Issue: 17

COLLEGE NEWS

- Scanes named executive associate dean

- Reception for rural panelists

- Convocation for graduating students

- Ag Ambassadors visit 44 schools

- Mentorship program for new students

- Students in Service: Trees and teaching

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Interview bill of rights

INFOGRAZING

- Balancing work and life

- Rural-urban encounters

EXTERNAL VOICES

- International education

MARGINALIA

- Daystart of champions

C O L L E G E N E W S

SCANES NAMED EXECUTIVE ASSOCIATE DEAN

Colin Scanes has been named executive associate dean of the College

of Agriculture. Scanes, chair of the animal sciences department

at Cook College of Rutgers University, will start on July 15.

The executive associate dean, a new position, has authority delegated

from the Dean for the daily administration of teaching and research

programs. Other duties include overseeing budgets and serving

as associate director of the Experiment Station. In other administrative

news, interviews for associate dean for national programs and

associate dean for state programs should be set in the next few

weeks.

RECEPTION FOR RURAL PANELISTS

ISU President Jischke hosted a reception Monday night at the Center

for Crops Utilization Research in the Food Sciences Building for

panelists, state and federal leaders, ISU administrators and others

involved with the National Rural Conference. More than 175 people

attended, including senior White House and USDA officials. The

conference was held Tuesday in the Memorial Union with President

Clinton, Vice President Gore and Secretary of Agriculture Glickman.

CONVOCATION FOR GRADUATING STUDENTS

The College of Agriculture's spring convocation for graduating

students will be held 9-10:30 a.m., Saturday, May 13, in C.Y.

Stephens Auditorium. Coffee and milk will be served beginning

at 8:15 a.m. Faculty members from each department will assist

in the recognition ceremony. Ron Cornish, who will receive degrees

in agronomy and ag business, will speak. ISU commencement begins

at 2 p.m.

AG AMBASSADORS VISIT 44 SCHOOLS

The College of Agriculture Ambassadors gave informational programs

in 43 high schools in Iowa and one in Illinois during 1994-95.

The ambassadors tell students about the college and agricultural

careers and answer questions about college life. Thirty-three

students from 12 majors served as ambassadors.

MENTORSHIP PROGRAM FOR NEW STUDENTS

The student Agriculture Council is developing a program for next

fall to help new students in the college make the transition to

ISU. The Student Mentorship Program will include Big Brother/Big

Sister activities, a barbecue for freshmen and transfer students,

and informational meetings within departments.

STUDENTS IN SERVICE: TREES AND TEACHING

The student chapter of the Society of American Foresters conducts

an educational program for elementary and high schools called

Forestry in a Nutshell. ISU forestry students work with teachers

and students to develop instruction modules on how forests develop

and how they can be sustainably used by society. They have presented

programs in classrooms and field settings in Ames and surrounding

towns. (Do you have other examples of College of Agriculture students

making a difference for people or communities? E-mail bmeyer@iastate.edu.)

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

APRIL 28 -- Names of departmental representatives for commencement

to Dorothy Blair, 4-8497

MAY 12 -- Livestock odor and waste research preproposals to Bruce

Babcock, 568 Heady

MAY 13 -- Convocation for graduating ag students, C.Y. Stephens

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

INTERVIEW BILL OF RIGHTS

Words & Pictures, a St. Louis consulting firm, recently held

a media training seminar for some ISU staff. Although the session

focused on television interviews, the following "bill of

rights" can apply to other media. When a news reporter calls,

you have the right to know: Who are you? Whom do you represent?

What is the interview about? How long will the interview take?

Who else will be interviewed (if a panel discussion)? Will there

be an audience? Will the interview be live or taped? You also

have the right to decline interviews, but don't think of them

as merely answering questions, think of them as opportunities

to tell your story. Have other questions on interview situations?

Contact Ag Information, 294-5616.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

BALANCING WORK AND LIFE

What do people who successfully balance their work and private

lives have in common? They clarify and act on their values. They

build trusting relationships at work. They ask their bosses and

family members for what they need. And they learn to accept from

themselves less than 100 percent some of the time. These characteristics

come from case studies by the Wharton-Merck Work-Life Roundtable.

(Wall Street Journal, April 12)

RURAL-URBAN ENCOUNTERS

Farm Hands/City Hands is a New York-based non-profit program that

pairs city dwellers who want to work with farm families that need

the extra hands. Project leaders say farmers get affordable, eager

laborers and the chance to convince them that fresh, local produce

tastes better than frozen. Urbanites get fresh air, beautiful

scenery, camaraderie and a sense of problems and payoffs of farm

life. The project also offers one-day excursions to farms that

have attracted corporate executives, at-risk youth, welfare families

and senior citizens. A new program takes homeless people on weekly

trips to farms to plant, cultivate and harvest their own crops.

(Utne Reader, January-February)

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

"(Universities') foreign-study programs often are not academically

rigorous, and most students spend far too much time with other

Americans . . . Today's highly interdependent world demands that

we do better. International education deserves to be taken seriously

and to be held to the same standards, academic and ethical, as

study on campus is," writes John Engle, president, American

University Center of Provence in France (Chronicle of Higher Education,

March 17). Fewer than 2 percent of American undergraduates study

abroad at some time in their college careers, Engle says.

M A R G I N A L I A

DAYSTART OF CHAMPIONS

Few people in the future will eat the traditional three meals

a day. Instead, they'll have five snacks: "daystart,"

"pulsebreak," "humpmunch, "holdmeal"

and "evesnack." This is one forecast from Outlook '95,

a report by The Futurist magazine listing 1994's most thought-provoking

looks into the future.

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