Issue: 152

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C O N T E N T S

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COLLEGE NEWS

- Attend ag fall convocation and student barbecue Aug. 24

- Ag administrative appointments announced

- Bundy named new college development officer

- Moschini named Pioneer Chair in science, tech policy

- Simons named director of Social, Behavioral Institute

- Open forums for agronomy finalists set

- Flora back as director of NCRCRD

- Ag Career Services unveils new online services

- I-HELP fellows arrive on campus

- Trip to Mexico planned for ISU Extension staff

- Welcome-back reception for study-abroad participants

- Deadlines for study-abroad program proposals

- ISU Extension helping Hispanic families grow garden crops

- New ISU book helps families discuss farm hazards

- Welcome reception for Kirschenmann on Sept. 12

- Late-summer field days begin at ISU research farms

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Agricultural images available on USDA-ARS Web site

INFOGRAZING

- Grants to be awarded in September for USDA’S IFAFS

- Aug. 25 deadline for entrepreneur scholars; kickoff set

- Steinke to work on Congressional relations for ISU

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Fermi on scholarly lectures

MARGINALIA

- Ag mechanization a top ten mechanical achievement

- The other nine great achievements

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C O L L E G E N E W S

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ATTEND AG FALL CONVOCATION AND STUDENT BARBECUE AUG. 24

The College of Agriculture fall convocation will be held Thursday, Aug. 24, in the Sun Room, Memorial Union. Social time begins at 3:30 p.m., with a program at 4 p.m. New faculty and staff will be introduced. At 5 p.m., faculty and staff are encouraged to attend a barbecue to welcome new freshmen and transfer students. The barbecue will run until 7 p.m. in the Agronomy Courtyard. Ag student clubs will have booths on their activities. In case of rain, the barbecue will move to the Farm Bureau Pavilion, Kildee Hall.

AG ADMINISTRATIVE APPOINTMENTS ANNOUNCED

Wendy Wintersteen has been named senior associate dean of the College of Agriculture. She will serve in this capacity for the duration of Richard Ross’s tenure as dean. Wintersteen has been filling this role on an interim appointment. Wintersteen’s previous position will continue to be filled by Jerry DeWitt, who serves as interim director of agriculture and natural resources extension.

BUNDY NAMED NEW COLLEGE DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

Richard Bundy III is the new development officer for the College of Agriculture. He starts on Aug. 21. Bundy previously was director of major gifts for the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University. William Messina, who served in the position since 1998, will be a temporary instructor in the Department of Horticulture this fall. Agriculture Development is located in 20 Curtiss. Bundy’s phone number is 4-9088.

MOSCHINI NAMED PIONEER CHAIR IN SCIENCE, TECH POLICY

Economics professor GianCarlo Moschini has been named the Pioneer Hi-Bred International Chair in Science and Technology Policy. He will conduct research in the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development on the impact of new technologies on agriculture, public versus private ownership of intellectual property rights, the economics of research and development and other issues. The chair was established in 1998 with $1 million in gifts from Pioneer.

SIMONS NAMED DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL, BEHAVIORAL INSTITUTE

Ronald Simons has been named director of the Institute for Social and Behavioral Research, effective Aug. 1. Also, Carolyn Cutrona, professor of psychology, has been named associate director. Simons, a sociology professor, had been the institute’s associate director for 10 years. He succeeds Rand Conger, who had served as director since the institute was established in 1988. Conger will return to the sociology faculty to teach and conduct research.

OPEN FORUMS FOR AGRONOMY FINALISTS SET

Open forums have been set for the six finalists in the search for a new head of the agronomy department. Each presentation will be held from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. in 3140 Agronomy. Open-forum dates and finalists are: Aug. 24, Joseph Stucki, professor of agronomy, University of Illinois; Sept. 6, Ronald Turco, professor of agronomy and director, Environmental Sciences and Engineering Institute, Purdue University; Sept. 12, James Germida, professor and head, Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan; Sept. 18, Steven Fales, professor and head, Department of Agronomy, Pennsylvania State University; Sept. 20, Kenneth Cassman, professor and head, Department of Agronomy, University of Nebraska; Sept. 27, Donald Sparks, professor and chair, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware.

FLORA BACK AS DIRECTOR OF NCRCRD

On July 1 Cornelia Flora returned to her position as director of the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development. She had been on a one-year sabbatical that included a term as the endowed chair in sustainable agriculture systems at the Minnesota Institute of Sustainable Agriculture, University of Minnesota. Willis Goudy, University Professor of sociology, served as the center’s interim director.

AG CAREER SERVICES UNVEILS NEW ONLINE SERVICES

This week Ag Career Services unveiled an online job database for students, alumni and employers. The free service allows students and alums to put their names and contact information in the database along with career interests and resumes. Current undergrads can check job postings, review interview schedules and sign up for interviews. Companies that register can make resume queries and access interview schedules. Students and alumni can register by going to: http://www.agcareer.iastate.edu/asi/stulogin.htm. Those without Web access may call Mike Gaul, career services director, 4-4725. Funding for the computer hardware and software was provided by the ISU Agricultural Foundation, Cargill Inc., Growmark Inc., IBP Inc. and Excel Corp.

I-HELP FELLOWS ARRIVE ON CAMPUS

An international group has arrived at ISU to learn how to become better leaders in the struggle to produce enough food while preserving natural resources. The visit is the first in the International Higher Education Loan Program (I-HELP), sponsored by the Global Consortium of Higher Education and Research for Agriculture. The I-HELP fellows are professors and graduate students from 12 countries who will stay for three months. Each will have an ISU mentor. Mentors include faculty from agricultural and biosystems engineering, agronomy, animal science, economics, food science and human nutrition, horticulture, sociology and forestry. The College of Agriculture will host a reception for the I-HELP fellows on Aug. 21.

TRIP TO MEXICO PLANNED FOR ISU EXTENSION STAFF

The colleges of agriculture and veterinary medicine are organizing a trip to Mexico for ISU Extension staff. The professional development program is meant for persons with little or no international experience, and who want to learn more about Mexican culture and agriculture and how to expand Iowa-Mexico links. The trip will take place Feb. 10-18, 2001. Participation is limited to about 10 people. Application deadline is Oct. 1. To apply, contact Jerry DeWitt, 4-7801 or jdewitt@iastate.edu, or Nolan Hartwig, 4-8791 or nhartwig@iastate.edu.

WELCOME-BACK RECEPTION FOR STUDY-ABROAD PARTICIPANTS

The Agriculture Study-Abroad Office will host a welcome-back reception on Aug. 28 for students, faculty and staff who participated in ag study-abroad programs during 1999-2000. The reception will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Cardinal Room, Memorial Union. Students will share their experiences and learn how to put them to use in their courses and career plans. For more information: Shelley Taylor, 4-5393.

DEADLINES FOR STUDY-ABROAD PROGRAM PROPOSALS

Deadlines have changed for submitting study-abroad proposals for trips planned during spring semester 2001 and summer semester 2001. For summer 2001 programs, the deadline is Oct. 1. For spring 2001 programs, the deadline is Oct. 30. The College of Agriculture Study-Abroad Office can help agriculture faculty and staff with their proposals. For more information: Shelley Taylor, 4-5393.

ISU EXTENSION HELPING HISPANIC FAMILIES GROW GARDEN CROPS

Hot peppers and tomatillos aren't standard fare in most Iowa vegetable gardens. In Storm Lake’s Diversity Gardens, however, Hispanic families are growing them and other produce not available locally. The families are volunteers in a pilot program to determine the feasibility of growing and marketing specific garden crops. Produce is used by the families or marketed at the local farmers’ market. ISU Extension horticulturist Eldon Everhart helped to organize the gardens, approve crop selection and make pest-control suggestions. Other agencies involved include USDA-NRCS, Pastoral Outreach Ministry (Catholic Diocese of Sioux City), Comm ‘Unity’ Education, Ag Connect and IBP Inc.

NEW ISU BOOK HELPS FAMILIES DISCUSS FARM HAZARDS

It’s estimated that more than 100 children die and almost 22,000 are seriously injured each year on farms. ISU Extension has published a new book to help families talk about farm hazards. "What Would You Do? Helping Young Children Understand Farm Hazards" features illustrations for children and information for parents. ISU Extension farm safety specialist Charles Schwab helped write and develop the book. For more information: http://www.ae.iastate.edu/safety.htm.

WELCOME RECEPTION FOR KIRSCHENMANN ON SEPT. 12

A welcome reception for Fred Kirschenmann, director of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, will be held Sept. 12, 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Campanile Room, Memorial Union. There will be a brief program at 4 p.m. Later that evening, Kirschenmann will speak at the annual Gamma Sigma Delta meeting and dinner in the Sun Room. Kirschenmann started July 1.

LATE-SUMMER FIELD DAYS BEGIN AT ISU RESEARCH FARMS

A round of late-summer field days begins Aug. 22 at ISU’s research and demonstration farms. Directions to the farms can be found at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/farms/. Locations, topics and dates are:

- McNay Farm, Chariton, tiling, Aug. 22-23, 9 a.m.

- Northwest Farm, Doon, crops, Aug. 23, 9 a.m.

- Neely-Kinyon Farm, Greenfield, crops, Aug. 24, 4 p.m.

- Northeast Farm, Nashua, crops and GPS, Aug. 24, 2 and 6 p.m.

- McNay Farm, Chariton, crops, livestock and horticulture, Sept. 7, 4 p.m.

- Southeast Farm, Crawfordsville, crops, Sept. 12, 1 p.m.

- Lauren Christian Swine Farm, Atlantic, swine, Sept. 19, 4 p.m.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Aug. 18: Deadline, Brenton Center Instructor Assistance Program, 4-0045

Aug. 22: ISU Fall Convocation, 3:15 p.m., Sun Room

Aug. 24: College of Agriculture Fall Convocation, 4 p.m., Sun Room

Aug. 24: Barbecue for ag freshmen/transfer students, 5 p.m., Agronomy Courtyard

Aug. 29-31: Carbon: Exploring Benefits to Farmers and Society Conference, Des Moines, http://www.cvrcd.org/carbon.htm

Aug. 31: Iowa Food Industry Day, Food Sciences Building, 4-3394

Sept. 2: Iowa Commodity Classic/Taste of Iowa, before Cyclones football game, http://www.ag.iastate.edu/goodfood

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C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

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AGRICULTURAL IMAGES AVAILABLE ON USDA-ARS WEB SITE

If you’re looking for agricultural images, the USDA's Agricultural Research Service is one source to check. Its online Image Gallery is a source of high-quality digital photographs taken by the ARS information staff. The images are filed in these categories: lab research, plants, animals, illustrations, crops, education insects, fruits/veggies and field research. The images can be downloaded in three sizes by copying the desired image from your browser. There also is a search function. Check it out at: http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/graphics/photos/index.html

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I N F O G R A Z I N G

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GRANTS TO BE AWARDED IN SEPTEMBER FOR USDA’S IFAFS

The USDA received more than 1,000 responses to a March request for proposals for the new Initiative for Future Agriculture and Food Systems. Total funding requests exceeded $1.4 billion, and funds available total $113 million. Proposals came from all but one of the land-grant universities and 40 other college and universities. (Fifty-nine proposals came from ISU.) Proposals also came from federal labs and more than 50 private organizations. The USDA's Cooperative Research Education and Extension Service expects to award the grants in early September.

AUG. 25 DEADLINE FOR ENTREPRENEUR SCHOLARS; KICKOFF SET

Aug. 25 is the application deadline for the ISU Pappajohn Center’s Fall 2000 Reiman Scholars in Entrepreneurship Internship Program. Internships are open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. Interns will receive $2,500 and be required to work 200 hours. Pick up applications at Ag Career Services, 141 Curtiss, or download at http://www.isupjcenter.org. Also, the Pappajohn Center will host an Entrepreneur Kickoff, 5 to 7 p.m., Aug. 31, in the Sun Room, Memorial Union. Students are encouraged to attend to meet others with interests in entrepreneurship, including employers. Faculty and staff involved in entrepreneurship programs also are invited to attend.

STEINKE TO WORK ON CONGRESSIONAL RELATIONS FOR ISU

Gary Steinke, ISU’s director of government relations, will handle Congressional relations until a replacement is found for Stuart Hadley. Hadley, who has left ISU, was an associate director of government relations. Andy Baumert will be the liaison with the Iowa Legislature.

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E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

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FERMI ON SCHOLARLY LECTURES

"Before I came here I was confused about this subject. Having listened to your lecture I am still confused. But on a higher level." Enrico Fermi, 1901-1954.

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M A R G I N A L I A

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AG MECHANIZATION A TOP TEN MECHANICAL ACHIEVEMENT

Agricultural mechanization is one of the 10 greatest mechanical engineering achievements of the 20th century, according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. An article in the August edition of ASME’s magazine traces the history of ag mechanization. The article recognizes the tiller, reaper and hay baler, as well as innovations aided by the introduction of electric power on the farm, such as the milking machine, irrigation pump and climate control system for greenhouses. These machines and technologies increased farm production and contributed to food security, in the process "releasing the population to pursue intellectual, cultural and social development that has resulted in our modern society."

THE OTHER NINE GREAT ACHIEVEMENTS

According to ASME, the other nine greatest mechanical engineering achievements of the 20th century are integrated circuit mass production, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing technology (CAD/CAM), bioengineering, codes and standards, air conditioning and refrigeration, the airplane, power generation, the Apollo space program and the automobile.

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AG ONLINE

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NEXT ISSUE: Sept. 1 DEADLINE: Aug. 30

EDITORS

Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu, and Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu

Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

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Ag Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University’s College of Agriculture, is e-mailed every other Friday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag Online subscribe" to bmeyer@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag Online unsubscribe."

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