Issue: 246

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COLLEGE NEWS
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FACULTY AND STAFF INVITED TO HONOR GRADUATES
About 511 college seniors are expected to graduate this spring and summer. Faculty and staff are encouraged to join in recognizing the graduates’ achievements at Saturday’s College Convocation. The program begins at 9:30 a.m. in C.Y. Stephens Auditorium. Graduates will be honored individually. Four seniors will receive awards from the Agriculture Student Council: Lisa Jane Elfers, majoring in agricultural business and economics, will receive the Academic Achievement Award; Jeremy Mathew Anhalt, environmental studies and animal ecology major, Distinguished Service Award; Michael Richard Taylor, agricultural studies, Leadership Excellence Award; and Valerie Ann Weis, agricultural business, Outstanding Senior Award. The convocation includes the awarding of a posthumous degree to the family of Donald Jacob Zitterich, agricultural studies, who died in a snowmobile accident Feb. 8.

WINERY IS A WINNING IDEA FOR AGRONOMY STUDENT
Brian Keehner, a graduating senior in agronomy, was one of 10 Iowa State University students awarded a $1,000 scholarship from the Pappajohn Center for Entrepreneurship. Keehner submitted a business plan that outlines his dream for the future -- starting a winery. To gain more experience in viticulture, this summer he will work for the ISU horticulture department in Ames setting up new and maintaining current vineyards. He will also help other ISU research farms establish new vineyards for research purposes. Next fall he plans to enroll in an enology program and possibly work as an apprentice with a winemaker. Keehner hopes to open a winery near McGregor and perhaps become part of wine trail through eastern Iowa. This is the fifth year the scholarships have been awarded through the John and Mary Pappajohn Scholarship Fund.

CORNELL PROFESSOR TO PRESENT SESSIONS THIS WEEK
The Graduate Program in Sustainable Agriculture is sponsoring a seminar and workshop this week featuring Norman Uphoff, director of the Cornell International Institute for Food, Agriculture and Development. He will deliver a lecture, “CIIFAD: An Institutional Framework for International Interdisciplinary Programs,” from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 8. It will be held in the Gold Room, Memorial Union. Uphoff will present a workshop on “Creating Action Plans to Internationalize the Graduate Program in Sustainable Agriculture” from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, May 9, in the Speer Room, Reiman Gardens. Lunch is provided. RSVPs to Paige Knutsen, 4-7175 or pgk@iastate.edu.

VISITING PLANT SCIENTIST HOPES TO CONTACT ISU COLLEAGUES
Christian Jung from the Institute of Crop Science and Plant Breeding at the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Germany, is spending May and June at ISU for a collaborative project with Thomas Baum in plant pathology. Plant Sciences Institute-affiliated faculty members are invited to contact Jung, who would like to meet with other plant scientists and present a seminar on his work. Contact Jung through Baum, 4-2398 or tbaum@iastate.edu. Jung's research areas are listed on his department's web page (http://www.plantbreeding.uni-kiel.de) along with publications and other pertinent information.

GAMMA SIGMA DELTA PRESENTS AWARDS
Gamma Sigma Delta recently presented its annual awards to faculty, staff and students. A Senior Scholarship Award of Merit for was presented to Ely Grote, agronomy. A sophomore scholarship Award of Merit was presented to Seth Schroeder, ag business. Mission Awards of Merit were presented to Steve Jungst, natural resource ecology and management, for teaching; Max Rothschild, Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture, for research; and Beth Ellen Doran, livestock field specialist, for extension. Dennis Keeney, former director of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, was presented the Distinguished Service to Agriculture award.

LEOPOLD CENTER SEEKS RESEARCH, EDUCATION PROJECT IDEAS
The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture is seeking ideas for special research and education projects that will lead to a more sustainable agriculture in Iowa. The Leopold Center has issued two requests for pre-proposals for projects as part of its new initiatives in policy and in marketing and food systems. The RFPs invite researchers and educators associated with educational or nonprofit organizations to submit a brief concept paper describing their project by May 30.

ISU RESEARCHERS SEEK POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN FOR STUDY ON SOY
Scientists at Iowa State are recruiting postmenopausal women for a three-year clinical trial to examine the effectiveness of isoflavones in preventing bone loss associated with menopause. Isoflavones are estrogen-like compounds derived from soybeans. Details: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2003/may/alekel.shtml

RESEARCH SHOWS NEW WAY TO INCREASE VALUE OF COWS
There's good news for cow/calf producers who have cows that are ready to be removed from their production herds. New research by ISU’s Iowa Beef Center shows that placing these cull cows into a feedlot might be more profitable than putting them on pasture or sending them directly to slaughter. Learn more in “Agriculture in Action” at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/agaction/agaction.php?date=2003-05-01&f...

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS
May 10: College convocation for graduating seniors, 9 a.m., C.Y. Stephens Auditorium, family and guests welcome
May 14-16: Alumni Days
May 16: Reception for College alums attending Alumni Days, 9 to 11:30 a.m., Ensminger Room, Kildee Hall
May 12: Iowa State registration deadline, Plant Sciences Institute Symposium on Transposition, Recombination and Application to Plant Genomics to be held June 5-8, more information: http://www.bb.iastate.edu/~gfst/sp433p.html
June 24-26: 4-H Youth Conference, more: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/newsrel/2003/apr03/apr0308.html

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COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK
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TIPS ON WRITING TIGHT
1. Understand that tight writing doesn't just happen.
2. Don't try to write tight on the first draft. The first draft is for organizing what you want to say and putting it roughly into words. Tightening comes in subsequent drafts.
3. Plan to revise at least three times.
4. Have someone else read what you've written to point out ambiguity or suggest cuts.
5. Understand that tighter is always better, but shorter isn't always better. Remember that clarity is always more important than brevity.
From "Brevity Isn't Enough," by Kathy Henning, Harvard Management Communication Letter, February 2003.

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INFOGRAZING
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AIR QUALITY PUBLICATIONS ON THE WEB
Three new air quality publications have been posted on the ISU Extension publications web page. They can be accessed by the following links or through the Air Quality Web site at: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/airquality/:
--EDC 162h Air Quality and Animal Agriculture, http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/EDC162H.pdf
--PM 1936 Air Quality Resources for Iowa Animal Agriculture, http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/PM1936.pdf
--PM 1935 Gaseous Emissions from Animal Agriculture, http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/PM1935.pdf

WILDERNESS COURSES OFFERED FOR ISU CREDIT
The Wild Rockies Field Institute (WRFI), which is part of the University of Montana extended studies program, is offering wilderness immersion courses for credit. Credit earned for these courses transfers to Iowa State. More information is available at http://www.wildrockies.org/wrfi. Need-based scholarships are available and about half of the students who apply for aid receive some assistance. The Iowa State honors office has a catalog and a poster reviewing the courses for this year. For more information: Kathryn Andre, 4-7179 or kandre@iastate.edu.

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EXTERNAL VOICES
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LETTING THE POTATO CHIPS FALL WHERE THEY MAY
“On the surface, there is hardly a more contentious subject in American life than dieting and nutrition. The good thing about the ongoing public controversy over losing weight is that it offers an excuse not to lose weight at all. You can just throw up your hands in confusion — to the shelf with the potato chips. Recently, I decided to do something serious about the way I eat . . . The way to get thin is to get most of your calories from the most nutritous foods, which means leafy green vegetables, fresh fruit, beans and whole grains . . . For me, at least, this is the end of a long evolutionary argument. My inner carnivore has come to terms with my inner herbivore, since both would like to live a little longer. Perhaps in another 25 million years the human race will have evolved to live on trans fats and refined carbohydrates. But a lot of us will have to die first before that happens. It’s the price that evolution demands.”
- Verlyn Klinkenborg, writing in an opinion piece published in today’s (May 5) New York Times

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MARGINALIA
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STUDENT EARNS DEGREE TWO DAYS SHY OF 96TH BIRTHDAY
On Saturday, 95-year-old Don Flickinger earned an associate’s degree he started 75 years before. The Associated Press reported that Flickinger got his degree in technical studies from the University of Toledo. He was the school's oldest graduate. "I am trying to show my great-grandchildren that it's possible, even at my age," he said. Flickinger began taking classes in 1928. When the Depression started, he quit school. He took more classes after he returned to the university in 1966 as an employee. After retiring and traveling, he returned to school two years ago. He plans to go on for a bachelor’s degree.

Next issue: May 12

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AG ONLINE
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EDITORS
Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu, and Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu
Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

SUBSCRIBE
Ag Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University's College of Agriculture, is e-mailed every Monday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag Online subscribe" to edadcock@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag Online unsubscribe."

Iowa State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, sex, marital status, disability or status as a U.S. Vietnam Era Veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact the Director of Affirmative Action, 1031 Wallace Road Office Building, Room 101, (515) 294-7612.

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