Issue: 250

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COLLEGE NEWS
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FRIDAY’S HAILSTORM DAMAGES GREENHOUSES
Hail as large as golf balls caused considerable damage to some campus greenhouses early Friday, May 30. Greenhouse managers report that many experiments will continue until the glass is replaced. Among the worst hit were the agronomy greenhouses between Wallace Road and Pammel Drive, with Facilities Planning and Management estimating a loss of $100,000. The plant pathology greenhouse in the same area lost from a quarter to a half of its glass, about 200 panes. The forestry greenhouse next door only lost about seven panes. Botany’s greenhouse atop Bessey Hall had about seven panes of glass broken, but the nearby greenhouses adjacent to Horticulture Hall lost 80 panes. At the Molecular Biology Building’s greenhouse, the hail only speckled the summer’s white-washing.

COLLEGE STUDENTS HELP IOWA COMMUNITIES THIS SUMMER
Ann Holste, agricultural business senior, is one of 30 ISU undergraduates interning and doing service projects across the state through ISU Extension’s Life in Iowa program. Her experience was recently reported in the Belmond Independent (http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=8071039&BRD=1907&PAG=461&dept_...). There are 34 more students participating in service learning projects, sponsored by 33 counties. Holste is one of 10 interns/service learners and six service learners from the College of Agriculture. Summer projects are identified in collaboration with local residents. Paid summer internships are available for students who work in nonprofit cultural and environmental organizations, social service agencies, community-supported agriculture and small, locally owned businesses that promote entrepreneurial skills. The program’s goal is to cultivate the personal, social and ethical growth of students; encourage students to stay in Iowa to become the next generation of leaders; and develop efforts to create a sustainable quality of life in Iowa communities. More information: http://www.lifelearner.iastate.edu/lifeiniowa.htm

ISU SOCIOLOGY DOCTORATE HOLDERS TO REUNITE
The sociology department will welcome back alumni for a reunion June 13-15. Eight emeritus sociology professors in the Ames area are coordinating the event. About 100 alumni who earned doctorates in the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s were invited. About 32 have confirmed they will attend, while 35 others have sent their regrets. The group will honor retired Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture George Beal, who received his doctorate in 1953, the sixth rural sociology doctorate Iowa State granted. Beal taught at Iowa State from 1947 to 1977. Other activities include campus tours, a dinner and dance. Organizers are developing a timeline of sociology at Iowa State, including milestones and historic pictures. Contact: Jerry Klonglan, 232-9973 or klonglan@iastate.edu.

PFI FRUIT AND VEGETABLE FIELD DAY JUNE 7
Practical Farmers of Iowa and the Iowa Network for Community Agriculture will sponsor their first fruit and vegetable field day from 6 to 9 p.m., June 7, at the farm of Gary and Nancy Guthrie near Nevada. Elizabeth Vogel, an ISU student and a Life in Iowa intern, is working at Growing Harmony Farm this summer and will share her experiences. Sara Helland, ISU assistant scientist in horticulture, will talk about field trials with muskmelons to control cucumber beetle. The Guthries raise more than 30 fruits and vegetables and market them through Growing Harmony Farm CSA (community supported agriculture). To get to the farm, drive two miles east of I-35 on Highway 30, turn right on 580th Ave (R-70) for two miles and turn left on 260th Street. The farm is a third of a mile from the corner on the south side of the road. The address is 58444 260th Street.

SCIENTISTS PREDICT SOYBEAN YIELDS, CONTENT FROM SATELLITES
Iowa State researchers are using aerial and satellite views of soybean fields to predict the yields, and other crop conditions. Plant pathologist Forrest Nutter leads a research team that is developing predictions of the soybean fields’ oil and protein content, fiber content and soybean cyst nematode (SCN) density by ground and aerial readings of reflected light. The group is using satellites to take some of the readings in the near infrared part of the light spectrum. This is the first application and mapping of oil and protein and then comparing the findings with the harvested crop. The research is supported by soybean checkoff funds from the North Central Soybean Research Program and the Iowa Soybean Promotion Board, and by ISU’s Iowa Grain Quality Initiative and Iowa Space Grant Consortium. More at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/2003releases/satellite.html

PARTNERSHIP WITH NATIVE AMERICAN COLLEGES PROGRESSING
A partnership between Native American tribal colleges and state universities is strengthening natural resources education in communities served by the tribal colleges. Iowa State University is the lead institution in this partnership. Learn more in “Agriculture in Action” at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/agaction/agaction.php?date=2003-05-29&f...

TOP GENETIC RESEARCHERS TO ATTEND PSI SYMPOSIUM
The Plant Sciences Institute's fifth annual symposium at Iowa State, June 5-8, will bring together many of the world's leading researchers on plant transposable element research -- a science that has made a major impact on agricultural biotechnology. This year's topic is "Transposition, Recombination and Application to Plant Genomics." More at: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2003/may/psisymp.shtml

BUSY SEASON UNDER WAY FOR STUDENT-RUN ORGANIC FARM
While most college students have closed their textbooks and cleared out their residence hall rooms, one group of Iowa State students is gearing up for their busiest time of year. The 15 students who operate the ISU Student Organic Farm are in the midst of planting potatoes, harvesting radishes and organizing workshops for novice vegetable growers. Learn more: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2003/may/orgfarm.shtml

ZHANG APPOINTED TO ISU VETERINARY MEDICINE'S RAMSEY CHAIR
Veterinary scientist Qijing Zhang, who researches foodborne human pathogens of animal origin, has been appointed the Frank K. Ramsey Endowed Chair in Iowa State’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Zhang joined the Iowa State faculty in April as an associate professor of veterinary microbiology and preventive medicine. He earned his doctoral degree in immunobiology from Iowa State in 1994. Details:
http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2003/may/zhang.shtml

RESEARCHERS STUDY TREES, HOPE TO SLOW GLOBAL WARMING
Two researchers at Iowa State are searching for a way to restore forest systems to help slow the process of global warming. Ann Russell, affiliated assistant professor of natural resource ecology and management, and James Raich, associate professor of botany, will conduct a tree production-based research project in lowland Costa Rica. Learn more: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2003/may/costarica.shtml

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS
June 5-7: World Pork Expo, Iowa State Fairgrounds, Des Moines, more at http://www.worldpork.org/
June 18: Southeast Research and Demonstration Farm field day, 1 p.m., near Crawfordsville
June 19: Armstrong and Lauren Christian Swine Research and Demonstration Farms field day, 3:30 p.m., near Atlantic
June 24-26: 4-H Youth Conference, more at http://www.extension.iastate.edu/newsrel/2003/apr03/apr0308.html
June 24: Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm field day, 1:30 p.m., near Nashua
June 25: Northwest Research and Demonstration Farm field day, 9 a.m., near Sutherland
June 26: Northern Research and Demonstration Farm field day, 9:30 a.m., near Kanawha
July 8: Lauren L. Christian Pork Chop Open, 10 a.m. shotgun start, Veenker Memorial Golf Course; 4 p.m. reception, 5 p.m. dinner with a program, awards and a fund-raising auction following, registration form at http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ipic/events/LCPCO703.pdf

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COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK
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BOOK ENCOURAGES SCIENTISTS TO STUDY WRITING
In his book, “The Chicago Guide to Communicating Science” (2002, University of Chicago Press), Scott Montgomery urges scientists to read the great scientific communicators of the past to find writings worth imitating. He assumes readers of the book know the basics of grammar and hopes scientists will go beyond functional to elegant writing. Chapters in the book outline writing techniques, rewriting, creativity, graphics, technical reports, oral presentations, the Internet and problems for scientists whose native language is not English. A chapter from the book on online writing is available from the publisher: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/534855.html
Source: Writing That Works Newsletter, May 2003

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INFOGRAZING
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DEADLINE APPROACHES FOR NRI SUPPLEMENTAL RESEARCH PROGRAM
June 30 is the deadline for applications to the National Research Initiative 2003 Supplemental, Integrated Program, which gives priority to projects that are multistate, multi-institutional or multidisciplinary; or projects that integrate agricultural research, extension and education. Approximately $30 million is available. A request for applications and application forms are available on the CSREES website:
http://www.reeusda.gov/1700/funding/rfanri_integrated_program_03.htm

TECHNOLOGY SOUGHT TO COMBAT BIOTERRORISM
Anti-terrorism technology is being sought by the Combating Terrorism Technology Support Office. One requirement calls for rapid field identification of agricultural bioterrorism agents at ports of entry and in production agriculture and natural resource environments. This is a "rapid deadline notice" with a June 13 deadline for a one-page proposal. Complete details: https://www.bids.tswg.gov/TSWG/bids.nsf/(BAAView)/24C936C9BBF67CCD85256CDF007C8FC3/$FILE/DAAD_03_T_0024.pdf. Contact: Elena Polush at 4-8493, elenap@iastate.edu.

R&D FOR COMPANIES CHANGES; UNIVERSITIES' EXTERNAL SUPPLIER ROLE
A generation ago, R&D was internally focused. In certain industries, this internally focused approach still works. But in others, the logic underlying the closed innovation paradigm is fundamentally obsolete, because the knowledge landscape has changed. … Thanks to the expansion of universities, the availability of well-trained workers to companies of all sizes, and the increased presence of venture capital, most industries have an abundance of good external suppliers. Companies no longer need to finance their own R&D to offer cutting-edge products; they can buy or license what they need from others. ... But it's a two-edged sword. External suppliers are available to all comers, putting pressure on companies with substantial inventories of R&D projects currently sitting on the shelf. (Darwin Magazine, May 2003, http://www.darwinmag.com/read/050103/open.html)

PARTNERSHIP TO ADVANCE REMOTE SENSING IN AGRICULTURE
A USDA and NASA partnership will utilize earth science such as remote sensing technologies to protect the environment and enhance the agricultural competitiveness of American farmers and ranchers. The USDA will draw on NASA’s scientific and technical information in monitoring, mapping, modeling and systems engineering. The primary purpose of the new effort is to help increase the production efficiency of farmers while continuing to reduce the cost of production by bringing more practical benefits of science and technology into agricultural applications.

Next issue: June 9

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AG ONLINE
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EDITORS
Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu, and Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu
Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

SUBSCRIBE
Ag Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University's College of Agriculture, is e-mailed every Monday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag Online subscribe" to edadcock@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag Online unsubscribe."

Iowa State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, sex, marital status, disability or status as a U.S. Vietnam Era Veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact the Director of Affirmative Action, 1031 Wallace Road Office Building, Room 101, (515) 294-7612.

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