Issue: 138

...................................................

AG ONLINE

...................................................

The College of Agriculture Faculty/Staff Newsletter

Iowa State University

February 4, 2000 No. 138

...................................................

C O N T E N T S

...................................................

COLLEGE NEWS

- Wintersteen named interim executive associate dean

- Full agenda for next strategic planning meeting

- Spring enrollment in college down 75 students

- ISU receives USDA funds to support ag graduate students

- Centerville woman’s bequest provides for ag scholarships

- Tribal colleges, ISU work on curriculum development

- Remind students about upperclassmen scholarships

- Three-week winter break slightly favored in college

- Alternative marketing theme for sustainable ag series

- New date for Ag Education Summit

- Ag and LAS colleges sponsor internship in Panama

- Agronomy grad club plans display at children’s museum

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Print is the perfect place for big ideas

INFOGRAZING

- Top ten oldest ag-related buildings at ISU

INTERNAL VOICES

- Provost: Who will provide future distance education courses?

EXTERNAL VOICES

- The condition of undergraduate education, 1999

MARGINALIA

- The future is now for high-tech underwear

...................................................

C O L L E G E N E W S

...................................................

WINTERSTEEN NAMED INTERIM EXECUTIVE ASSOCIATE DEAN

Wendy Wintersteen has taken on the post of interim executive associate dean

in the College of Agriculture, effective Feb. 1. Wintersteen was named to the post by Richard Ross, who began serving as interim dean of agriculture on Feb. 1. Wintersteen succeeds Colin Scanes, who is serving as interim director of the Plant Sciences Institute. "Creating a world-class Plant Sciences Institute is a top university priority, and the interim director needs to be able to devote full attention to that effort," said Provost Rollin Richmond. Scanes will continue to serve as an associate dean in the College of Agriculture. Wintersteen is director of agriculture and natural resources extension and will continue in that position while serving as executive associate dean.

FULL AGENDA FOR NEXT STRATEGIC PLANNING MEETING

Faculty and staff are welcome to attend any part or all of the next College of Agriculture strategic planning meeting on Feb. 15 in the Sun Room, Memorial Union. Refreshments begin at 9:30 a.m. Agenda topics include the agricultural business community; mission, vision and values; undergraduate education; and natural resources. Paul Johnson, director of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, and several agribusiness representatives plan to speak. Subcommittees will report on curriculum, extension, research and diversity. For more information: Maureen Stohlmeyer, 4-4763 or mstohleme@iastate.edu.

SPRING ENROLLMENT IN COLLEGE DOWN 75 STUDENTS

The College of Agriculture enrolled 3,314 students this spring, a decrease of 75 from spring 1999’s enrollment of 3,389. The spring enrollment includes 2,707 undergraduate students -- 42 fewer than last year. Graduate enrollment is 607, which is 33 fewer than spring 1999. Overall, ISU enrolled 24,333 students this spring, an increase of 460 compared with spring 1999’s enrollment of 23,873.

ISU RECEIVES USDA FUNDS TO SUPPORT AG GRADUATE STUDENTS

ISU has received $483,000 in USDA funds to help outstanding graduate students pursue their degrees in food and agricultural sciences. At ISU the funds will provide fellowships to support three years of training for seven graduate students. Three of the fellows will study animal biotechnology; two will study plant biotechnology; and two will study food science and human nutrition. Nationwide, 91 students at 21 universities will receive support. The USDA Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate Fellowship Grants Program aims to help meet the nation’s ongoing need for scientific and professional expertise in food and agricultural sciences.

CENTERVILLE WOMAN’S BEQUEST PROVIDES FOR AG SCHOLARSHIPS

Nadyne Harris of Centerville died Nov. 22, 1999, leaving in her will a bequest of $200,000 for agricultural scholarships at ISU. College development officer Bill Messina said, "This is one of those special cases of a person with no direct connection to ISU or the College of Agriculture giving a substantial sum for scholarships. But Nadyne’s husband, Guy, worked with a feed and grain business in Centerville, and agriculture was his life." Harris’s will also left money for arts and sciences at the University of Iowa and University of Northern Iowa. The first Nadyne Harris Scholarships will be awarded to ISU ag students in 2001.

TRIBAL COLLEGES, ISU WORK ON CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

This weekend, Feb. 4-5, educators from four tribal colleges will be on campus to work with College of Agriculture faculty in a curriculum development workshop. Crownpoint Institute of Technology, Haskell Indian Nations University, Oglala Lakota Community College and Lac Courte Orielles Ojibwa Community College are partners with ISU on the project, which is funded by a USDA Higher Education Challenge Grant. Over the next few months, each tribal college will develop a course to strengthen its natural resources and environmental studies programs. Courses will be designed for delivery on the Internet and made accessible to other institutions. Harold Crawford, agricultural education and studies, and Tom Ingebritsen, zoology and genetics, lead the project.

REMIND STUDENTS ABOUT UPPERCLASSMEN SCHOLARSHIPS

Advisers are reminded to tell students that applications for upperclassmen scholarships can be picked up from Norma Hensley, 134 Curtiss. The deadline for returning applications is March 3. For more information: Norma Hensley, 4-6614 or nhensley@iastate.edu.

THREE-WEEK WINTER BREAK SLIGHTLY FAVORED IN COLLEGE

In a recent survey, College of Agriculture faculty gave a slight edge to the three-week break between fall and spring semesters, according to Tom Loynachan, agronomy, who serves as the college’s representative on the university’s calendar committee. Of the 174 who voted, 90 preferred the three-week break and 84 preferred the four-week break. The calendar committee will meet on Feb. 24 and review input on the break from around the university. The committee will make a recommendation to the Provost. The Board of Regents will make the final decision. For more information: http://www.public.iastate.edu/~teloynac/uc.html.

ALTERNATIVE MARKETING THEME FOR SUSTAINABLE AG SERIES

The spring-semester sustainable agriculture seminar, "Using Alternative Marketing Strategies to Sustain Agriculture," began in January and continues on Wednesday nights through March. Each seminar, which is broadcast over the ICN, begins at 7 p.m. in 9 Brenton Center, Curtiss Hall. The program, which is supported by the Leopold Center, is free to the public. For more information: Jim Russell, 4-4631, or jrussell@iastate.edu. Check the Web at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/centers/leopold/00sustagseminar.html.

NEW DATE FOR AG EDUCATION SUMMIT

The date has been changed for "The Summit on the Future of Agricultural Education." The new date is March 9 at the State Historical Building in Des Moines. The summit’s theme is "Education: The Key to the Future of Agriculture." It will bring together educators, agribusiness leaders and government officials to discuss education’s role in the future of agriculture. The meeting will center on implementing the "Grand Plan for Agricultural Education in Iowa," a report issued last year by the Governor's Council on Agricultural Education. Robert Martin, head of the agricultural education and studies department, chairs the council.

AG AND LAS COLLEGES SPONSOR INTERNSHIP IN PANAMA

The College of Agriculture and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are sponsoring a summer study-abroad program in Panama, May 10 to July 18. The course is aimed at undergraduate students interested in international development, international agriculture, Latin American studies, and tropical social and biological systems. Students from agronomy, forestry, anthropology, sociology, political science, human nutrition and other disciplines will participate in classes before departure, and conduct individual research projects. For more information: Eduarda Becerra, 4-3972 or ebecerra@iastate.edu.

AGRONOMY GRAD CLUB PLANS DISPLAY AT CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

On Saturday, Feb. 12, the Agronomy Graduate Student Club will have a display at the new children’s museum at North Grand Mall in Ames. Club members will involve visiting kids in activities that demonstrate the origins of food and the connection between agriculture and the dinner table. For more information: John Guretzky, 4-4504, or Adam Davis, 4-2800.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Feb. 10: Jean Steiner, Leopold Center candidate open forum, 9 Brenton Center, 3 p.m.

Feb. 15: "GMO/Non-GMO Seeds: Policy, Science and Supply," Seed Technology Conference, Scheman Building.

Feb. 22: Stimulating Interaction and Incorporating Communication Assignments in Large Group Lectures, Ag Comm workshop, noon, 8 Brenton Center.

Feb. 24: "GMO 2000: Assessing Risk and Seeking Opportunities," Scheman Building.

Feb. 28: E-commerce: The ‘Net’ Effect on Agribusiness," CARD Agricultural Forum, Scheman Building.

March 1: Proposal deadline, ISU computer-based instruction projects, 138 Curtiss

March 3-4: "The Science and Controversy of Agricultural GMOs," ISU conference, Scheman Building.

March 7-8: "Agriculture and the Environment: A Wake-Up Call for Iowans," ISU water quality conference, Scheman Building.

March 9: Summit on Agricultural Education, State Historical Building.

.......................................................................

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

.......................................................................

PRINT IS THE PERFECT PLACE FOR BIG IDEAS

A quote from an anonymous source on printed communications and publications, which appeared recently in the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development’s newsletter: "When you start with print, you learn the only thing that counts is the idea. If the idea is strong, print makes it stronger. On the other hand, in print, you can't hide the lack of an idea. Print is the perfect medium for the best writers -- and a great place for big ideas."

...................................................

I N F O G R A Z I N G

...................................................

TOP TEN OLDEST AG-RELATED BUILDINGS AT ISU

According to the ISU Office of Institutional Research, here the oldest buildings containing agriculture-related departments or programs on the ISU campus, by date of occupancy. (The list excludes federal buildings, farm buildings and some small buildings.)

1906 - East Hall

1909 - Curtiss Hall

1915 - Horticulture Hall and Greenhouse

1916 - Science Hall

1922 - Davidson Hall

1928 (and 1962, 1991, 1993) - Food Sciences (Dairy Industry)

1928 - Insectary and Greenhouse

1933 - Genetics Laboratory

1939 - Snedecor Hall

1952 (and 1986) - Agronomy Hall

...................................................

I N T E R N A L V O I C E S

...................................................

PROVOST: WHO WILL PROVIDE FUTURE DISTANCE EDUCATION COURSES?

Distance education was one topic discussed at last month’s College of Agriculture open forum with Provost Richmond. He expressed concern about competition from private companies in providing distance education courses. He cited examples of companies spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to develop and market single courses. Some distance-education companies are headed by former academics. He said ISU must have a strong presence in distance education, and should work with industry to develop markets for courses. He said some markets may be international, in places like China or India where ISU has developed collaborative programs.

...................................................

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

...................................................

CONDITION OF UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION, 1999

"At the postsecondary level, many are concerned about the quality of undergraduate education, but national data on change are limited. Undergraduate students are exposed to senior faculty in at least half of their courses, a proportion that is similar across all types of four-year institutions. Full-time faculty are spending more time in the classroom teaching students and less time on related activities such as grading papers, preparing for class or advising students." From the Condition of Education 1999, a report by the National Center for Educational Statistics (http://nces.ed.gov/pubs99/condition99/index.html).

...................................................

M A R G I N A L I A

...................................................

THE FUTURE IS NOW FOR HIGH-TECH UNDERWEAR

Thanks to a breakthrough in textile technology, it’s now possible to wear socks and underwear for days and still smell fresh as a daisy. The technology is similar to that used to infuse fabric with chemicals to resist wrinkling, except in this case the N-halamine chemical compound includes chlorine atoms, which prevent the growth of bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms. The new treatment can be used on cotton and cotton-polyester blend fabrics, and can by "recharged" by periodic rewashing in a bleach solution. The first products, which will appear in 2000, will be socks, athletic clothing, towels and dishcloths. Future uses will be in hospital gowns and bed sheets, and in kitchen equipment, such as wooden cutting boards and countertops. (San Jose Mercury News, Aug. 24, 1999)

........................................................

AG ONLINE

........................................................

NEXT ISSUE: Feb. 18 DEADLINE: Feb. 16

Share