Issue: 222

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COLLEGE NEWS

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ROTHSCHILD NAMED IOWA INVENTOR OF THE YEAR

The Iowa Intellectual Property Law Association has named Max Rothschild the 2002 Inventor of the Year. The award is given to an Iowa inventor who has made the most outstanding contribution to Iowa through his or her invention. The award was presented Oct. 25 at a banquet in Amana. Rothschild is a C. F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture in animal science. With students and colleagues, he has invented three gene tests to improve pig litter size. Details: http://www.iastate.edu/%7enscentral/releases/2002/oct/rothschild.shtml

FEHR TO RECEIVE CROP SCIENCE CAREER AWARD

Walter Fehr, C. F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture in agronomy and director of the Office of Biotechnology, is this year's recipient of the Monsanto Crop Science Distinguished Career Award. Fehr will receive the award at the annual meeting of the Crop Science Society of America Nov. 12 in Indianapolis.

RUPRI HONORS KLONGLAN AND OTHER FOUNDERS

Jerry Klonglan, former associate dean, has been honored for his role in creating the Rural Policy Research Institute (RUPRI). Award plaques were presented to Klonglan and others at the University of Missouri and the University of Nebraska who helped create the consortium. The recognition was part of RUPRI’s recent 10th anniversary celebration.

SOIL JUDGING TEAM SECOND IN REGIONAL CONTEST

The Iowa State Soil Judging Team placed second in the American Society of Agronomy competition Oct. 3. Agronomy senior Jay Jung of Charles City scored top individual honors over the 41 other contestants. Besides Jung, team members were Erik Christian, agronomy junior; Terri Howard, freshman in entomology and agronomy; and Brett Peelen, agronomy sophomore. All four placed in the top 10 individually. The team also qualified for the national contest to be hosted by Texas A&M next year. Jon Sandor, agronomy professor, and Skye Wills, agronomy graduate student, coach the team.

MICROARRAY FACILITY OPEN HOUSE TUESDAY

The Center for Plant Genomics Microarray Facility will host an open house and demonstration from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, in B546 Agronomy. A demonstration of the instruments used and the services provided will include hybridization, image scanning, program design and training. Service contracts in the facility are supported in part by a USDA training grant and the Office of Biotechnology.

NEW SPECIALIST IN COLLEGE BUDGET & FINANCE OFFICE

Amy Rogers is a new administrative specialist in the College of Agriculture’s Budget and Finance office. She will work with the extension budget and pick up some duties from Barb Martin, who is reducing her schedule to 60 percent time on Nov. 1. Rogers also will work with the Leopold Center budget after Ken Anderson, the center’s account specialist, leaves his position on Dec. 31.

OCT. 30 MINI-CONFERENCE LOOKS AT E-PORTFOLIOS

Gene Takle, agronomy, and Tom Brumm, agricultural and biosystems engineering, will be presenters Wednesday, Oct. 30, in a mini-conference on using electronic portfolios for student assessment. The meeting runs from 8:30 a.m. to noon in Studio B in the Communications Building. “Electronic Portfolios and Student Learning,” sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence, Instructional Technology Center and the Office of Academic Information Technologies, is free for ISU faculty and staff. Takle and Brumm will be part of a panel discussion on existing and potential uses of e-portfolios. Registration is required: http://www.itc.iastate.edu/ePortfolios.html

CENSUS FIGURES SHOW SHIFTS IN IOWA'S POPULATION

Numbers of urban, rural and farm residents were among the data recently released from the 2000 U.S. Census. A brief report from Census Services, a unit in the College of Agriculture, summarizes the numbers and compares them to similar figures gathered since 1940. Learn more in “Agriculture in Action”: http://ww1.ag.iastate.edu/cgi-bin2/aginfo/agaction/agaction.pl?date=2002...

ISU CROP ADVISER INSTITUTE OFFERS CONTINUING EDUCATION

The Crop Adviser Institute is offering interactive continuing education modules for crop advisers certified through the American Society of Agronomy. In 1993, the ASA created the certification program for certified crop advisers. Since then more than 14,000 individuals have been certified. To maintain certification, crop advisers are required to earn 40 continuing education units every two years. Faculty associated with the Brenton Center for Agricultural Instruction and Technology Transfer recognized the need for more flexibility in providing CEUs. Details: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/cropadv.html

DIRECTOR: LEOPOLD CENTER'S WORK CRITICAL NOW

The work of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture may be more critical now than in 1987 when legislators created the research center, its director told supporters Oct. 21 in Des Moines. In remarks to a group of 180 persons attending a dinner to celebrate the work of the center, Fred Kirschenmann outlined the center's plans to address the problems facing today’s agriculture by focusing on programs to develop new markets for farmers, research to better understand local ecosystems and public policy. Last spring, state budget cuts resulted in a $1 million transfer from the center's primary source of revenue. Plans for a fundraising effort for the center, to be conducted by the ISU Foundation, were announced at the dinner, which was organized by the National Catholic Rural Life Conference and other organizations with interests in the environment and agriculture. During the dinner, Kirschenmann and the center were presented with an award to recognize leadership in sustainable agriculture research and on developing models for food self-sufficiency.

ISU PLANT SCIENCES INSTITUTE BOARD NAMED

Thirteen leaders of agricultural industry, plant sciences research, commodity groups and government have been named to the board of the Plant Sciences Institute. The board held its inaugural meeting Oct. 22. College of Agriculture Dean Catherine Woteki is a member of the board. See the complete list of members: http://www.iastate.edu/%7enscentral/releases/2002/oct/psiboard.shtml

HERBACEOUS PERENNIAL CONFERENCE SET NOV. 8-9

The horticulture department’s annual Herbaceous Perennial Conference will be a two-day event split between Davenport and Ames. The Nov. 8 session is at the River Center in Davenport; the Nov. 9 program is at the Scheman Building. Speakers include well-known gardeners, a nursery owner and director of ornamental plant research at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Also scheduled to speak is William Graves, horticulture professor. For more information: http://www.lifelearner.iastate.edu/1102/herb.htm

THE HORROR, THE HORROR: INSECTS INVADE MEMORIAL UNION

Iowa State’s annual insect horror film festival will be held at 6 p.m., Friday, Nov. 1, in the Sun Room, Memorial Union. The event is free. The festival provides information about insects and how humans relate to them. The Entomology Club organizes the festival. From 6 to 7:30 p.m., attendees can taste insect treats such as cricket brittle and corn borer corn bread. They also can see displays on insects and spend time with giant millipedes, Madagascar hissing cockroaches, hornworm caterpillars and tarantulas from the ISU Insect Zoo. At 7:30 p.m., the animated movie “A Bug's Life” will be shown.

IOWA PORK INDUSTRY CENTER FUNDS SIX PROJECTS

Sow gestation feeder design, feed additive comparison and manure utilization are among the six projects receiving a total of $17,400 from the Iowa Pork Industry Center. The projects will be led by extension field specialists. Details: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/newsrel/2002/oct02/oct0218.html

ISU EXTENSION GARDEN CALENDAR NOW AVAILABLE

Celebrating 25 years of garden calendars is the theme of the 2003 Iowa State University Extension garden calendar (PM 815). The calendar features monthly garden tips and includes a list of ISU Extension horticulture publications. For the first time the calendar also will be offered in Spanish. Calendars are available at extension county offices for $6, and from the ISU Extension Distribution Center's Web site: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/pubs/Order.html

COLLEGE HELPS SPONSOR FFA SOIL JUDGING COMPETITION

The Davis County FFA Chapter Soils Judging Team placed first at the 2002 Iowa FFA Soil Career Development Event, which was co-sponsored by Iowa State. The competition drew 29 teams on Oct. 19. The top five teams qualified to represent Iowa in the 52nd annual International Land Judging Career Development Event next May in Oklahoma City. Besides the Davis County team, those qualifying were Denison FFA, Orient-Macksburg FFA, Emmetsburg FFA and Montezuma FFA. Associate Dean for Extension Gerald Miller helped coordinate the event. Jon Sandor, agronomy, and Rich Pope, entomology, served as judges. Angie Rieck-Hinz, agronomy, helped with site coordination and contest preparations, and Virgil Schmitt, extension crops field specialist, and Brian Tiffany, agronomy, helped with scoring.

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS

Oct. 28: Think Tank on Animal Agriculture, 6 p.m., Cardinal Room, Memorial Union, RSVP by Oct. 25 to Julie Roberts, jrober@iastate.edu

Oct. 30: Art tour with Dean Woteki, noon, meet in Agronomy Hall courtyard

Nov. 1: North Central Soybean Research Programs soybean research pre-proposals due More info: http://www.ncsrp.com/links.html

Nov. 1: National Science Foundation’s Frontiers in Integrative Biological Research program preliminary proposals due Guidelines are at: http://www.nsf.gov/pubsys/ods/getpub.cfm?nsf02154

Nov. 1: Insect Horror Film Festival, 6 p.m., Sun Room, Memorial Union

Nov. 18: Deadline for college and university award submissions, http://www.ag.iastate.edu/agcoll/awards.html

Nov. 20: Competitive grants funding session, by Mark Bailey, national program leader of USDA’s CSREES economic and community systems unit, 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in room 179 Scheman, RSVP Elena Polush, 4-8493 or elenap@iastate.edu by Nov. 11

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COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

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SCHEDULING HELPS TACKLE LARGE PROJECTS

After taking on a big project, consider the following three steps to keep your work on track:

- List the project's major stages. Aim for a focused, well-defined list.

- Break each stage into action items.

- Enter action items on a calendar or daily planner. That works better than making a huge to-do list.

(Communication Briefings, October)

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INFOGRAZING

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CONSENT FORM AVAILABLE FOR PROJECTS WITH HUMAN SUBJECTS

The Institutional Review Board has developed an informed consent document template to help ISU researchers prepare forms for work that includes human subjects. Using the template ensures that the eight basic elements required by the federal regulations are met. For more information: http://grants-svr.admin.iastate.edu/vpr/humansubjects.html

SCHOLARS PROGRAM SEEKS MULTICULTURAL PROPOSALS

The USDA-CSREES is seeking proposals for the Higher Education Multicultural Scholars Program, which is designed to increase the diversity of the food and agricultural scientific and professional workforce. Deadline for proposals is Jan. 24. More information: http://www.reeusda.gov/1700/funding/rfamulti.htm

FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH FOODS, DRINKS FLOOD THE MARKET

For the 78 million Americans between the ages of 38 and 56, the struggle to cling to youth has become a highly public, generational obsession. Boomers are pouring $30 billion annually into anti-aging products, revitalizing businesses ranging from food and cosmetics to pharmaceuticals and biotechnology. The trend can be seen in the increasing popularity of the $28 billion nutraceutical market, with products like soy milk, antioxidant-enriched cereals and health drinks like Dannon's Actimel, which contains bacteria cultures to help boost the body's immune system. A recent Food Marketing Institute survey shows nearly 9 in 10 shoppers aged 40 to 49 had purchased nutraceuticals. Among current favorites: ginkgo biloba and elderberries for mental clarity; glucosamine for more limber joints; and ZMA, a zinc-magnesium aspartate compound that's billed as an anabolic mineral formula to enhance muscle strength. And while pills and powders may have been okay for their parents, Boomers want their drugs packaged in New Age beverages, cookies, candy bars and chewing gum. (American Demographics, October)

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EXTERNAL VOICES

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BOOKSTORES CAN BE SCARY PLACES

"Though books, as Milton says, may be the embalming of mighty spirits, they are also the resurrection of rebellious, reactionary, fantastical and wicked spirits! In books dwell all the demons and all the angels of the human mind. It is for this reason that a bookshop -- especially a second-hand bookshop -- is an arsenal of explosives, an armory of revolutions, an opium den of reaction.”

- English novelist and critic John Cowper Powys, 1872-1963

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MARGINALIA

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ALMOST AS GOOD AS BEING THERE IN THE COMBINE

Time is running out to visit Minnesota farmers Art and Paul Wendt by way of “CabCam.” The feature on Successful Farming’s website puts you next to the driver seat in the Wendts’ combine as it harvests. You also can read from their field journal or take a tour of their farm: http://email.agriculture.com/cgi-bin1/flo?y=eYdz044bA0TM0FPyU0Ag

Next issue: Nov. 4 Deadline: Nov. 8

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AG ONLINE

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EDITORS

Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu, and Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu

Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

SUBSCRIBE

Ag Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University's College of Agriculture, is e-mailed every Monday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag Online subscribe" to edadcock@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag Online unsubscribe."

Iowa State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, sex, marital status, disability or status as a U.S. Vietnam Era Veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact the Director of Affirmative Action, 1031 Wallace Road Office Building, Room 101, (515) 294-7612.

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