Issue: 280

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COLLEGE NEWS
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AN IOWA STATE ANGUS COW TOPS IN NATION FOR BEEF QUALITY
An Angus cow from an Iowa State herd has been ranked first in the nation by the American Angus Association for its genetics, which produces high quality beef. It will be sold Friday, Jan. 16, at the National Western Livestock Show in Denver. The cow was ranked first out of 135,841 Angus cows nationwide. Ultrasound technology helped researchers make breeding selections based on the amount of intramuscular fat, better known as marbling. Marbling creates prime and choice cuts of meat. Gene Rouse, a former animal science professor at Iowa State who is now the president of the Iowa Quality Beef Supply Coop, and Doyle Wilson, a retired Iowa State animal science professor, began researching the use of ultrasound in 1996. More at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/2004releases/angus.html

ENTOMOLOGY HELPS MEDICAL OFFICER IN IRAQ IDENTIFY BUG
Kelly Kyle, Donald Lewis and Ken Holscher of the entomology department received an unusual request last week. They were contacted by a U.S. Air Force medical officer in Iraq asking help in identifying an insect that had bitten a pilot. The pilot was having a severe reaction to the bite and the medical officer was concerned about further complications. The medical officer sent a digital image of the insect to Holscher who determined it was an assassin bug, which can produce an extremely painful bite but shouldn’t lead to complications. The pilot has since recovered. Holscher said the medical officer contacted Iowa State because his father was a former professor.

LEOPOLD CENTER, COMMUNITY COLLEGE TEAM UP FOR SUSTAINABLE AG PROGRAM
Marshalltown Community College has accepted a $25,000 challenge grant from the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture to initiate a two-year sustainable agriculture degree program that will be the first of its kind in the Midwest. The first courses in the Sustainable & Entrepreneurial Agriculture degree program are expected to be offered this fall. The program will train beginning farmers, sharpen skills for existing farmers and help farmers from Iowa’s immigrant communities who would like to enter agriculture. The degree will provide students with experiences in both producing and marketing agricultural products. More at: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/news/mcc_011204.html

ISSUES IN AGRICULTURE LECTURE JAN. 29 ON AG CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Mike Gaul, ag career services director, will talk about career opportunities in agriculture at an Issues in Agriculture presentation Jan. 29. The presentation is part of a lecture series for the yearlong Seasons of Agriculture celebration at Reiman Gardens. It will take place at 7 p.m. in Hughes Auditorium at the Reiman Gardens.

AG GRAD STUDENT TRANSLATES GIFT STORY FOR UKRAINIAN WEEKLY
Mykola Sarazhynskyy, a graduate student in ag business, recently helped translate a story about a gift to Iowa State for “The Ukranian Weekly.” The story was released by the ag communications office and featured Stefan and Kateryna Dwojak's gift of $350,000 to the Ukraine Exchange Program. The exchange program is coordinated by the College of Agriculture through the global programs office. The Ukraine Weekly is published in both English and Ukraine from Parisppany, N.J.

HOOP HOUSE RESEARCH FEATURED IN SARE VIDEO
A video featuring the use of hoop houses to raise pigs is the focus of a Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) video. SARE asked Iowa State staff to shoot the video. Rod Fischer, Brenton Center videographer, shot the video for the piece. Barb McManus, ag communications, and Jerry DeWitt, entomology, helped with the on-site production. Mark Honeyman, animal science, was interviewed about his hoop research. The story appears at 7:42 on: http://www.ocav.usda.gov:8080/ramgen/bmt/sare.rm

CAN CATTLE AND BIRDS CO-EXIST?
A study by Iowa State researchers shows careful pasture management can benefit both cattle and birds. In an effort to link better bird habitat to recreational opportunities, the study also looked at interest among farmers in allowing hunting or other recreational uses on their land. Learn more in “Agriculture in Action” at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/agaction/agaction.php?date=2004-01-08&f...

DON’T WAIT FOR THE GOVERNMENT WHEN IT COMES TO SELLING CATTLE
Since the Dec. 23 announcement of a single positive BSE (commonly known as mad cow disease) case in the United States, there has been discussion of a possible government assistance program. John Lawrence, ISU Extension economist and director of the Iowa Beef Center, cautions producers not to wait on a program that may or may not happen. Details: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/newsrel/2004/jan04/jan0403.html

LAMONT TO SPEAK ON CHICKENS’ DISEASE IMMUNITY
Susan Lamont, animal science, will give a presentation Wednesday, Jan. 14, at the first International Symposium of Genesis Faraday at the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh, Scotland. Lamont was invited to speak about the genetic components of chickens’ response to Salmonella. The goal of the meeting is to bring together experts in both molecular and genetic aspects of immunology from different species. Genesis Faraday is a partnership of academic institutions and industry that works to improve the coordination of the use of genetic and genomic technologies by the livestock breeding and animal health industries.

MENZEL TAKES PERMANENT POST AT USDA
Bruce Menzel, former animal ecology department chair, is the new Fish and Wildlife National Program Leader in the Natural Resources and Environment unit at Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service. He took early retirement from Iowa State to take the new job. Menzel had been serving a one-year Intergovernmental Personnel Act assignment in the same position. He was a faculty member at Iowa State for 33 years, including 17 years as department chair. Menzel earned a bachelor’s degree in zoology from the University of Wisconsin; a master’s in biology from Marquette University; and a doctorate in vertebrate zoology from Cornell University.

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS
Jan. 24: Alternative agriculture workshop, McNay Research and Demonstration Farm. ISU Extension, more: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/newsrel/2003/dec03/dec0325.html
Jan. 27: College Convocation, 3 p.m., Sun Room, Memorial Union

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COMMUNICATION KIOSK
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STEPS TO HELP WITH ‘INFORMATION POLLUTION’
Jakob Nielsen, computer and Web usability expert, offered tips for “cleaning up information pollution” and reducing the estimated hour that employees spend “doing email” each workday:
--Don't check your email all the time. Set aside special breaks between bigger projects to handle email. And turn off the alert that distracts you from tasks.
--Don't use "reply to all" when responding to email. Send follow-up messages only to those people who will actually benefit from the reply.
--Write informative subject lines for your email messages. Assume that the recipient is too busy to open messages with titles like "hi."
--Create a special email address for personal messages and newsletters and check this account once a day, or use filters to sort messages.
--Keep messages short.
More at: http://www.useit.com/alertbox/20040105.html

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INFOGRAZING
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PROPOSALS SOUGHT FOR INFO TECH PROJECTS
The Computation Advisory Committee seeks proposals for projects that will have a broad impact on student computing and represent innovative instructional uses of information technology. About $500,000 in student computer fees are available for computing projects. Proposals are due for college review by Feb. 27. Details: http://www.iastate.edu/~cac_info/CAC_RFP_Rev1.htm

COMMUNITY OF SCIENCE DATABASE TRAINING SET
A workshop on how to use the Community of Science database is scheduled for 1:30 to 3 p.m. Feb. 16 in 115 Ross Hall. The database is available to find funding opportunities, locate colleagues at Iowa State and elsewhere who are working in an area of interest and set up profiles to receive funding information that is relevant to you. For registration information, contact Sreeparna Mitra at mitra@iastate.edu or Diane Meyer at meyerd@iastate.edu. Registration is required by Feb 11. Space is limited.

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EXTERNAL VOICES
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BASE BSE POLICY ON SOUND SCIENCE
“Perhaps the mad cow discovery will lead to good policy decisions based on sound science. But for now, that science does not exist — we simply do not know exactly what we are dealing with. Rushing ahead with bans and slapdash agricultural measures might divert even more attention from the real threats to our health and well-being.”
--Scott C. Ratzan, New York Times Op Ed, Dec. 30. Ratzan is a doctor; editor of "The Mad Cow Crisis: Health and the Public Good;” vice president, government affairs, Europe for Johnson & Johnson; editor-in-chief of the Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives; and holds faculty appointments at several universities.

Next issue: Jan. 20

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AG ONLINE
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EDITORS
Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu, and Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu
Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

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