Issue: 175

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AG ONLINE

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The College of Agriculture Faculty/Staff Newsletter

Iowa State University

July 20, 2001 No. 175

 

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C O N T E N T S

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COLLEGE NEWS

- Budget update: Final reductions in college budgets

- Budget update: Salary increases

- Summer enrollment just under 1,000

- Aug. 2 orientation for state fair volunteers

- Former ISU microbiologist nominated for USDA post

- Global Consortium conference attracts more than 200

- ISU part of national effort to assess ag bioterrorism

- Gift establishes Norma Hensley Endowed Scholarship

- Stohlmeyer now working for Associate Dean Hoiberg

- Harl and Tweeten to debate ag structure this fall

- Chickens in the pasture and in the garden at field days

- Progress reports from ISU research farms now on web

- Sign up for Pork Chop Open by July 27

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Crossed arms: A closed mind or just goosebumps?

INFOGRAZING

- A bird’s eye view of Reiman Garden progress

- Students scanning pigs at 19 county fairs

EXTERNAL VOICES

- More than ever, we’re people who need people

MARGINALIA

- Save a sturgeon -- eat soybean caviar

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C O L L E G E N E W S

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BUDGET UPDATE: FINAL REDUCTIONS IN COLLEGE BUDGETS

Late in June the College of Agriculture put final touches on its budget, which was reviewed this month by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa. Three college budgets were affected by reductions in state funds. The Experiment Station allocation was reduced by 6 percent or $ 2.2 million. The Experiment Station held another 1 percent to match incentive funds from the provost’s office. These funds will be held in reserve pending results of restructuring discussions. The teaching budget was reduced 3.85 percent or $550,000. (The full 6 percent state reduction for teaching was offset by increased tuition and university reallocations.) The budget for agriculture and natural resources extension dropped 12.5 percent or $775,000, partly due to cuts at the state level and partly due to a reversion required by the vice provost for extension.

BUDGET UPDATE: SALARY INCREASES

Each College of Agriculture department received a 2.86 percent increase on its total salary budget for faculty (0.14 percent held for promotion increases), 3 percent for P&S staff and 3.5 percent for graduate students. For those staff groups, a salary increase of 1.33 percent is required for those whose performance has been satisfactory. Merit staff members will receive across-the-board increases of 3 percent. Merit staff who have not reached step 10 also will receive a step increase on the anniversary date of their employment. No state funds are allocated for salary increases for post-doctoral appointments, but policies and increases for people in these positions are to be similar to those for P&S staff and faculty members. Other university salary guidelines included encouragement to address market and equity issues and a recommendation that higher-than-average percentage increases may be appropriate for P&S employees in pay grades 11-14.

SUMMER ENROLLMENT JUST UNDER 1,000

This summer’s enrollment in the College of Agriculture is 998 students -- 475 undergraduates and 523 graduates. Here are the college’s summer numbers from the past four years:

2000: 979 (487 and 492)

1999: 1,020 (486 and 534)

1998: 1,000 (480 and 520)

1997: 928 (425 and 503)

AUG. 2 ORIENTATION FOR STATE FAIR VOLUNTEERS

Volunteers who have signed up to staff the college’s Iowa State Fair display are invited to an informational meeting on Thursday, Aug. 2, at 8 a.m. in 9 Curtiss. Volunteers will get a sneak preview of this year's display, "2001: A Space Food Odyssey." Refreshments will be served. If you haven't volunteered yet, there are a few shifts still available. Contact Marty Behrens, 4-5616 or behrens@iastate.edu. The fair runs Aug. 9-19.

FORMER ISU MICROBIOLOGIST NOMINATED FOR USDA POST

Elsa Murano, an ISU microbiology faculty member from 1990 to 1995, has been nominated by President Bush to be the USDA’s undersecretary for food safety. Murano holds the Sadie Hatfield Endowed Professorship in Agriculture at Texas A&M University and is director of the Center for Food Safety there. As undersecretary, she would be the USDA’s top food safety expert and would work with federal agencies, the food industry and consumer groups to improve food safety. Her appointment must be confirmed by the Senate.

GLOBAL CONSORTIUM CONFERENCE ATTRACTS MORE THAN 200

More than 200 people from 52 countries attended the Global Consortium of Higher Education and Research for Agriculture Conference in San Francisco, July 12-14. An ISU delegation was led by Provost Rollin Richmond and included College of Agriculture representatives Dean Richard Ross, Wendy Wintersteen, Jerry Miller, Eric Hoiberg, David Acker, Ramesh Kanwar and Robert Martin. At the meeting, Purdue University President Martin Jischke completed his term as founding consortium president and passed the gavel to Dmytro Melnychuk, rector, National Agricultural University, Ukraine. The consortium secretariat, which was established at ISU in 1998 and headed by Acker, will transfer to Kiev, Ukraine, where the next conference will be in the fall of 2003.

ISU PART OF NATIONAL EFFORT TO ASSESS AG BIOTERRORISM

A national committee led by an Iowa State researcher is studying the country's preparedness in dealing with agricultural bioterrorism. Harley Moon, the Frank K. Ramsey Endowed Chair in Veterinary Medicine, chairs the 12-member committee, which includes economics professor Helen Jensen. The Committee on Biological Threats to Agricultural Plants and Animals was formed by the National Research Council with support from the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service. The committee's next meeting is Aug. 14-15 in Washington, D.C. The group will release a final report in June 2002. For more information: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/moon.html.

GIFT ESTABLISHES NORMA HENSLEY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Norma Hensley will provide $30,000 to the College of Agriculture to create the Norma J. Hensley Endowed Scholarship. The endowment will fund a scholarship for the undergraduate student who is president of the Agriculture Student Council. Hensley recently retired from the college after more than 40 years of service. As program assistant to the associate dean of academic programs, she oversaw the awarding of more than 165 scholarships each year. Although not a graduate herself, Hensley's husband, Hubert (animal science, 1966), and three of their children earned degrees from Iowa State.

STOHLMEYER NOW WORKING FOR ASSOCIATE DEAN HOIBERG

Maureen Stohlmeyer is the new secretary for Eric Hoiberg, associate dean for academic programs. She fills the position previously held by Norma Hensley, who has retired. Stohlmeyer had been working for Gerald Klonglan, associate dean for research and national programs, who retired this summer. She has worked in agriculture administration for almost five years and has worked at ISU 16 years. Stohlmeyer can be reached at 4-6614 or mstohlme@iastate.edu.

HARL AND TWEETEN TO DEBATE AG STRUCTURE THIS FALL

In September, two well-known land-grant university agricultural economists will debate the changing structure of agriculture at a program on campus. ISU’s Neil Harl and Ohio State University’s Luther Tweeten will be the featured speakers at the debate sponsored by Gamma Sigma Delta, the honor society for agriculture, and the Leopold Center. The program will be held at 4 p.m., Sept. 24, Pioneer Room, Memorial Union. Harl is a Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture and director of the Center for International Agricultural Finance. Tweeten, who earned his bachelor’s degree and Ph.D. at ISU, is the Anderson Professor of Agricultural Marketing, Policy and Trade at Ohio State.

CHICKENS IN THE PASTURE AND IN THE GARDEN AT FIELD DAYS

Chickens will be in the spotlight at August field days at ISU’s Research and Demonstration Farms. The field days feature the farms’ home demonstration gardens and projects of interest to those living on acreages. Each field day will include "range-raised" broilers housed in pens that are moved to fresh pasture areas by tractors. Each home demonstration garden will feature at least six different chicken-themed plants. Also growing in the gardens are compact vine crops like cantaloupe, watermelon, squash, cucumber and pumpkin. Different plastic mulches are being compared for growing tomatoes. Ornamental plants noted for colorful foliage can be viewed. The field days schedule is:

Aug. 2, Southeast Farm near Crawfordsville. 6:30 p.m.

Aug. 3, Rhodes Farm near Rhodes, 6:30 p.m.

Aug. 7, Muscatine Island Farm, Fruitland, 6:30 p.m.

Aug 8, Northwest Farm near Sutherland, 6:30 p.m.

Aug. 11, Allee Farm near Newell, 1 p.m.

Aug. 18, Northeast Farm near Nashua, 4 p.m.

Aug. 22, Armstrong Farm near Lewis, 6:30 p.m.

Aug. 23, Western Farm near Castana, 6:30 p.m.

Aug. 25, Northern Farm near Kanawha, 4 p.m.

PROGRESS REPORTS FROM ISU RESEARCH FARMS NOW ON WEB

Progress reports on experiments conducted last year on ISU Research and Demonstration Farms now are available on the Web. The reports, which are brief and written for a general audience, are at http://www.ag.iastate.edu/farms/reports.html. Clicking on the title of a report will download a PDF that can be viewed onscreen or printed. Copies of annual reports also are available at each farm, or by contacting the campus office, 4-4620.

SIGN UP FOR PORK CHOP OPEN BY JULY 27

The sign-up deadline is July 27 for the Lauren L. Christian Pork Chop Open on Aug. 4 at Veenker Memorial Golf Course, Ames. The event will raise funds for the Christian endowment at ISU. Cost for the four-person, best-shot tournament is $60 per person or $240 per team. The cost for the reception and dinner only is $30. More information, including a registration form, is available on the Iowa Pork Industry Center website,

http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ipic/events.html.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Aug. 2: State Fair orientation meeting for volunteers, 9 Curtiss, 8 a.m.

Aug. 4: Lauren L. Christian Pork Chop Open, Veenker Memorial Golf Course.

Aug. 9-19: Iowa State Fair

Sept. 6: College of Agriculture fall convocation, Sun Room, Memorial Union, reception at 3:30 p.m., program at 4 p.m.

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C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

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CROSSED ARMS: A CLOSED MIND OR JUST GOOSEBUMPS?

The unwritten rules of body language are being revised as more study is conducted. According to Presentations magazine, there are many myths about body language. For example, there’s the notion that crossed arms signal a closed mind. It’s usually not that simple, the article states. It may indicate a cold room instead. The article also advises presenters to go with their natural gestures, or lack thereof, instead of forcing unnatural ones that might make them look awkward. The article can be found at http://www.presentations.com/resources/trends/2001/04/30_f1_bod_01.html.

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I N F O G R A Z I N G

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF REIMAN GARDEN PROGRESS

A Web Cam is recording progress on construction of the Reiman Gardens conservatory complex, which is expected to be completed next year. You can choose to view photos or movies. Check it out: http://www.fpm.iastate.edu/webcam/reiman/l.

STUDENTS SCANNING PIGS AT 19 COUNTY FAIRS

Three ISU animal science students who work with assistant professor Tom Baas at the Iowa Pork Industry Center are providing scanning services at 19 Iowa county fairs this summer. Their season began July 5 at the Lee and Jefferson County fairs, and will conclude Aug. 2 in Kossuth County. Jay Lampe, Colin Johnson and Doug Newcom are all nationally certified ultrasound technicians who will log hundreds of miles over the next few weeks to provide this service. Last year, the trio worked at 12 counties and scanned an estimated 1,300 hogs.

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E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

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MORE THAN EVER, WE’RE PEOPLE WHO NEED PEOPLE

"We now all live in a society marked by increasing, not decreasing, interconnection and mutual reliance. Each of our lives is affected by more people than ever before. We generally need the cooperation of more people than ever to accomplish even those goals we set for ourselves . . . To exercise control over what happens to you as an individual, you must be involved with others in a process that decides what happens to you and your fellow citizens collectively. We can no longer separate the quality of personal life from the quality of social life. To preserve private space, we must also preserve the commons." From "The Perversion of Autonomy: The Proper Uses of Coercion and Constraints in a Liberal Society," a 1996 book written by psychiatrist Willard Gaylin and political scientist Bruce Jennings.

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M A R G I N A L I A

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SAVE A STURGEON -- EAT SOYBEAN CAVIAR

The black and gray beads glistening atop squares of toast could fool the eye, but the price tag wouldn’t trick any true lover of caviar. Royal Caviar’s Kaviar, made in Glendale, Calif., from soybeans, costs under $15 for 4.4 ounces, compared with $100 or so an ounce for the best sturgeon eggs. The ersatz caviar had its debut last week at the fancy food show sponsored by the National Association for the Specialty Food Trade. Kaviar is not going to put caviar producers out of business, but it might satisfy vegetarians or those concerned about the sturgeon, which is endangered in some parts of the world. (New York Times, July 18)

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AG ONLINE

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NEXT ISSUE: Aug. 3 DEADLINE: Aug. 1

EDITORS

Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu, and Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu

Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

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Ag Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University’s College of Agriculture, is e-mailed every other Friday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag Online subscribe" to bmeyer@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag Online unsubscribe."

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