Issue: 197

...................................................C O L L E G E N E W S

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HELP CELEBRATE GRADUATES ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Faculty and staff are invited to help recognize spring and summer graduates at Saturday’s convocation. Outstanding senior Barry Bradford, agricultural biochemistry and animal science, will speak. Three other students will be recognized for their achievements, they are: Scott Metzger, dairy science, academic award; Kate Nelson, horticulture, distinguished service; and Amanda Taylor, ag business, leadership. The convocation program will begin at 9 a.m. in C.Y. Stephens. The doors open at 8 a.m. and coffee, milk and rolls will be served.

STUDENT'S SUCCESSES FOLLOW FAMILY TRADITION AT ISU

Graduating senior Barry Bradford, who will speak at the college convocation, comes from a family of Iowa State graduates. Six of his seven older sisters attended ISU, as did his father, Jim Bradford. Barry’s parents are Jim and Mary Bradford, Guthrie Center. Barry recently received a National Science Foundation fellowship award that will provide three years of funding for his master’s and doctorate degrees. He will begin his training in ruminant nutrition at Michigan State University this summer. Before leaving for Michigan, Barry will marry Sarah Steuk, who will receive her bachelor’s degree in agricultural education and studies on Saturday.

UNIVERSITY RECOGNIZES INVENTORS WITH PRODUCT SALES

Iowa State inventors were honored for their discoveries at an April 29 dinner hosted by the university and the ISU Research Foundation. Several of those recognized were from the College of Agriculture. They included: Charles Hall, former horticulture department head, for Sentinel watermelon seeds; Max Rothschild, Niels Larsen (formerly at ISU) and Kwan-Suk Kim, animal science, for the MC4R genetic marker in pigs; Paul Domoto, horticulture, for the Carpathian walnut tree; and Tom Baker, John Obrycki and Junwei Zhu, entomology, for Benallure insect attractant. Many of the honorees had products on the market between 1998 and 2001.

COLLEGE HELPS SPONSOR NATIONAL URBAN AG SYMPOSIUM

The College of Agriculture is one of the sponsors of a national symposium on urban agriculture to be held May 20-22 in Dallas. "Urban Agriculture: Emerging Opportunities in Science, Education and Policy" will focus on common interests of agricultural and urban communities, including water quality, composting waste, soil and storm water management, food production and marketing, community building, education and training, and the green industry. Lorna Michael Butler, the Henry A. Wallace Endowed Chair for Sustainable Agriculture, is a member of the meeting's organizing committee. Butler and Dale Maronek of Oklahoma State University are the lead authors of a new Council for Agricultural Science and Technology report on urban agriculture, which will be released at the symposium. For more information: http://urbanag.tamu.edu

MEETING MAY 7 ON NEW GRAIN HARVESTING TECHNOLOGY

Faculty and staff are invited to an informational meeting Tuesday, May 7, to learn more about a new grain harvesting system under development by McLeod Harvest Inc. of Winnipeg, Canada. Bob McLeod, president and founder of the company, will talk about the harvesting technology, which the company calls a "sustainable agriculture system," from 9 to 11 a.m. in the Regency Room, Memorial Union. Staff of the Leopold Center and members of Practical Farmers of Iowa have been invited to the meeting, but it is open to anyone interested. For more information: http://www.mcleodharvest.com/

ISU DAIRY STUDENTS PUT LEARNING TO THE TEST

Four Iowa State University students majoring in dairy science recently matched wits with students from 12 other universities and came home with a second place finish. The first-ever North American Dairy Challenge Contest was hosted by Michigan State University April 12-13. The contest tested the ability of students to act as real-life dairy management consultants. Learn more in “Agriculture in Action” at: http://ww1.ag.iastate.edu/cgi-bin2/aginfo/agaction/agaction.pl?date=2002...

HONORS STUDENTS GIVE POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Nineteen seniors in the agriculture college participated in the Spring 2002 Honors Projects Poster Presentation April 29 in the Great Hall of the Memorial Union. They joined honors students from across the university to present posters on their individual projects. In addition, the recipients of this year’s awards of excellence were recognized. Sande McNabb, plant pathology, received the “Excellence in Teaching” award from the honors program at a faculty reception Feb. 27. Don Beitz, animal science, chairs the University Honors Committee.

IOWA STATE STUDENTS ARE WINNERS AT NATIONAL SOIL CONTEST

An agronomy senior took top individual honors and her team placed second in the American Society of Agronomy national soil judging contest April 20-26. Meghan Buckley, Greenwich, N.Y., won the individual portion of the contest, besting 82 other students. Twenty-one university teams participated in the contest that was hosted by the University of Minnesota. Besides Buckley, the six-member team from Iowa State included Erik Christian, Story City; Terri Howard, Orient; Jay Jung, Charles City; Brett Peelen, Sheldon; and Mark Scuffham, Algona. The team was coached by Jon Sandor, agronomy professor, and Skye Wills, agronomy graduate student.

PLANT SCIENTISTS TO DISCUSS EPIGENETICS

Six leading scientists in the area of epigenetic mechanisms in plants will present their research during the annual Plant Science Lecture Series at Iowa State University. Epigenetics is the study of the processes by which an organism's genetic information gives rise to discernible properties of an organism determined by interaction with the environment. The presentations will be May 16-17 in the Sun Room of the Memorial Union. The program is free and open to the public. Lunches are included. Registration is requested and can be made on the Web at http://www.agron.iastate.edu/plsclec/ or by contacting Mary Lents, agronomy, 4-3052 or mlents@iastate.edu. For more information: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2002/apr/epigenetics.shtml

IOWA STATE HOSTS NATIONAL ULTRASOUND CONFERENCE

Iowa State University is the host for the National Swine Improvement Federation National Ultrasound Training and Certification Conference May 20-21. The conference targets persons who want to learn more about estimating backfat thickness and loin muscle area using ultrasonic scanning procedures. The conference will be in Kildee Hall with a practicum at the Story County Fairgrounds in Nevada. ISU will provide 50 live pigs for the the scanning practicum. For more information: Tom Baas, animal science, 4-2240, or Barb Magnuson, Iowa Pork Industry Center, barbm@iastate.edu. A conference brochure is available at: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ipic/events/UScert.pdf

GRANT WRITERS WORKSHOP DEADLINE JUNE 28

The deadline is June 28 to sign up for the second College of Agriculture Research Grant Writers Workshop, which will be offered this fall with an orientation session Aug. 27. Faculty who participate will submit a project type grant application to a federal governmental and independent agency (e.g. USDA, NSF, EPA) foundation. Program costs are split between the college and departments. More information: Elena Polouchkina, 4-8493 or elenap@iastate.edu

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS

May 8: Modern Views in Nutrition seminar, 3:10 p.m., 1204 Kildee

May 11: College of Agriculture undergraduate convocation, 9 a.m., C.Y. Stephens

.......................................................................C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

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EVERYDAY CONFUSION

Barbara Wallraff had this response when asked about the confusion between “everyday” and “every day.” "I refuse to believe that most people can't tell an adverb or a noun from an adjective. After all, I tell them apart every day, and doing so is an everyday matter for you as well, is it not? Every day brings each of us new opportunities to distinguish the two forms. It's an everyday problem, and its difficulty will diminish if we practice solving it each and every day." Wallraff is the author of Word Court and senior editor at The Atlantic Monthly.

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I N F O G R A Z I N G

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CSREES TO BEGIN ACCEPTING GRANT PROPOSALS ELECTRONICALLY

CSREES announced recently that it intends to begin a phased implementation of an electronic grants application system with the 2004 fiscal year proposal cycle. CSREES will use a common federal electronic application and reporting system. Awards will be transmitted to recipients through the same system. CSREES anticipates that by FY 2005 all proposal and grant transactions between the agency and its partners will be handled electronically.

AG SAFETY HALL OF FAME AWARD ANNOUNCED

Iowa's Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (I-CASH) seeks nominations for its new Agricultural Safety and Health Hall of Fame Award. The award will recognize persons or organizations in Iowa who have made substantial, long-term contributions to the health and safety of the state's agricultural community. The nomination deadline is July 1. I-CASH is a joint venture of the University of Iowa, Iowa State University, the Iowa Department of Public Health and the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. Nomination forms and additional award information are available at: http://www.public-health.uiowa.edu/ICASH/Hall_of_Fame_Award.html

MARKET MECHANISMS AND INCENTIVES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT GRANTS SOUGHT

The Environmental Protection Agency is seeking applications for research about market mechanisms and economic incentives for environmental management programs. The application is Aug. 15. More information: http://es.epa.gov/ncer/rfa/02marketmech.html

SEMINAR FOR THOSE SEEKING NIH GRANTS

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) holds two seminars a year to help research faculty and administrators learn the fundamentals of preparing a strong application and navigating the review process. NIH staff knowledgeable in grants management, review, policy and scientific programs will be available throughout the two-day seminars. The final NIH regional seminar for 2002 will be hosted June 6-7 by the University of Louisville. More information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/seminars.htm

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AHRENS: 'I'M GLAD I CHOSE ISU!'

Lisa Ahrens will graduate this week. The senior in agronomy and agricultural business served on the Board of Regents, State of Iowa since 1997. The board recently announced her resignation. Besides her work as a regent, Ahrens' list of activities and accomplishments as an ISU student is a long one. Her future plans: She is getting married in June and in July will begin working for Dow AgroSciences in Grand Forks, N.D. (Her fiance works for ConAgra in North Dakota.) In an e-mail to the Agriculture Communications office, Ahrens wrote: "I have truly enjoyed my time at Iowa State and enjoyed being a part of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa. I am sad that I need to leave the Board of Regents, but I am also excited to begin a new chapter in my life and career. Thanks to my professors as well as friends and colleagues that I have worked with over the past five years. I'm glad I chose ISU!"

...................................................E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

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A LESSON IN AGRICULTURE FROM AWARD-WINNING CORNCAM

In April, Iowa Farmer Today, the weekly farm newspaper based in Cedar Rapids, received the Audrey Mackiewicz Award for its "CornCam," the first Web camera to show real-time development of a cornfield. The award, presented at the spring meeting of the North American Agricultural Journalists (NAAJ), recognizes news organizations that improve or increase coverage of agriculture. The CornCam was the brainchild of farmer Jim Greif and Iowa Farmer Today crops editor Dan Zinkand. Laura Rance, presiding officer at the NAAJ meeting, said the CornCam project was an innovative link between technology and people's natural curiosity. "Because it was so quirky, yet so simple, it attracted mainstream media attention to the fact that although people know little about how their food is produced, they still find it fascinating. It serves as a reminder to all of us in agricultural journalism that some of the simple things we take for granted are still 'news' as far as the general public is concerned." The CornCam can be found at http://www.IowaFarmer.com/corncam/corn.html

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M A R G I N A L I A

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SOYFOODS MAY RELIEVE PAIN

Experiments studying the pain relief effects of soyfoods on lab animals have been promising enough to warrant tests on people. Srinivasa Raja and Jill Tall of Johns Hopkins found that rats given a diet high in defatted soy flour had less swelling when injured and exhibited less response to pain compared with rats on different diets. The anti-inflammatory benefit seems to come from the protein in the soy, although other components of the food have been shown to help with other kinds of pain. (New York Times, March 26)