungst at 4-1587 or sejungst@iastate.edu.

ISU ALUMNI, FRIENDS WILL RECEIVE TOP AWARDS APRIL 8
Ten individuals and a corporation will receive the top awards for Iowa State alumni and friends during a public ceremony April 8. The Distinguished Awards Ceremony will feature the presentation of several university awards, given through both the ISU Alumni Association and the ISU Foundation. Among the honorees is Lloyd Anderson, Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture and animal science professor. Details: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2005/apr/dac.shtml

ISU EXTENSION LEADER TO RETIRE
Stanley Johnson, vice provost for ISU Extension and an internationally acclaimed agricultural economist, has announced he will retire later this year. Johnson has served as vice provost for Extension since 1996 and professor of economics since 1985. He is a Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture. Prior to his appointment as head of Extension, Johnson was director of the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development. Details: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2005/mar/johnson.shtml

RISING FUEL PRICES AND IOWA FARMERS
Leopold Center associate director Mike Duffy and ISU Extension economist Darnel Smith have examined the impact of fuel price increases on agricultural production in Iowa. One scenario that assumes a 25 percent increase in fuel costs would raise variable costs for corn production by 10 percent and total costs by 5 to 6 percent, and variable costs for soybean production by 6 percent and total costs by 2 percent. Using a scenario in which fuel prices go up 50 percent, variable costs of production for corn and soybeans would rise 18 and 10 percent, respectively, and fixed costs would rise 10 and 4 percent, respectively. A paper with the full analysis is on the Leopold Center web site at: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/pubs/staff/files/energy_impact0405.pdf.

2005 STANIFORTH LECTURE IN WEED SCIENCE APRIL 13
An upcoming lecture will address the potential development of "superweeds" and other possible outcomes from the unintended spread of engineered plant genes. Norman Ellstrand, professor of genetics and director of the Biotechnology Impacts Center at the University of California in Riverside, will present the 2005 Staniforth Lecture at 4:10 p.m. April 13 in Room 164 Lagomarcino Hall. Details: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/2005releases/staniforth.html

BIOTECH POLICIES AND SAFEGUARDS DISCUSSED APRIL 19
Issues surrounding the safe production of genetically modified foods will be discussed by leading experts at the second annual symposium of Iowa State's Biosafety Institute for Genetically Modified Agricultural Products (BIGMAP), April 19. Learn more: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2005/apr/biosafety.shtml

TRANSITIONING TO ORGANIC WORKSHOP APRIL 16 IN KALONA
A workshop to discuss the transition from conventional to organic production will be held April 16 at the Kalona Family Cupboard Restaurant in Kalona. The workshop is intended for farmers who are considering a move to organic production. Details: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/newsrel/2005/mar05/mar0524.html

BRAZIL EXPERIENCE WILL AID IN ASIAN SOYBEAN RUST IDENTIFICATION
Seeing Asian soybean rust first-hand may aid in its identification this growing season. In February, eight Iowa State crop specialists and six members of the Iowa Soybean Rust Team took a trip to Brazil to observe soybean rust in the field. Learn more: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/2005releases/rustrip.html

IOWA'S SOYBEAN GROWERS AWARE OF DISEASE
The National Agricultural Statistics Service annual survey indicates that 94 percent of Iowa farmers who intend to plant soybeans are aware of Asian soybean rust. Greg Tylka, coordinator of the ISU Corn and Soybean Initiative, said the survey indicates the Iowa Soybean Rust Team is meeting its goal to keep Iowa farmers informed. Details:
http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/2005releases/rustaware.html

IOWA STATE TO HOST IOWA RURAL AGING CONFERENCE APRIL 6
Iowa is ranked fourth highest in the percentage of residents aged 65 or older and second highest in those aged 85 or older. “The question of how living in rural places affects the quality of life among older adults is of great importance to Iowans,” said John Krout, keynote speaker for Iowa State University's conference, "The Future of Rural Aging: What It Means for Iowa." The conference will be Wednesday in the Scheman Building. Learn more: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2005/mar/ruralage.shtml

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS
April 5: Gamma Sigma Delta awards banquet, 5 p.m., Sun Room, Memorial Union
April 6: Speech and panel discussion, Robert Gronski, policy coordinator for the national Catholic Rural Life Conference, 8 p.m., 1148 Gerdin
April 7-9: Iowa State chapter of Alpha Zeta hosts the National Biennial Conclave and National Agriculture Leadership Conference, Comfort Inn, Ames
April 12: Science in Ag Day workshop, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., http://www.agstudent.iastate.edu/biorenewables/biorenewables.htm

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COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK
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AVOID IMPACT AS A VERB . . . UNLESS YOU’RE A DENTIST
The way many people use “impact” in their speech and writing just doesn’t sound right. Some people cringe at the use of impact as a verb; in fact, 84 percent of the Usage Panel of the American Heritage Book of English Usage disapproves of the use of impact as a transitive verb. According to Jack Lynch’s online grammar guide: “The only thing that can be impacted is a wisdom tooth.” Lynch asserts: “Impact should remain a noun; a proposal can have an impact, but cannot impact anything without degenerating into jargon.” To learn more: http://emms-ws12.exnet.iastate.edu/ace/grammar.php.

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INFOGRAZING
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PANEL WILL LOOK AT WOMEN’S CAREERS
A panel discussion with women from nontraditional careers will take place Wednesday, April 6. “Rewards and Challenges: Career Development For Women In Academics And Industry” will include Alicia Carriquiry, statistics; Francine Battaglia, mechanical engineering; Sue Hoover of Pioneer Hi-Bred International; Cathy Kling, economics; and Helle Bunzel, economics. It will be held from 4 to 5:30 p.m., 236 Memorial Union. The session is sponsored by Women’s Enrichment Fund Mini-Grant Program.

NORTH CENTRAL TEACHING SYMPOSIUM NEXT MONTH
The 2005 North Central Region Teaching Symposium will be hosted by Kansas State University May 23-25. The theme for the symposium is "Experiential Learning: Design Through Assessment." Emphasis will be placed on the creation, implementation and assessment of experiential learning activities such as undergraduate research, internships, service learning, case studies and similar active learning, real-world experiences. Diversity and international agriculture will also be covered. Contact: Monica Cohen, Ag Academic Programs, Kansas State University, (785) 532-2632 or mcohen@oznet.ksu.edu.

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EXTERNAL VOICES
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CHURCHILL ON DAYLIGHT-SAVING TIME
"An extra yawn one morning in the springtime, an extra snooze one night in the autumn is all that we ask in return for dazzling gifts. We borrow an hour one night in April; we pay it back with golden interest five months later."
- Winston Churchill

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MARGINALIA
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CHOCOLATE MAY BE GOOD FOR YOU, IF NOT TOO PROCESSED
Cocoa powder contains more beneficial antioxidants than other chocolate products, according to a study by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their cooperators interested in the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of six chocolate and cocoa products. They found processing decreases antioxidant contents. Natural (unsweetened) cocoa powders, Dutch processed (alkalinized) cocoa powders, unsweetened baking chocolates, semi-sweet chocolate baking chips, dark chocolates and milk chocolates were studied. Antioxidants are thought to be effective in helping to prevent cancer, heart disease, and stroke. Natural cocoa powders contained the highest levels of TAC and procyanidins, which were found to be the dominant antioxidant in chocolates. Milk chocolates, which contain the least amount of cocoa solids, had the lowest TAC and procyanidin levels. Baking chocolates contained fewer procyanidins, because they contained more fat than natural cocoa. Alkalinization, used to reduce the acidity and raise the pH of cocoa, such as Dutch chocolates, was found to markedly reduce procyanidin content.

Next issue: April 11

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AG ONLINE
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EDITOR
Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu
Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

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Iowa State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, sex, marital status, disability or status as a U.S. Vietnam Era Veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact the director of Equal Opportunity and Diversity, 3680 Beardshear Hall, (515) 294-7612.

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