Issue: 29

COLLEGE NEWS

- World Food Day teleconference

- World Food Prize: Internet chat

- World Food Prize: Roundtable

- World Food Prize: Youth Institute

- Committee seeks grad students

- Commodity groups fund projects

- Grant advice: Try a chalk talk

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Remembering names

INFOGRAZING

- New hot spot: Rural america

EXTERNAL VOICES

- A view from 1927

MARGINALIA

- Endangered crackers

C O L L E G E N E W S

WORLD FOOD DAY TELECONFERENCE

World Food Day will be observed at ISU on Monday, Oct. 16, through

a satellite teleconference to be broadcast 11 a.m.-2 p.m. in 116

Pearson Hall. "Fighting Hunger: Looking Back, Looking Ahead"

is the theme of the 12th annual World Food Day teleconference.

It will begin with a panel discussion on world hunger, followed

by a film,"Famine Warning and Space Technology vs. Starvation."

During the third hour, those attending can call in questions to

the panel.

WORLD FOOD PRIZE: INTERNET CHAT

The recipient of the 1995 World Food Prize will be announced Monday,

Oct. 16, in Washington, DC. From 10-11 a.m. (Iowa time), an interactive

Internet "chat" session with the laureate will take

place. If you have World Wide Web access, you can participate

by following the link provided on the prize's homepage (http://www.netins.net/showcase/wfp).

The laureate is a scientist who has developed innovative biological

control programs that have prevented famine from striking millions.

WORLD FOOD PRIZE: ROUNDTABLE

After the DC announcement, the World Food Prize laureate will

travel to Des Moines to receive the award. At the State Historical

Building in Des Moines on Wednesday, Oct. 18, the laureate will

participate in a 2:30 p.m. roundtable discussion on sustainable

agriculture and food security with panelists USAID administrator

Brian Atwood, Kenyan Ambassador Benjamin Kipkorir and Nobel Peace

Prize Laureate Norman Borlaug. For more information: Brian Meyer,

294-0706/bmeyer@iastate.edu.

WORLD FOOD PRIZE: YOUTH INSTITUTE

Faculty, staff and students are invited to Room 9 of the Brenton

Center in Curtiss Hall on Thursday, Oct. 19, from 1:30-3:30 p.m.,

to watch a live discussion of global food issues at the second

World Food Prize Youth Institute. The institute -- involving students

and teachers from 30 Iowa high schools, the new World Food Prize

laureate, Nobel Prize recipient Norman Borlaug and others -- will

be broadcast from Camp Dodge to fiber-optic network sites around

the state.

COMMITTEE SEEKS GRAD STUDENTS

The College of Agriculture's Technical Assessment Committee needs

graduate student representatives. The committee oversees the allocation

of student computer fees to departments in the college. It meets

about five times a year. Interested graduate students can contact

Joe Herriges, 294-4964 or at jaherrig@iastate.edu.

COMMODITY GROUPS FUND PROJECTS

Iowa corn, soybean and pork commodity groups have allocated almost

$400,000 to 11 ISU projects in the first of three years of research

on livestock odor and waste management issues. The commodity groups

plan to invest $1.6 million over three years. The Experiment Station

is contributing $100,000 to the first-year projects, which involve

27 scientists in eight departments. Another request for proposals

will take place next year. For more information: Bruce Babcock,

294-5764.

GRANT ADVICE: TRY A CHALK TALK

Here's a tip from vet med researcher Susan Carpenter from an Oct.

2 workshop on successful research grant proposals: Long before

the deadline for a proposal to renew your research funding, schedule

a work-in-progress "chalk talk" with colleagues. It

can give you a fresh perspective on your research and help fill

gaps or flaws in your logic -- all of which can help you construct

a successful proposal. The workshop, attended by 74, was the first

in a "Successful Grantsmanship Series." Workshop handouts

are available: Sue Lamont, 294-3629 / sjlamont@iastate.edu or

Prem Paul, 294-0913 / pspaul@iastate.edu.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Oct. 16 -- World Food Day teleconference, 116 Pearson, 11 a.m.

Oct. 19 -- World Food Prize Youth Institute, aired in 9 Curtiss,

1:30 p.m.

Oct. 25 -- Summer-session course offering materials for Schedule

of Classes due, 23 Curtiss

Nov.- Ag Week at ISU

Nov. 7 -- Ag Career Day, Memorial Union

Nov.- National FFA Convention, Kansas City

Nov. 9 -- Leopold Center proposals due, 209 Curtiss

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

REMEMBERING NAMES

In the 1930s, sales guru Dale Carnegie preached that "a person's

name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in

any language." Demonstrating that Carnegie was right, three

marketing professors recently conducted a research project which

has concluded that "remembering someone's name facilitates

persuasion, measured through compliance with a request made of

the person remembered." The lesson? Don't say: "Vote

for me!" Say "Vote for me, John and Suzanne!" Well,

of course we will, if you put it like that. (Journal of Consumer

Research, September 1995)

I N F O G R A Z I N G

NEW HOT SPOT: RURAL AMERICA

Pastoral surroundings combined with advanced telecommunications

technologies and an increase in "virtual offices" is

reversing decades of migration to the cities. Since 1988, job

growth in nonmetropolitan areas has outpaced urban areas, particularly

in communities with a strong technological infrastructure. Population

in rural counties has increased overall at a 1 percent annual

growth rate, triple the rate of the '80s. With more people comes

more money: income for rural residents has grown an average of

5.1 percent annually since 1990, reversing a 20-year trend of

negative wage growth. And numbers of telecommuters have grown

from 2 million in 1988 to 11 million today. (Business Week. Oct.

9)

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

THE VIEW FROM 1927

"The United States Department of Agriculture, our state agricultural

colleges and experiment stations and the trained men known as

county farm advisers or county agents, through precept and demonstration,

are rapidly eliminating the element of chance in producing crops

and livestock, and, in addition, are establishing home conveniences

to deaden the sting of lonesomeness, make drudgery a stranger

and transform the rural home into a haven of delight and comfort."

From items gleaned from the past 100 years of The Furrow, which

appeared in the magazine's October issue. This item was from 1927.

M A R G I N A L I A

ENDANGERED CRACKERS

Eating endangered species, according to Nabisco, is the best way

to save them. The company has released its limited edition Endangered

Collection of Barnum's Animal Crackers, featuring 15 endangered

animals. Nabisco plans to donate five cents for each box sold

to the World Wildlife Fund. Did it occur to someone that there's

something weird about eating these animals? "Of course,"

says Greg Price, Nabisco product manager. "What do people

like about animal crackers? Biting off the heads! Our hope was

that children will line them up, match them with the names on

the box, learn about them and then decapitate them." (New

York Times Magazine, May 14)

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