Issue: 157

COLLEGE NEWS

- AgriTalk farm policy college tour stops on campus

- Brown-bag lunch on Iowa 2010 program rescheduled for Nov. 2

- Faculty to vote on 2001-03 curricula and courses

- Utilization center closes after ten-year run

- Environmental issues in animal ag: Think Tank on Oct. 30

- ISU alum to give Pierre Lecture in Soil Science Nov. 1

- GMO panel discussion Nov. 9 for Institute on World Affairs

- Scientific index developed for phosphorus management

- Study-abroad offered in Honduras for first time

- Graduate-level study abroad planned to Costa Rica

- AST Club brings home national trophy again

- Sigma Alpha holds drive to help needy families

- Consider volunteering for Ames Lab/ISU Science Bowl

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- When words fail, remember the audience

INFOGRAZING

- Honesty tops personal traits sought by employers

- Top traits sought by three ag employers

INTERNAL VOICES

- After ISU program, manure applicators plan changes

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Teaching science: Slick visuals and unedited thinking

MARGINALIA

- Secret ingredient no secret at plant pathology’s bake-off

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C O L L E G E N E W S

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AGRITALK FARM POLICY COLLEGE TOUR STOPS ON CAMPUS

Today (Friday) AgriTalk, a nationally syndicated radio talk show, sponsored a farm policy forum on campus. ISU was one of three stops in a college tour by AgriTalk. Hosted by ISU economist Mark Edelman's ag policy class, the forum was taped for broadcast on Nov. 20. Panelists included Sen. Chuck Grassley, Rep. Leonard Boswell, members of the Senate and House agriculture committees, and Edelman. Dean Ross welcomed the panelists. Central Iowa stations that carry AgriTalk include KWBG (Boone), 1590 AM; KFJB (Marshalltown), 1230 AM; and KQWC (Webster City), 1570 AM and 95.7 FM.

BROWN-BAG LUNCH ON IOWA 2010 RESCHEDULED FOR NOV. 2

Due to the conflict this week with ISU Extension's annual conference, the next College of Agriculture brown-bag lunch has been rescheduled for Thursday, Nov. 2, in 142 Curtiss. The topic will be the role of the college in Governor Vilsack's Iowa 2010, a program to develop a plan for the state's future. Faculty, staff and students are invited. Beverages and dessert will be provided. For more information on Iowa 2010: http://www.iowa2010.state.ia.us/Home.htm.

FACULTY TO VOTE ON 2001-03 CURRICULA AND COURSES

The College of Agriculture’s curriculum committee has voted to accept the college’s curricula and courses for the 2001-03 catalog. Now the faculty must vote on the proposal. Faculty can review a summary on the Web, http://www.ag.iastate.edu/coareport2001_2003.html. If hard copy is needed, contact Joyce Shiers, 4-2518, or Joe Colletti, 4-4912. Faculty can vote by e-mailing to committee chair Colletti, colletti@iastate.edu, by 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 30.

UTILIZATION CENTER CLOSES AFTER TEN-YEAR RUN

At last week’s meeting of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, the board approved an ISU request to close the Utilization Center for Agricultural Products. UCAP was established in 1990 to bring the Center for Crops Utilization Research and the Meat Export Research Center under one administrative structure. UCAP also included the Food Safety Consortium, Linear Accelerator Facility and the NASA Food Technology Commercial Space Center. Last year organizational changes moved CCUR and MERC outside the UCAP umbrella. This past summer a majority of the entities associated with UCAP agreed the center should be dissolved.

ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN ANIMAL AG: THINK TANK ON OCT. 30

Wendy Powers-Schilling, animal science, will speak on the impact of environmental issues on the future of animal agriculture at the next Think Tank on Animal Agriculture meeting, Monday, Oct. 30, Cardinal Room, Memorial Union. The meeting begins with a social time at 6 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m. and discussion at 7 p.m. Make a reservation by calling Jane Linn, 4-2063. Cost is $11, payable at the door. For more information: Don Beitz, dcbeitz@iastate.edu, or Gene Freeman, genef@iastate.edu.

ISU ALUM TO GIVE PIERRE LECTURE IN SOIL SCIENCE NOV. 1

The 2000 Pierre Lecture in Soil Science will be given Wednesday, Nov. 1, by Rienk van der Ploeg, University of Hannover in Germany. His topic will be "Environmental Impacts of Agricultural Land Use Changes in Central Europe Since World War II." The lecture will be held at 4:10 p.m., 2050 Agronomy. Van der Ploeg is professor of soil science at the university’s Institute of Soil Science. He has a master’s degree (’70) and doctorate (’72) from ISU. On Tuesday, Oct. 31, van der Ploeg will discuss European pioneers of agronomy at 1:10 p.m., 3140 Agronomy. In that seminar, he will detail early developments in plant nutrition theory and 19th century developments in agricultural physics. Faculty and others who wish to meet with van der Ploeg during his visit should contact Michael Thompson, 4-2415 or mlthomps@iastate.edu.

GMO PANEL DISCUSSION NOV. 9 FOR INSTITUTE ON WORLD AFFAIRS

This year’s Institute on World Affairs lecture series will include a Nov. 9 panel discussion on "Social Conflict, Trade Disputes and Genetically Modified Organisms." Panelists will include Dean Ross; John Obrycki, entomology; Charlotte Bronson, plant pathology; Lorna Michael Butler, Wallace Chair for Sustainable Agriculture; Dermot Hayes, economics; and Colin Scanes, associate dean and interim director, Plant Sciences Institute. The discussion begins at noon in the Pioneer Room, Memorial Union.

SCIENTIFIC INDEX DEVELOPED FOR PHOSPHORUS MANAGEMENT

A team of ISU scientists and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service staff has developed a new tool to help farmers manage phosphorus. Gerald Miller, associate dean, coordinated the effort. The Iowa Phosphorus Index can help calculate the potential for phosphorus loss from a field. The index is the culmination of a year-long process initiated by the USDA state technical committee. That committee asked its nutrient management subcommittee to develop the index, which will be used by state NRCS staff to provide assistance on federal nutrient management guidelines. An electronic version and user’s guide eventually will be posted on the Web, http://www.ia.nrcs.usda.gov.

STUDY-ABROAD OFFERED IN HONDURAS FOR FIRST TIME

For the first time, the college is offering a study-abroad program to Honduras. During spring break 2001, students will learn about tropical agriculture, natural resources and food production in the country. An informational meeting for students will be held at 5 p.m., Monday, Oct. 30, 2020 Agronomy. For more information: Micheal Owen, 4-1923 or mdowen@iastate.edu, or Alejandrina Carrasco, 4-9164 or carrasco@iastate.edu.

GRADUATE-LEVEL STUDY ABROAD PLANNED TO COSTA RICA

An interdisciplinary study-abroad course in tropical crops will be held during spring semester, including a trip to Costa Rica during spring break. The graduate-level course, "Integrated Management of Tropical Crops," will emphasize application of sustainable principles and integrated pest management tactics to tropical agriculture. For more information: Mark Gleason, 4-0579; Donald Lewis, 4-1102; or Kathleen Delate, 4-7069.

AST CLUB BRINGS HOME NATIONAL TROPHY AGAIN

For the second year in a row, the Agricultural Systems Technology Club has received the top honor from the American Society of Agricultural Engineers. The Equipment Manufacturers Institute (EMI) Trophy was awarded to the ISU club for the most outstanding record of activities and achievements for the year. The award was presented during ASAE’s annual meeting last month in Milwaukee. Club advisers are Charles Schwab and Tom Brumm, agricultural and biosystems engineering.

SIGMA ALPHA HOLDS DRIVE TO HELP NEEDY FAMILIES

The ISU chapter of Sigma Alpha, the professional organization for women in agriculture, conducted a community service project this month for Mid-Iowa Community Action, a nonprofit human services agency. The students collected personal hygiene products such as toothbrushes, shampoo and toilet paper. MICA will distribute the items to families in need.

CONSIDER VOLUNTEERING FOR AMES LAB/ISU SCIENCE BOWL

The 11th annual Ames Lab / ISU Science Bowl will be held Jan. 27. The organizers are looking for volunteers from many disciplines to serve as judges. For more information: Saren Johnston, 4-3474 or sarenj@ameslab.gov.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Oct. 30: Larry Wulf, agricultural and biosystems engineering, Iowa State Water Resources Research Institute seminar, 1131 National Swine Research and Information Center, 4:10 p.m.

Nov. 1: 2000 Pierre Lecture in Soil Science, Rienk van der Ploeg, University of Hannover, 2050 Agronomy, 4:10 p.m.

Nov. 9: GMO panel discussion, Institute on World Affairs, Pioneer Room, Memorial Union, noon.

Nov 13: Hongling Zhang, forestry, Iowa State Water Resources Research Institute seminar, 1131 National Swine Research and Information Center, 4:10 p.m.

Nov. 15: Deadline, International Funding for Graduate Students and Postdocs Program, 4-8493.

Nov. 29: ISU women’s basketball game sponsored by College of Agriculture, 4-7677.

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C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

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WHEN WORDS FAIL, REMEMBER THE AUDIENCE

"There's no mystery to writing well," writes Patricia O'Connor in her 1999 book, "Words Fail Me." "It's a skill that just about anyone can learn, more craft than art. When words fail us, as they often do, the reasons are usually simple. So are the solutions." The former editor at the New York Book Review advises keeping the audience in mind when beginning a writing project. "For better or worse, audience is everything, no matter what you write . . . Unless your audience absolutely demands big words, have the courage not to use them."

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I N F O G R A Z I N G

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HONESTY TOPS PERSONAL TRAITS SOUGHT BY EMPLOYERS

According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, the top 10 personal characteristics that employers seek in job candidates are (beginning with number 1): honesty/integrity; motivation/initiative; communication skills; self-confidence; flexibility; interpersonal skills; strong work ethic; teamwork skills; leadership skills; and enthusiasm.

TOP TRAITS SOUGHT BY THREE AG EMPLOYERS

In 1998, Allison Hopkey, then a graduate student in agricultural education and studies, asked three agricultural employers to list the top competencies they sought in job candidates. American Cyanamid looked for applied intelligence; communication skills; creativity; decision-making; leadership; initiative; integrity; persuasion/sales ability; planning/organization; and teamwork. Growmark wanted communication skills; goal-setting; leadership; organization/time management; self-starter/initiative; technical knowledge; and work ethic. Novartis looked for applied intelligence; communication skills; leadership; initiative; integrity; sales ability; and sensitivity. (Ag Comm Newsletter, November 1998)

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I N T E R N A L V O I C E S

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AFTER ISU PROGRAM, MANURE APPLICATORS PLAN CHANGES

Of the 420 commercial applicators who participated in ISU Extension’s manure applicator training programs this year, one-fourth said they plan to change how they do business because of the information they received. Similar results were found among the 886 confinement site manure applicators who took the training. About 60 percent of the participants indicated they were already using recommended practices. "We’re very pleased with the results," said Angela Rieck-Hinz, program coordinator in the agronomy department. "One of the surprises for us was the number of applicators who plan to make changes in their practices based on what they learned at the certification training meetings. We emphasize different topics each year, and this was the year to focus on manure storage and handling, land application and handling emergencies." This is the second year of the certification program, which is administered by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

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E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

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TEACHING SCIENCE: SLICK VISUALS AND UNEDITED THINKING

"Seeing is of course indispensable to learning, particularly in science, which is of the eye. Visual aids therefore have a place in the laboratory. And most students, not being future scientists, will learn more from good films of important experiments than from their own fumbling attempts. But sometimes they must fumble too, and have a teacher who fumbles on occasion, and thinks all the time he is in class. One learns not by a photographic copying of things shown, but by an internal drama imitative of the action witnessed. When the instructor gropes for a word, corrects himself, interjects a comment or an analogy not directly called for, he gives a spectacle of man thinking which no slick film or televised show will provide." Historian and educator Jacques Barzun, from his 1964 book, "Science: The Glorious Entertainment."

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M A R G I N A L I A

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SECRET INGREDIENT NO SECRET AT PLANT PATHOLOGY’S BAKE-OFF

The following item ran in the Department of Plant Pathology’s Oct. 23 newsletter: "Plant Pathology held its annual Apple-Pumpkin Bake-off on Oct. 13. There were 15 entries, and 52 taster/judges participated. The commercial apple pie that was submitted as a control entry received the least number of votes . . . The winning apply entry was Chris Marett’s sour cream apple pie. Tom Maier entered a pumpkin cheesecake pie that won first prize in the pumpkin category. Both recipes contain massive amounts of sour cream. This is the single ingredient that has been the mainstay of more winning entries than any other in past bake-offs. Chris is a research associate in the Nematology Lab and Tom is a research associate on Thomas Baum’s project. Both are willing to share their recipes."

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AG ONLINE

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NEXT ISSUE: Nov. 10 DEADLINE: Nov. 8

EDITORS

Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu, and Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu

Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

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