Issue: 22

COLLEGE NEWS

- Associate Deans Seminars Scheduled

- Faculty/Staff Retreat

- Curtiss Hall Directory

- DNA to Dessert

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- When a Reporter Calls

INFOGRAZING

- Rural Technology Use

- Farm Restructuring Reports

EXTERNAL VOICES

- $7.5 Billion: Not Enough

MARGINALIA

- Fortune cookies, Midwest-style

C O L L E G E N E W S

ASSOCIATE DEANS SEMINARS SCHEDULED

The candidates (and seminar times/days) for Associate Dean, State

Programs are:

- Bruce Menzel, chairman, Department of Animal Ecology; 4 p.m.,

Friday, July 7

- Robert Martin, professor, Department of Agricultural Education

and

Studies; 3:30 p.m., Monday, July 10

- R. Kirby Barrick, chair of the Department of Agricultural Education,

Ohio

State University; 2:30 p.m., Monday July 17

- Eric Hoiberg, professor, Department of Sociology; 2 p.m., Wednesday,

July 19

The candidates (and seminar times/days) for Associate Dean, National

Programs are:

- Jerry Klonglan, interim associate dean and associate director,

Ag

Experiment Station; 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 18

- Rodney Dietert, director of the Institute for Comparative and

Environmental Toxicology, Cornell University; 1:30 p.m., Thursday,

July 20

Each will discuss the topic "Administrative Philosophies

in Agricultural

Administration." College of Agriculture faculty, staff and

students are

encouraged to attend the seminars in Room 1951 of the Food Sciences

Building (CCUR Theater).

The Associate Dean for State Programs will coordinate distance

learning

programs, off-campus degree programs and instruction within the

College and

will be a liaison with state agricultural agencies and Iowa citizen

and

commodity groups. The Associate Dean for National Programs will

coordinate

research within the College and act as a liaison with national

and

international agricultural agencies and academic societies.

The search for the Associate Dean, Industry Programs is on hold

during

further discussions regarding the responsibilities associated

with this

position.

FACULTY/STAFF RETREAT

Set aside Aug. 17, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., for the College's

faculty/staff retreat. It will be at the Holiday Inn-Gateway.

Watch your

mail and future editions of Ag Online for more information.

CURTISS HALL DIRECTORY

The Curtiss Hall office shift is done. Phone numbers have not

changed. Any

office not listed here remained in its original spot. Office-warming

gifts

may be sent to these locations:

Agricultural Experiment Station

Room 123N

Colin Scanes, executive associate dean and associate director

Gerald Klonglan, interim associate dean

Cathy Good, secretary

Marie Miller, secretary

Room 124

Susan Lamont, assistant director

Shirley Riney, research program coordinator

Carla Persaud, secretary

ASSIST Program - 3397 Food Sciences Building

Charles Ertzinger, director

Lee Tesdell, graduate student

Budget and Finance Office - Room 117

Del Koch, director

Laurie Vold, administrative specialist

Josie Niemand, accountant

Barb Martin, account specialist

International Agriculture Programs

Room 104

David Acker, director

Mary de Baca, associate director

Dolores DoBell, student and visitor services

Sue Finestead, secretary

Sherri Nystrom, secretary

Dorothy Rust, secretary

Room 223 (temporary space)

Harold Crawford, professor, ag education & studies

David Hansen, professor, economics

Mercedes Serracin, program assistant

Eduarda Becerra, secretary

Joe Dale, graduate student

Victor Udin, graduate student

Room 18

Galina Krasikova, program assistant

Elena Polouchkina, graduate student

Student Services Office - Room 23

Tom Polito, classification officer

Jane Lohnes, associate classification officer

Charanne Parks, minority program coordinator

Marilyn Boswell, clerk

Jan Ostermann, secretary

Norma Hensley, program assistant

Mickie Bergeson, secretary

DNA TO DESSERT

Ten junior high students participated in a hands-on, hi-tech agriculture

EXPLORATIONS! seminar June 25-July 1. The program, titled "DNA

to Dessert,"

examined aspects of food production. Daily seminars developed

by College of

Agriculture professors gave the students a chance to purify and

examine DNA

from plants and bacteria, isolate fats from food and make low

fat frozen

desserts. The seminar was sponsored by the Office of Precollegiate

Programs

for Talented and Gifted (OPPTAG).

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

WHEN A REPORTER CALLS

Say: "I'm in the middle of something (which is always true).

Let me call

you back." (Be sure to ask about the reporter's deadline

before hanging

up.) The delay will give you time to collect your thoughts, focus

yourself

and consult any material you might need. Another way to help focus

is get

up from your desk, where you generally feel comfortable and secure.

Stand

up or move to a phone where you can talk without being distracted.

The tip

is from media training by Words & Pictures, a communications

firm that

consults with ISU.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

RURAL TECHNOLOGY USE

Rural residents ride the information superhighway more often than

Americans

as a whole, according to a recent study. The Rural Policy Research

Institute, a consortium of which ISU is a member, found that 46

percent of

rural residents use personal computers, faxes, e-mail and similar

technology. About 33 percent of the nation in general uses such

technology.

Top users were medical services, education and business. RUPRI

surveyed 20

small towns in Iowa, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Kansas

and

Minnesota. (Wall Street Journal, June 29)

FARM RESTRUCTURING REPORTS

"Beyond the Amber Waves of Grain: An Examination of Economic

and

Social Restructuring in the Heartland" explores the impacts

of the economic

upheaval in the Midwest resulting from the 1980s farm crisis.

The book

draws upon surveys from 12 states to examine farm restructuring

and its

social, economic and political consequences. It is available for

$37 from

Westview Press, 5500 Central Ave., Boulder, CO 80301-2877; (303)

444-3541.

Survey results for individual states were published in "Farm

Family

Adaptations to Severe Economic Stress," available for $3

from the North

Central Regional Center for Rural Development. Contact: Julie

Stewart,

294-8321 or jstewart@iastate.edu.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

$7.5 BILLION: NOT ENOUGH

"Secretary Wallace thinks the farm income this year will

be about seven and

a half billion dollars, which is about twice what it was in 1932

but which

will hardly pay me for my time even so. Since coming to live on

the land I

am concerned with all such reports. From a limited experience

with farm

operation, I should call seven and a half billion dollars scarcely

enough

to pay off the farmers in a dozen States. I should estimate that

the farm

income, with or without crop control, would have to be about a

hundred

times greater than it is to make it worth any man's while to work

the

land." E.B. White, in the essay "Security," September

1938.

M A R G I N A L I A

FORTUNE COOKIES, MIDWEST-STYLE

>From Howard Mohr's "How To Talk Minnesotan: A Visitor's

Guide": "What kept

Minnesotans away from Chinese restaurants more than anything else

was the

fortune cookies -- the fortunes left customers with a bad taste

in their

mouth. So the restaurants . . . now serve Minnesota-style fortune

cookies."

Examples include:

YOU WILL CHANGE THE OIL IN YOUR CAR EVERY 2000 MILES.

THERE COULD BE THUNDERSTORMS TOMORROW.

YOU WILL RUN OUT OF 2 PERCENT MILK.

PEOPLE AROUND YOU THINK YOU ARE OKAY, MOSTLY.

THE BIG SHADE ELM IN YOUR FRONT YARD HAS HAD IT.

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