Issue: 196

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C O L L E G E N E W S

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FOOD SCIENCES BUILDING ALSO HEROIC

Last week’s Ag Online omitted the Food Sciences Building from Facilities Planning and Management’s list of "Energy Heroes," college buildings that are helping to make ISU's energy conservation program work. Food Sciences has saved more than $12,000 on its electric bills so far this fiscal year.

QUINN SPEECH RESCHEDULED

Kenneth Quinn, president of the World Food Prize Foundation, will deliver the final Modern Views in Nutrition seminar at 3:10 p.m., May 8, in 1204 Kildee. He was originally scheduled to speak today. More at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/quinn.html

CROP ADVISER INSTITUTE SUBJECT OF SEMINAR THURSDAY

Establishing an outreach institute to provide continuing education for agricultural professionals is the subject of a professional development session Thursday. Brent Brueland and Richard Carter will cover the creation of the Crop Adviser Institute from 12:10 to 1 p.m. in Room 8, Brenton Center. There is no charge, however those who attend are asked to register due to limited space. Contact Neena Bentley, 4-1862 or nbentley@iastate.edu.

HOIBERG, MYERS HONORED AT STUDENT AFFAIRS MEETING

Eric Hoiberg, associate dean for academic programs, received the Thomas B. Thielen Award at the April 24 spring meeting of the ISU Division of Student Affairs. The award recognized Hoiberg for his years of service to students and to the Division of Student Affairs. Also at the meeting, Deland Myers, food science and human nutrition, received a Faculty Certificate of Appreciation for his work in coordinating the Carver Academy for Minority Student Affairs.

FIRST FOUR-YEAR GRADUATES IN AG COMMUNICATIONS SET

Next week eight seniors will be the first students to graduate under the agricultural communications option in the Department of Agricultural Education and Studies. The department developed the ag communications option in 1998 in response to industry and alumni requests for specialized communicators with agricultural backgrounds. The option focuses on teaching students professional communication skills to be used in agricultural careers. Seven of the graduating students will go on to positions in industry and one plans to return to farming.

ISU NAMA CHAPTER RANKS IN TOP TEN

At the April 15-19 national meeting of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in Nashville, the ISU chapter of NAMA was named one of the top 10 chapters in the nation. The group also won the Innovative Idea Award for Outstanding Chapter Recruitment. Michaela Hogan, a junior in communications studies, won a $500 National Association of Farm Broadcasters scholarship. The NAMA adviser is Spiro Kiousis, Greenlee School of Journalism.

IS THE U.S. PREPARED FOR ANIMAL DISEASE OUTBREAKS?

That was a topic of discussion for journalists and experts at an interactive workshop about animal disease outbreaks and possible societal and economic impacts. The sessions were held April 22-23 at the College of Veterinary Medicine. Fourteen reporters attended, including those from National Public Radio, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and regional publications. Speakers with ties to the College of Agriculture included former dean Richard Ross; Stephen Sapp, sociology; Helen Jensen, economics; Paul Lasley, sociology; James McKean, Iowa Pork Industry Center; and Fred Kirschenmann, Leopold Center. The workshop was funded through a Council of the Advancement and Support of Education media fellowship, and organized by Jane Peterson, Greenlee School of Journalism. Reporters also toured the USDA animal disease laboratories and visited small and large animal-production facilities.

PUTTING MANURE BELOW THE SOIL REDUCES ODORS

Public discussion on gas and odor emissions from livestock production facilities continues to be a hot topic in Iowa. Research by Iowa State agricultural engineers provides data on how to control emissions during land application of manure. The project showed that injecting manure below the surface, or covering it completely with soil, reduced gas and odor emissions by 20 to 90 percent, depending on the method used. Learn more at: http://ww1.ag.iastate.edu/cgi-bin2/aginfo/agaction/agaction.pl?date=2002...

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF POULTRY MANURE STUDIED

Recent expansion of poultry production in Iowa has raised questions about the environmental impact of the industry. Three years of preliminary data from a research project by Iowa State agricultural engineers is providing some answers. The key finding is that, when compared to equivalent application rates of commercial fertilizer, poultry manure applied at reasonable rates can result in less impact on water quality and higher crop yields. Learn more at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/poultry.html

ISU FARM MAKES PIGS AVAILABLE FOR 4-H, FFA PROJECTS

For the second year, Iowa State has made pigs available for young people involved in 4-H and FFA projects in southwest Iowa. More than 200 feeder pigs recently were purchased by 39 4-H and FFA members from 10 counties at ISU's Lauren Christian Swine Research and Demonstration Farm near Atlantic. The pigs are part of a long-term sow study on the farm. Last year, young people from five counties bought 150 pigs. More details at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/swine.html

ISU STUDENTS' PIZZA CRUST TAKES NASA PRIZE

A pizza crust developed by Iowa State food science and human nutrition students won first prize in the NASA Food Technology Commercial Space Center product development competition. The sudents created "EZ Crust," which may someday allow astronauts to enjoy pizza in space. The product is made from okara, a high-fiber, high-protein by-product of soymilk and tofu production. More information: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2002/apr/pizza.shtml

VIDEO HELPS GROWERS OF SPECIALTY GRAINS

New seed technologies and special grain production opportunities are giving corn and soybeans producers the chance to produce consistent, high-quality grains and oilseeds. To help producers, ISU Extension, Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. and the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative teamed up to develop the "Planter Clean-out Procedures for Corn and Soybeans" video. The video shows the importance of cleaning out their equipment, how to do it and specific procedures for different kinds of planters. More information: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/newsrel/2002/apr02/apr0216.html

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS

April 29: Animal Think Tank meeting, 6 p.m., Cardinal Room, Memorial Union

May 1: Dean Isaacson reception, 2 to 4 p.m. with a program at 3 p.m., Campanile Room, Memorial Union

May 2: Marty Behrens retirement reception, 2 to 4 p.m. with a short program at 3 p.m., Agronomy Hall Courtyard or, in case of rain, the second floor commons of Agronomy Hall

May 5: Family Day celebrating spring at the Farm House Museum, 1 to 4 p.m., free, 4-7426

May 11: College of Agriculture undergraduate convocation, 9 a.m., C.Y. Stephens

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I N F O G R A Z I N G

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IN-STATE UNDERGRADUATES WILL PAY 12.6 PERCENT MORE

How much more will Iowa undergraduate students pay to attend ISU next fall? Here's information from the Board of Regents, State of Iowa that may prove useful. Undergraduate students who are Iowa residents will pay $1,022 more in 2002-03, a 12.6 percent increase over the current year. That total includes increases in tuition and fees and in residence hall room and board. Although final figures aren't available yet from ISU's peer institutions, ISU's costs will remain well below the mean for its peer group. (When all ISU student categories are included, the increase in tuition/fees averages 19.4 percent.)

2002-03 costs for in-state undergraduates:

--Tuition: $3,692

--Fees: $418

--Room/board (double-occupancy room, full board): $5,020

MICROBIAL OBSERVATORIES SOUGHT BY NSF

The National Science Foundation, Directorate for Biological Sciences announces the fourth competition for Microbial Observatories. The long-term goal is to develop a network of sites or "microbial observatories" to discover novel microorganisms, microbial consortia, communities, activities and other novel properties and to study their roles in diverse environments. Proposals are due July 23. More information: http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf02118

NSF LOOKING FOR MEDAL OF SCIENCE NOMINEES

The National Science Foundation seeks nominations for the 2003 National Medal of Science, the nation's highest honor for scientists and engineers presented annually by the president of the United States. The deadline for submitting nominations is June 30. Information about the nomination process can be found at: http://www.nsf.gov/nsb/awards/nms/

ARS OFFERS DAILY NEWS REPORTS

The USDA’s Agricultural Research Service provides daily and weekly news reports by e-mail. Its goal is to send subscribers something new, interesting and scientifically significant every day. Stories are issued each workday or you can get a weekly list of web links to each of the week's stories. Subscribe at: http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/subscribe.htm

THREE IOWANS INDUCTED INTO NATIONAL 4-H HALL OF FAME

Three deceased Iowans were inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame on April 11 in Chevy Chase, Md. An Iowa farm editor also was recognized as an outstanding 4-H alumni. Iowa's inductees were Jessie Field Shambaugh, a Page County teacher who for her work beginning in 1901 is widely regarded as the mother of 4-H; O.H. Benson, a Wright County principal who came up with the clover as the emblem for the Boys and Girls Clubs in 1906; and Fannie Buchanan of Victor, who wrote 4-H songs in the 1920s and 1930s (to hear some of Buchanan’s songs, check out http://www.4hcentennial.org/history/songmain.asp). Loren Kruse, editor of Successful Farming magazine, received the National 4-H Alumni Award.

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E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

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HUMBLED BY GENETICS

"For almost 50 years, we lulled ourselves into believing that, in discovering the molecular basis of genetic information, we had found the 'secret of life'; we were confident that if we could only decode the message in DNA's sequence of nucleotides, we would understand the 'program' that makes an organism what it is. And we marveled at how simple the answer seemed to be. But now, in the call for a functional genomics, we can read at least a tacit acknowledgment of how large the gap between genetic 'information' and biological meaning really is ... marveling not at the simplicity of life's secrets but at their complexity. One might say that structural genomics has given us the insight we needed to confront our own hubris, insight that could illuminate the limits of the vision with which we began." Evelyn Fox Keller, MIT professor of history and philosophy of science (The Century of the Gene, 2000)

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M A R G I N A L I A

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ISU ALUM RECEIVES ARMY'S HIGHEST CIVILIAN AWARD

ISU alumnus Michael Perich ('79 chemistry, entomology and zoology), recently received the Army's highest civilian award. For the past 15 years, Perich has tramped through the jungles of Southeast Asia, Central and South America, Korea and Africa, testing ways to repel mosquitoes. His adventures have included being robbed at gunpoint, shot down while flying over Africa and contracting malaria. He is retiring from the Walter Reed Army Institute for a role in a safer terrain: assistant professor of entomology at Louisiana State University. (ISU Alumni Association's News Flash, April 26)

Next issue: May 6 Deadline: May 3

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AG ONLINE

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EDITORS

Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu, and Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu

Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

SUBSCRIBE

Ag Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University's College of Agriculture, is e-mailed every Monday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag Online subscribe" to edadcock@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag Online unsubscribe."

Iowa State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, sex, marital status, disability or status as a U.S. Vietnam Era Veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact the Director of Affirmative Action, 1031 Wallace Road Office Building, Room 101, (515) 294-7612.

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