Issue: 21

COLLEGE NEWS

- The Curtiss Hall shuffle

- Finding the college fiscal office

- Two administrators begin

- Two administrators end

- Sign up for State Fair

- Forestry DEO

- Information avalanche

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Watch that 'reply' button

INFOGRAZING

- Environmental caretakers

- Syllabus: Free to educators

EXTERNAL VOICES

- A little knowledge

- A little common sense

MARGINALIA

- Do as I say . . .

C O L L E G E N E W S

THE CURTISS HALL SHUFFLE

The moving of college administrative offices in Curtiss Hall continues,

and should be finished by July 7. Office signs in the hallways

are being switched as moves are made. Phone numbers remain the

same. The next Ag Online will include a directory of new offices.

For now, here's a current list of people who have moved:

- Cathy Good, Office of Executive Associate Dean, College of Agriculture

and Experiment Station, Room 123N

- Norma Hensley, Student Services Office, Room 23

- Mickie Bergeson, Student Services Office, Room 23

- Susan Lamont, Experiment Station, Room 124

- Shirley Riney, Experiment Station, Room 124

- Carla Persaud, Experiment Station, Room 124

- Charanne Parks, Minority Programs, Room 23

- David Hansen, International Programs, Room 223

- Charles Ertzinger, ASSIST Program, 3397 Food Sciences Building

FINDING THE COLLEGE FISCAL OFFICE

As part of the Curtiss Hall office shuffle, the fiscal office

of the college and Experiment Station will move from Room 104

to Room 117 on Wednesday, June 28, and Thursday, June 29. If you

have forms needing immediate attention during these days, please

take them to Cathy Good in Room 123N. Del Koch will check in periodically

to sign the forms. Thanks for your patience and cooperation.

TWO ADMINISTRATORS BEGIN

David Acker, the new director of Agricultural International Programs,

will be on the job July 5. Colin Scanes, the new executive associate

dean, begins on July 17. Their phone numbers: Acker, 294-8454;

Scanes, 294-1823.

TWO ADMINISTRATORS END

The week of June 26 is Associate Dean for Academic Programs Detroy

Green's last on the job. He is retiring after 31 years as a faculty

member and administrator, but plans to help the agronomy department

develop new teaching materials. On July 1, Associate Dean for

International Programs Harold Crawford will join the agricultural

education and studies faculty, where he will teach and continue

international interests within the department.

SIGN UP FOR STATE FAIR

The Iowa State Fair, Aug. 10-20, is fast approaching. That means

it's time for volunteers to sign up to staff the college's exhibit

in the Agriculture Building. The theme of this year's display

is "Gardens Excite the Senses," about gardening's appeal

to the five senses and a preview of the new Reiman Gardens. No

special knowledge of horticulture is needed to be a volunteer.

Volunteers work a four-hour shift, starting at 9 a.m. There are

three shifts each day. Volunteers get a FREE admission ticket

and parking pass. Interested? Contact Ed Adcock, 294-2314, or

edadcock@iastate.edu, or look for sign-up sheets to be posted

or circulated soon in departmental or center offices.

FORESTRY DEO

In the last Ag Online, we said James M. Kelly was the new chair

of the Department of Forestry. Make that Mike Kelly. The forestry

department tells us that Dr. Kelly is generally known by his middle

name. Mike Kelly, currently with the Tennessee Valley Authority,

will begin his duties in October.

INFORMATION AVALANCHE

At a Visioning the Future forum, where faculty, staff and students

from universities and representatives from agribusinesses identified

trends, implications and strategies for graduate studies in agricultural

education, one topic was the "information avalanche."

Implications: Data/information management is becoming an essential

skill, and students and faculty will need to identify relevant

from non-relevant information. Suggested strategies: Classes on

how to search the Internet, and sharing information-management

skills between faculty and students. The March forum was sponsored

by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Department of Agricultural

Education and Studies.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

WATCH THAT 'REPLY' BUTTON

Managers of e-mail list services, or listservs, are aware that

many subscribers don't fully understand, or practice, proper list

service procedures. Here's a user tip from David Riggins of the

Gopher Jewels Project: Remember that everything you post to the

list goes to every subscriber on the list, and the list may have

thousands of members. There are times when you probably want to

reply only to the individual who posted a particular message.

Make sure you address your message to that individual's e-mail

address -- not to the whole group (which is what happens if you

use the "reply"function of most e-mail packages). Remember

that the reply option will send your message back to all members

of the list.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

ENVIRONMENTAL CARETAKERS

Farmers and agriculture fared well in the National Survey of Attitudes

Towards Natural Resource Conservation. As a category, individual

farmers had the highest rating as environmental caretakers, followed

closely by "agriculture." More than 90 percent of the

1,250 respondents were neither farmers nor ranchers. The survey

was completed in January by the Natural Resources Conservation

Service. Copies are available for $10 from the Conservation Technology

Information Center, 1220 Potter Drive, Room 170,West Lafayette,

IN 46906-1383.

SYLLABUS: FREE TO EDUCATORS

Syllabus, billed as "the definitive technology magazine for

colleges, universities and high schools," is available free

to educators. The California-based publication covers technology

in education, reporting on what different educators, researchers

and institutions are doing with computers, video, telecommunications

and multimedia. For 1995-96 there will be special issues on software

products for the curriculum; multimedia; the Internet, telecommunications

and education; and video and presentation technologies. For more

information, contact Brian Meyer, Ag Information, bmeyer@iastate.edu.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

A LITTLE KNOWLEDGE

"If a little knowledge is dangerous, where is the man who

has so much as to be out of danger?" Thomas Henry Huxley,

On Elemental Instruction in Physiology, 1877.

A LITTLE COMMON SENSE

"Everybody gets so much information all day long that they

lose their

common sense." Gertrude Stein, 1946.

M A R G I N A L I A

DO AS I SAY . . .

An item in Campus Connections, a paper at the University of Nevada

at Reno: "Richard Law, director of general education at Washington

State University, will discuss the challenges of teaching the

large lecture class at a Faculty Senate Brown Bag Forum . . .

The forums are limited to 15 people." (Chronicle of Higher

Education, May 19)

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