Issue: 26

COLLEGE NEWS

- The governor visits

- Funding for college programs

- Research Exchange Visits program

- Genetics training grant

- New CommLab location

- Parents and Family Weekend

- Promotion & tenure nominees

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Retreat refresher

- The media: A business relationship

INFOGRAZING

- Labor Day:

- Labor Day: Those spring grads

- Labor Day: Late-summer blip

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Farm families

- Writers on family farms

MARGINALIA

- What died in my keyboard?

C O L L E G E N E W S

THE GOVERNOR VISITS

Governor Terry Branstad visited campus today for an overview of

selected topics in the College of Agriculture. In the Center for

Crops Utilization Research Theater, college faculty briefed the

governor on research and extension/outreach activities concerning

the Farm Bill and agricultural trade opportunities; swine odor,

manure management and soil studies; and swine breeding and genetics.

FUNDING FOR COLLEGE PROGRAMS

At last week's College of Agriculture convocation, Dean Topel

mentioned some programs for which ISU will seek increased funding

in the next state legislative session: a Kildee Hall addition

for improved livestock facilities; expanded efforts to address

economic, social and environmental needs of rural Iowa; and the

Agricultural Chemical Products Laboratory.

RESEARCH EXCHANGE VISITS PROGRAM

An Experiment Station competitive grants program aims to strengthen

research collaborations with historically black land-grant institutions

and tribal colleges. Up to $1,200 per grant is available to support

expenses of College of Agriculture or Experiment Station-funded

faculty in traveling to, or hosting a faculty member from, those

institutions. Application forms are available in department and

center offices. Deadline is Sept. 28. Awards will be announced

Oct. 3. For more information: Susan Lamont, 294-3629 or sjlamont@iastate.edu.

GENETICS TRAINING GRANT

Two pre-doctoral students will study at ISU for three years under

a $108,000 training grant from the USDA National Needs Graduate

Fellowship Program. The grant was awarded to the Plant Genome

Studies and Biotechnology Group (PGSB) in the Interdepartmental

Genetics Graduate Program. PGSB comprises 16 faculty in agronomy,

biochemistry & biophysics, botany, forestry, plant pathology

and zoology & genetics. As part of their training, the students

will collaborate with private-sector researchers in the seed industry.

NEW COMMLAB LOCATION

The Communications Laboratory, now in its second year of operation,

has a new location -- 421 Ross Hall. The CommLab offers individual

assistance to undergraduates taking communication-intensive courses

in the College of Agriculture. Instructors are invited to refer

students to the CommLab for tutoring with communication assignments.

Lee-Ann Kastman, CommLab director, also is available to present

short lessons on communication topics. For more information on

CommLab's services, call Kastman, 294-3053.

PARENT AND FAMILY WEEKEND

Two events during Parent and Family Weekend, Oct. 6-8: The College

of Agriculture reception will be held 10-11:30 a.m., Oct. 7, in

Rooms 220-240, Scheman Building. Also on Oct. 7, faculty and staff

are encouraged to visit alumni at the College of Agriculture Alumni

Society's annual Tent-A-Gate, beginning at 10:30 a.m. in two tents

east of the Olsen Building. The Iowa Pork Producers will serve

a barbecue meal. For $5 advance meal tickets, call 294-4725. A

limited number of tickets will be available the day of the event.

PROMOTION & TENURE NOMINEES

Nominations for three 3-year terms on the college's Promotion

and Tenure Advisory Committee are due Oct. 12 to Marvin Hayenga,

479 Heady. Nominees should have a 50 percent or more college appointment

and should not have any conflict of interest regarding likely

candidates for promotion and tenure in the next year or two. Nominations

should include academic vita and a half-page letter describing

the nominee's qualifications. The departments of sociology, horticulture,

forestry, ag education and studies, entomology and animal ecology

currently have members on the committee and should refrain from

any nominations this year.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Sept. 5 -- Foreign travel grant applications due, 122 Curtiss

Sept. 6 -- Leopold Center preproposals due, 126 Soil Tilth

Sept. 8 -- Faculty improvement leave applications due, 122 Curtiss

Sept. 12 -- Consulting reports for A, B and P staff due, 122 Curtiss

Sept. 28 -- Research Exchange Visits grant applications due, 126

Curtiss

Oct. Parent and Family Weekend

Oct. 12 -- Promotion & tenure committee nominations due, 479

Heady

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

RETREAT REFRESHER

Couldn't make it to the college's recent retreat on improving

communications? Videotapes of the main presentations are now available.

The three-tape sets include a presentation on working with media,

a panel discussion with central Iowa news reporters and a panel

discussion with college stakeholders. Four sets are available

for checkout from Ag Information, 304 Curtiss, 294-5616.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

LABOR DAY: COLLEGE EMPLOYEES

According to ISU's Institutional Research Office, there were 778

College of Agriculture employees in October 1994 (the most current

data available). Faculty, including non-tenure track, numbered

313; professional and scientific staff, 220; and merit staff,

245.

LABOR DAY: THOSE SPRING GRADS

By the time they picked up their diplomas, about 80 percent of

spring college graduates had already accepted employment or decided

to continue their education. Today, it's 90 to 95 percent, says

Roger Bruene, placement director. In general, half of recent grads

have taken jobs in agribusiness. The other half have been equally

divided among three areas: government jobs, farming and going

for another degree.

LABOR DAY: LATE-SUMMER BLIP

Right now the job opportunities are rich for spring grads who

spent the summer traveling or working on the farm or in temporary

jobs, says placement director Roger Bruene. From mid-August to

Oct. 1, an employment "blip" occurs because workers

resign to continue their education; others plan career changes

before their kids return to school; and employers who see their

summer-hire college students leave are looking for new workers.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

FARM FAMILIES

"Farm families know what life is. They see it born, they

see it growing in the fields. Things die in the fall and you have

a dormant time, a rest period, time for the family together."

Denise O'Brien of Atlantic, Iowa, whose family recently quit farming

for economic reasons. From an article on family farms in the July

2 Chicago Tribune.

WRITERS ON FAMILY FARMS

From Maxine Kumin's review of four new books about the family

farm in a recent New York Times Book Review: "Those who get

no closer to the furrow than their weekly sojourn at the roadside

farm stand are susceptible to romantic notions about the purity

of the work ethic, the spiritual rewards of tilling the soil .

. . and being at one with nature. Of course, there ARE ample rewards

to be gained from a life on the land, but they are often realized

in complicated ways . . . Perhaps it is the function of the genre

of writing practiced by these four authors to provide urban dwellers,

hungry for their lost roots in the hayfields and cow barns of

their great-grandparents, with at least a tenuous connection to

the earth and living creatures (and to) alert readers to the stewardship

required if our land and our water are to be rescued . . ."

M A R G I N A L I A

WHAT DIED IN MY KEYBOARD?

Idaho Computing has developed a PC add-in board that uses chemicals

to generate scents on your computer. The ScentMaster mixes three

chemicals to produce the various aromas which are wafted into

the atmosphere via a small spray-emitter module. ScentMaster can

produce 36 distinctive smells, such as "roses," "new

car," "roasted coffee" and "dead animal in

wall." (Internet World, April)

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