Issue: 205

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C O L L E G E N E W S

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REGENTS APPROVE DEPARTMENT MERGER

The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, at its June meeting approved the request to merge the departments of animal ecology and forestry. The new name of the department will be the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management. The department chair is Mike Kelly. Over the next academic year, the department will work on faculty assignments and curriculum.

NEW FISCAL YEAR BRINGS CHANGES TO COLLEGE JOURNAL PAPER SYSTEM

Reductions in state funding have meant the elimination of support for publishing faculty journal papers (page charges, reprints and editing services) traditionally provided by the College of Agriculture and the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station. However, some journal-publishing support will be available during the fiscal year that begins today (July 1) by special request from departments. Special-request funds will be provided on a 50-50 cost-share basis with departments, with the Experiment Station's share not to exceed $500 per paper. Requests will be filled on a case-by-case basis. The special-request form is available as an Acrobat PDF at: . The free Acrobat Reader, which is needed to view, complete and submit the form, can be downloaded from:

OTHER CHANGES IN JOURNAL PAPER SYSTEM

As of today, July 1, faculty will no longer need to request journal-paper numbers. However, faculty will be asked to contribute information to a new Web-based system that will be developed for the fall semester. The new system will improve the tracking of scientific publishing in the college. On a quarterly basis, faculty will submit information on published, external peer-reviewed research, extension and teaching papers. Information entered in the system will become part of each department's benchmark performance data, which will be used to determine budget allocations. A public website also will be created that can be searched for information on published work in the College of Agriculture. Also ending today is support for editing services for scientific manuscripts. Agriculture Communications can provide a list of local freelance editors. (See more in Communications Kiosk.)

SEE SNEAK PREVIEW OF POV'S ‘HYBRID’

A sneak preview screening of a film titled Hybrid, produced by Monteith McCullen, will be presented from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in room 8 or 13 Curtiss Hall (depending on the number of those attending). Feel free to bring lunch. The nonfiction documentary will begin airing on PBS’ Point of View (POV) program July 9. The film is a portrait of a corn-obsessed visionary named Milford Beeghly of Pierson, Iowa. The producers use dancing ears of corn, snippets of old commercials and visuals of the rich Midwest farmland to illustrate Beeghly's faith in the miracles of hybridization. Seating is limited, so if you plan to attend contact Barb McManus at 294-0707 or Ann Bugler at 294-9732, co-chairs of the Iowa Ag Communicators in Education (ACE). The POV producers are looking for responses to the film. You can videotape your response or send the producers a written response on the web at: .

NEW VALUE-ADDED AGRICULTURE CENTER OPEN FOR BUSINESS

The establishment of a center that focuses on value-added agriculture was announced at a news conference at Iowa State University in January. Since then, dozens of research and extension personnel at ISU, Kansas State University, the University of California and Oklahoma State University have been on a fast-track. A $5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture made the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center possible. Its mission is to provide independent producers and processors with information they can use to build successful value-added agricultural enterprises. Learn more in “Agriculture in Action” at:

IOWA CIDER PRODUCERS MAKE THE GRADE

Apple cider producers in Iowa have taken precautions to make their processing methods safe and sanitary. That's the finding of a survey conducted during the past two growing seasons by Iowa State food scientists Alecia Cummins, Cheryll Reitmeier, Lester Wilson and Bonita Glatz. At five orchards, samples of apples from various points in the cider production process were collected and tested for the presence of microorganisms. The researchers found pasteurization significantly reduced the presence of microorganisms, including yeast and molds, aerobic bacteria and coliforms. No E. coli bacteria were found in the sampled cider. In addition to the orchard visits, questionnaires were sent to Iowa-certified apple cider producers. More details at:

FIRST BORLAUG INTERN NAMED

The ISU Plant Sciences Institute and the World Food Prize have awarded the first Borlaug Internship to David Schladt. The internship provides an experience in international food production systems or human nutrition. It is named for Nobel laureate Dr. Norman Borlaug, who is an Iowa native. Schladt, Plattsmouth, Neb., graduated in May with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural biochemistry. He will leave tomorrow for an eight-week internship at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in Mexico. The Borlaug Internship will be offered annually for a qualified ISU junior, senior or recent graduate. The Plant Sciences Institute and World Food Prize will work with Iowa State's College of Agriculture's Global Agriculture program office to select applicants. Learn more:

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS

July 1: Nomination deadline for Agricultural Safety and Health Hall of Fame Award, more info:

July 9: Lauren Christian Pork Chop Open, 10 a.m., Veenker Memorial Golf Course, more info:

July 9: Field day, Rhodes Research and Demonstration Farm, Rhodes, more info:

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C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

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JOURNAL PAPER EDITING PAYS OFF

Hiring an outside editor to review your paper is a good investment. Many journals are indicating that they don't have the staff to rewrite papers or do numerous corrections. Example: The Environmental Toxicology And Chemistry Journal instructions state: "Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry does not have a technical editorial staff to rewrite manuscripts; therefore, contributions must conform to the accepted standards of English style and usage upon submission." The instructions also include this statement: "Authors not following ET&C style and format will experience a delay in publication." Both statements indicate the advantage of seeking the advice of a professional editor. The Ag Communications office has a list of freelance editors available to edit papers for a fee. For more information contact Barb McManus at 294-0707 or bamcman@iastate.edu.

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I N F O G R A Z I N G

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NEW AIR QUALITY PUBLICATION FROM MWPS

A new MidWest Plan Service publication, “Outdoor Air Quality,” uses a science-based approach to measuring air quality and emphasizes the basic principles involved in controlling dust and odor. Jeff Lorimor of Iowa State is one of five researchers who wrote this 95-page book. To order: call 83618; e-mail mwps@iastate.edu; or visit the MWPS Web site at .

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E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

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AN IMMIGRANT’S VIEW OF AMERICA

"People throughout the developing world want to be Americans for the economic benefits they will gain. But the greatest advantage of being American is the separation from old ideas and attitudes. Being an American means taking on a spirit of cooperation aimed at securing mutual benefits. Americans possess little that is as valuable as that political attitude. … The American attitude of acceptance and cooperation needs to flourish in all parts of the world, and if world peace is to continue, the nations of the world must learn to cooperate for mutual benefit." Edward Teller in "Memoirs: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics" (2001)

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M A R G I N A L I A

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FAREWELL TO PLASTIC?

New technology developed originally by the Australian government could help rid the world's trash heaps of wasteful plastic packaging. Plantic Technologies is rolling out a cornstarch-based bioplastic that can be molded into everything from candy bar wrappers to those sturdy little cracker trays. Several bioplastic development projects are underway in Germany and the United States, but the Australian venture has the added virtue of biodegrading at temperatures as low as 33 degrees Fahrenheit -- simply by being exposed to moisture and the microorganisms in soil. "Dry goods packaging for chocolates and biscuits is just the first step," says Plantics CEO David MacInnes. "The main drive is to improve strength and reduce costs." Several international food companies, including Cadbury Schweppes, are testing Plantics bioplastic products, and the company has also developed a biodegradable plastic that could be used by farmers as ground sheeting for growing tomatoes and other crops. Conventional sheeting -- some 650,000 tons per year -- must be dug up after the harvest and carted off to the landfill. (Wired Jul 2002)

Next issue: July 8 Deadline: July 5

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AG ONLINE

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EDITORS

Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu, and Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu

Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

SUBSCRIBE

Ag Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University's College of Agriculture, is e-mailed every Monday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag Online subscribe" to edadcock@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag Online unsubscribe."

Iowa State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, sex, marital status, disability or status as a U.S. Vietnam Era Veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact the Director of Affirmative Action, 1031 Wallace Road Office Building, Room 101, (515) 294-7612.

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