Issue: 34

COLLEGE NEWS

- Jan. 12 deadline for Leopold meeting grants

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Emotional intelligence: Inspiration for '96

INFOGRAZING

- Some farm-animal breeds face extinction

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Taking science to the public

MARGINALIA

- Hemp and haute couture

C O L L E G E N E W S

JAN. 12 DEADLINE FOR LEOPOLD MEETING GRANTS

The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture has a quarterly

grants program that supports conferences or workshops relevant

to the center's mission. Grants for up to $2,500 per proposal

are available. Proposals are reviewed by center staff, farmers

and representatives from potential user groups. Friday, Jan. 12,

is the first-quarter deadline for submission of proposals. Conferences

or workshops must take place at least 45 days after the notification

date, which is March 7 for this quarter. For complete details,

request a brochure from the Leopold Center, 209 Curtiss, 294-3711.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Jan. 3: Foreign travel grant applications due, 122 Curtiss

Jan. 5: Iowa Corn Promotion Board meeting on research funding,

Food Sciences Building, 9 a.m.

Jan. 18: College of Agriculture spring convocation, Lush Auditorium,

4 p.m.

Jan. 31: Ag Student of the Year nominations due, Iowa Agriculturist,

16H Hamilton

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE: INSPIRATION FOR '96

Just in case you missed the news stories and debate about "emotional

intelligence," here's a recap that may serve as inspiration

for a New Year's resolution: Researchers are finding that emotional

intelligence -- the ability to get along with others and make

good personal decisions -- counts more than academic intelligence

in achieving a successful life. Daniel Goleman, a Harvard-educated

psychologist and behavioral reporter for the New York Times, says

emotional intelligence involves knowing one's own feelings and

using them to make good decisions; managing feelings to control

stress levels; motivating oneself despite persistent setbacks;

remaining hopeful; delaying gratification; empathizing and maintaining

rapport with others; and cooperating and handling feelings in

relationships. These skills are important even among talented

pools of high-IQ people, where workers who are cooperative, persuasive,

empathetic and can build consensus are consistently valued the

most. (Daniel Goleman, "Emotional Intelligence," Bantam

Books, 1995)

I N F O G R A Z I N G

SOME FARM-ANIMAL BREEDS FACE EXTINCTION

A United Nations report on domestic animal diversity shows that

873 breeds are "at risk," meaning fewer than 1,000 females

or 20 breeding males exist. The report contained the results of

a survey of 3,882 breeds of 28 species of mostly farm animals.

"The goal . . . was to assess the importance of biodiversity

to humankind and point out how we are losing biodiversity at a

truly alarming rate," said R.T. Watson, project chairman

and associate director of the White House Office of Science and

Technology Policy. Experts worry that farmers will have a shrinking

pool of breeds to draw on to keep up with changing environmental

conditions, pests and new diseases. (New York Times, Dec. 7)

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

TAKING SCIENCE TO THE PUBLIC

"(Scientists) should seize opportunities to sit for personal

interviews and to submit letters or articles, geared toward the

general public, that shed light on current issues in which we

have expertise . . . We should ask to visit local schools and

civic organizations for discussions with students and parents,

and we should be prepared to address uncomfortable questions that

may arise about the role of science in modern life . . . None

of what I have suggested is familiar behavior or comfortable territory

for the typical scientist. But then, science is about challenging

the comfortable boundaries of knowledge. If science is to regain

significant public and legislative support, we must abandon comfort

and meet the challenge -- now." Richard S. Nicholson, executive

officer, American Association for the Advancement of Science,

writing in the Sept. 8 Chronicle of Higher Education.

M A R G I N A L I A

HEMP AND HAUTE COUTURE

Middle America is catching on to a trend that's becoming more

acceptable in other parts of the country: hemp clothing. Once

verboten because of its common origin with marijuana, the cannabis

plant, hemp fabric is now cited for its strength and ease of production.

Though Iowa doesn't have hemp specialty stores like those on the

coasts, more Iowans are ordering hemp clothes from mail-order

companies. A Virginia company, which imports its hemp products

from Europe, says hemp doesn't need pesticides, improves soil

and prevents erosion. (Des Moines Business Record, Dec. 4)

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