Issue: 207

...................................................

C O L L E G E N E W S

...................................................

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION A FOCUS OF WASHINGTON TRIP A group of college administrators and department chairs will be in Washington, D.C. this week to meet with officials of federal agencies and legislative leaders. Gerald Miller, associate dean, extension programs and outreach; Mike Kelly, chair of natural resource ecology and management; Steven Fales, head of agronomy; Ramesh Kanwar, head of agricultural and biosystems engineering; Susan Lamont, head of animal science; and David Acker, assistant dean, national and global programs, are leaving today. They are scheduled to meet with about 20 agency representatives to learn about funding opportunities from federal sources and national science and technology policy in the area of environmental research and education.

LEOPOLD CENTER SUSPENDS KEY PROGRAMS, RESEARCH The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture has suspended its annual request for new research project ideas and will not be supporting educational events or conferences this year. The program changes are the result of a $1 million transfer of funds earmarked for Leopold Center work from the Groundwater Protection Fund. Iowa legislators approved the transfer, representing an 86 percent reduction in what the Leopold Center would have received from that fund, during a May 28, 2002 special session to help balance the state's 2003 budget. The center has a financial reserve to complete research projects underway at the time of the budget cuts. Since 1988, the Leopold Center has funded more than 250 competitive grants totaling more than $10 million. A news release with more information will be posted Tuesday on the center's Website at:

110 STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN 2002 AG STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS The ISU College of Agriculture has 110 students participating in travel courses this summer. Trips in May went to Scotland, Brazil, Ireland and Mexico. Trips in June were to France and Peru. Two more trips will take place in August, going to Australia and Germany. The study abroad office awarded $21,000 in scholarships to 65 students this year. Awards ranged from $200 to $500, and everyone who applied for a scholarship received one. Last summer, 92 students participated in the study-abroad summer travel courses.

ISU RECEIVES $21 MILLION GRANT TO HELP YOUTH AVOID PROBLEMS Iowa State has received a $21 million federal grant to develop community partnerships that strengthen families and help young people avoid substance abuse and behavioral problems. The National Institute on Drug Abuse awarded $21,111,085 to the Institute for Social and Behavioral Research at Iowa State. The five-year project will involve youth in 14 Iowa communities. Pennsylvania State University will collaborate with ISU to implement a similar program in 14 Pennsylvania communities. The project will reach about 10,000 youth in the two states. More details:

USDA HONORS FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE The Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI), a center jointly administered by Iowa State University and the University of Missouri-Columbia, received a Secretary's Honor Award from U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Ann Veneman at a ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Monday, July 8. Learn more:

ISU BOTANY PROFESSOR DEVELOPING IOWA GRASSES GUIDE Most Iowans this summer are focusing their attention on two grasses -- bluegrass and crabgrass. But Lynn Clark is taking a much broader view. Clark, a botany professor, was awarded a three-year, $112,000 grant by the Fred Maytag Family Foundation to develop an interactive Web resource devoted to Iowa grasses. When complete, the Website will allow people to see and learn about the nearly 200 grasses that grow in Iowa. Learn more:

RESEARCH HOLDS PROMISE FOR ALTERNATIVE TO HRT A National Institutes of Health research study about to get underway at Iowa State University could offer a partial alternative to hormone replacement therapy for women who want to prevent bone loss after menopause. D. Lee Alekel, associate professor of nutrition and principal investigator on this multi-center trial, and project coordinator Oksana Matvienko, a post-doctoral fellow, will expand upon a preliminary, short-term study that showed isoflavone-rich soy protein reduced bone loss in the lumbar spine. Isoflavones are estrogen-like compounds found in soybeans. Details:

INTERNATIONAL INTERNS, COMING AND GOING

Seventeen ISU students are participating in the college's summer international internship program, while another 17 interns from seven countries are interning on campus. The ISU students are interning in Costa Rica, France, Spain, Germany, Greece, Ghana and Mexico. The international students have come from Mexico, Germany, Argentina, Spain, Greece, Poland, Macedonia, France, Ukraine and Costa Rica. They are working with faculty in molecular biology, agronomy, animal science, ag economics, food science, animal ecology, horticulture, entomology and plant pathology.

INTERNATIONAL AG CLUB HELPS WITH TEXTBOOK DRIVE The International Agriculture Club helped collect nearly 100 used textbooks that were donated to students at Egerton University in Njoro, Kenya. The club partnered with the College of Education's "Experience Kenya" summer study experience. Experience Kenya is a five-week program that provides ISU students with the chance to study alongside Kenyan students in courses taught in English by Kenyan scholars. The textbooks were hand-carried by participating students and presented to Egerton University administrators at a reception in May. This is the second year the International Agriculture Club has helped to get textbooks into the hands of Kenyan college students.

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS

July 16: Field day, Muscatine Island Research and Demonstration Farm, Fruitland

Aug. 15: Field day, Allee Research and Demonstration Farm, Newell

.......................................................................

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

.......................................................................

PUBLICATION COVERS COMMUNICATING RESEARCH WITH DONORS Advocating for scientific research is the goal of a publication prepared by the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC). "How to State the Value of Your Research" was written by David MacKenzie of NASULGC's Experiment Station Committee on Organization and Policy. In the report he states that success in communicating with funding providers requires assuring them: You have helped them complete their agenda. Their money has been well-spent.

They are getting credit for their investment. The research topic they are investing in remains important to them. Real progress is being made for them.

He included rules and a checklist for meeting those criteria. The report can be downloaded at:

...................................................

I N F O G R A Z I N G

...................................................

WORLD FOOD PRIZE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM TO LOOK AT WATER ISSUES The World Food Prize International Symposium, Oct. 24-25 in Des Moines, will focus on critical issues involving water management around the world. The symposium, "From the Middle East to the Middle West: Managing Freshwater Shortages and Regional Water Security," will bring in experts from around the world, including speakers from Syria, Israel, Palestine and Egypt. Topics will include inter-boundary water issues in the Middle East; water as a crucial part of economic development in water-deficient areas like Afghanistan; the potential terrorist threat against water in America; and water issues in agriculture and food production across the United States. The ceremony to honor the World Food Prize 2002 Laureate will be held the evening of Oct. 24. For more information: or email wfp@worldfoodprize.org.

"WHITE PAPERS" ADDRESS CSREES STRATEGIC PLANNING ISSUES USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service has prepared six issue papers on long-range planning topics important to CSREES, USDA and the land-grant university community. The documents cover global opportunities, consumer-drive agriculture, developing scientific and professional expertise, new extension opportunities, biosecurity and rural development. The "white papers" can be accessed on the Web:

...................................................

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

...................................................

CAN PROFESSORS BRING HEART AND SOUL TO DISTANCE EDUCATION? Some professors think distance education is good only for technical subjects, professional-development courses and other situations in which personal interaction isn't crucial for learning. "I would never waste my time trying to use it for anything on which the teacher's human and creative skills are at a premium," says John Janovy Jr., a biology professor who has taught for 35 years at the University of Nebraska. "I do not believe for one minute that such education comes anywhere close to the mentoring ideal that should be part of university teaching." Other professors, though, have embraced technology and online education. Bill Pelz, professor of psychology at Herkimer County Community College in New York, says the personal interaction and cultivation that he can provide in the classroom aren't much different from what happens in a good online course. "What makes a heart-and-soul professor is the passion they bring to the job. That passion extends online or in the classroom," Pelz says. (Chronicle for Higher Education, May 10)

Next issue: July 22Deadline: July 19

........................................................

AG ONLINE

........................................................

EDITORS

Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu, and Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu Phone: (515) 294-5616Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

SUBSCRIBE

Ag Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University's College of Agriculture, is e-mailed every Monday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag Online subscribe" to edadcock@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag Online unsubscribe."

Iowa State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, sex, marital status, disability or status as a U.S. Vietnam Era Veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact the Director of Affirmative Action, 1031 Wallace Road Office Building, Room 101, (515) 294-7612.

Share