Issue: 16

COLLEGE NEWS

- $1.7 million for livestock issues research

- Experiment Station archives

- Ukrainian faculty on campus

- Assessing Extension programs

- Students in Service: Landscaping

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Express yourself

INFOGRAZING

- College of Agriculture Home Page

- National Rural Conference Home Page

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Flickers of moral sense

MARGINALIA

- You can run but you can't hide #1

- You can run but you can't hide #2

C O L L E G E N E W S

$1.7 MILLION FOR LIVESTOCK ISSUES RESEARCH

Iowa's corn, soybean and pork commodity groups will invest $1.7

million in checkoff dollars over three years for research on livestock

odor and waste management issues. Interested researchers should

submit 1-2 page preproposals by Friday, May 12 to Bruce Babcock,

568 Heady Hall. DEOs have more information, or contact Babcock,

4-5764.

EXPERIMENT STATION ARCHIVES

The University Archives has compiled a list of historical materials

it holds related to the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment

Station. The list is available in departmental offices. The archives

welcomes suggestions on making the Experiment Station collection

more complete.

UKRAINIAN FACULTY ON CAMPUS

For most of April, faculty members from the National Agricultural

University of Ukraine are on campus working with ISU professors

as part of an exchange sponsored by the U.S. Information Agency.

The Ukrainians are working on curriculum revitalization and materials

development. The Ukrainian visitors will present several seminars

in the next week, including ones on engineering education, veterinary

medicine, waste management and agricultural consequences of the

Chernobyl nuclear accident. For more details: International Agriculture

Programs, 4-1851.

ASSESSING EXTENSION PROGRAMS

ISU Extension is one of seven state Extension programs conducting

pilot studies on implementing the Government Performance Review

Act. The act requires federally funded programs to document their

accomplishments. Fifty-seven government agencies around the country

are doing pilot assessments. The seven Extension pilot programs

will try to show social, economic and environment impacts of five

programs: decisions for health; integrated pest management; communities

in economic transition; nutrition, diet and health; and the plight

of the young child. For more information: Lynn Jones, 294-0898.

STUDENTS IN SERVICE: LANDSCAPING

Students in ISU's Horticulture Club have landscaped the grounds

at the Grand Avenue Care Center, including installation of handicapped-accessible

planting beds. The club also has donated plants to a local women's

shelter. (Are there other recent examples of ISU ag students making

a difference for people or communities? E-mail them to bmeyer@iastate.edu.)

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

APRIL 28 -- Names of departmental representatives for commencement

to Dorothy Blair, 4-8497

MAY 12 -- Preproposals on livestock odor and waste research to

Bruce Babcock, 568 Heady

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

EXPRESS YOURSELF

Newspapers, magazines and other publications welcome thoughtful,

well-written opinion pieces. One example: The Scientist, a biweekly

newspaper for researchers that reaches 50,000 readers, seeks "perceptive"

long and short essays from scientists. Examples of issues of interest

to the paper: science education, science ignorance or misunderstanding,

government science policies, representation of women and minorities

in science, and censorship. Ag Information, 294-5616, can offer

advice on submitting opinion pieces and how to best present your

views.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE HOME PAGE

The College of Agriculture has a home page on the World Wide Web

(WWW), located at http://www.ag.iastate.edu. Several departments,

centers and programs have placed information on the ag home page.

Also to be found, under "Newsletters from Various Ag College

Departments," is all the past issues of Ag Online. For more

information about the college's home page, contact Tom Hillson,

294-1543 or thillson@agcollege.ag.iastate.edu.

NATIONAL RURAL CONFERENCE HOME PAGE

Six regional forums on rural issues will precede the National

Rural Conference, April 25 at ISU, which will feature President

Bill Clinton, Vice President Al Gore and Secretary of Agriculture

Dan Glickman. The USDA has set up a World Wide Web site for information

about the forums and other information about rural issues, at:

http://eos.esusda.gov:80/ruralconf/conf.htm. ISU also has a Web

site devoted to the conference, at: http://www.iastate.edu/clinton.html.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

FLICKERS OF MORAL SENSE

"Mankind's moral sense is not a strong beacon light, radiating

outward to illuminate in sharp outline all that it touches. It

is, rather, a small candle flame, casting vague and multiple shadows,

flickering and sputtering in the strong winds of power and passion,

greed and ideology. But brought close to the heart and cupped

in one's hands, it dispels the darkness and warms the soul."

From a piece in a June 1993 Commentary magazine written by James

Q. Wilson, professor of management and public policy at UCLA,

and author of The Moral Sense.

M A R G I N A L I A

YOU CAN RUN BUT YOU CAN'T HIDE #1

Schering-Plough Corp. and Destron Fearing Corp. plan to offer

coded, electronic implants that can be read by a scanner when

your pet goes astray. The Home-Again microchip ID system uses

implants the size of a grain of rice that can be injected by a

veterinarian for between $25 and $50, and a registration system

maintained by the American Kennel Club, to reunite furry friend

and owner. (Wall Street Journal, March 15)

YOU CAN RUN BUT YOU CAN'T HIDE #2

Worried when your teenager uses the family car? A new microprocessor

called DriveRight Responsible Vehicle Monitor records how the

car has been driven over a period of up to 10 days. It monitors

whether limits are exceeded for predetermined speed, acceleration

and deceleration. The device notes each infraction and an alarm

sounds in the car when limits are exceeded. Information can be

downloaded into your home PC for further analysis. Its record

is password-protected, and it operates off the car's 12-volt battery

or a secondary 260-hour battery pack. (Tampa Tribune, March 14)

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