Issue: 134

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AG ONLINE

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The College of Agriculture Faculty/Staff Newsletter

Iowa State University

December 3, 1999 No. 134

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C O N T E N T S

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COLLEGE NEWS

- Open forum for final dean candidate on Dec. 7

- Game day tomorrow, sponsored by College of Ag

- National summit on private land conservation Dec. 7

- Display on riparian project at national summit

- Still room for farm families in Ag-Link program Dec. 10

- Convocation for graduating seniors on Dec. 18

- College strategic plan group meets next on Jan. 12

- Twenty percent of ag freshmen in learning communities

- Where the students are: top ten areas of study

- Think Tank on Animal Ag meets again Monday

- Project BIO team invited back to Egypt for workshops

- College awards 344 scholarships for ‘99-’00

- Shockwave software program Dec. 8 in Brenton Center

- Forestry Club selling Christmas trees

- Still a chance to buy a poinsettia

- New student officers for Ag Council

- Mother Nature says nuts to squirrels

- Science Bowl looking for volunteers

- Deadlines & Reminders

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Steps to leave a more effective voice-mail message

INFOGRAZING

- Where are all the Big Men on Campus?

- Where the men are at Iowa State

- Federal budget snapshot on research funds

- Pell Grants, other student programs may get boost

INTERNAL VOICES

- Interdisciplinary programs encourage students

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Make the undertake sorry: three quotes from Twain

MARGINALIA

- O Christmas tree, you blaze without electricity

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C O L L E G E N E W S

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OPEN FORUM FOR FINAL DEAN CANDIDATE ON DEC. 7

The open forum for Alan Bennett, the last of seven finalists for the position of dean of agriculture, will be held Tuesday, Dec. 7, at 3 p.m. in the Ensminger Room, 1204 Kildee. Bennett is associate dean of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California, Davis.

GAME DAY TOMORROW, SPONSORED BY COLLEGE OF AG

Tomorrow, Saturday, Dec. 4, the College of Agriculture will be the sponsoring college for the ISU women's basketball game against Western Illinois. All faculty, staff and students are welcome to attend. Tickets for faculty and staff are $1, and students’ are free. A pre-game spirit rally with refreshments will begin at 11 a.m. at the Stagedoor in the Scheman Building. Student clubs will compete for prizes with their banners and skits. The game begins at 1 p.m. At halftime, ag student clubs will be introduced.

NATIONAL SUMMIT ON PRIVATE LAND CONSERVATION DEC. 7

The National Summit on Private Land Conservation will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 7, in the Great Hall, Memorial Union. The summit concludes a series of regional forums held to assess what new directions the USDA should take in its conservation and forestry policies and programs. USDA Secretary Dan Glickman will participate. The public is invited to attend. There is no charge. Registration begins at 8 a.m. For more information: Larry Biles, USDA-CSREES national program leader for forestry, lbiles@reeusda.gov, or check the Web: http://www.nhq.nrcs.usda.gov/CCS/forums.html

DISPLAY ON RIPARIAN PROJECT AT NATIONAL SUMMIT

At the National Summit on Private Land Conservation on Tuesday, the Department of Forestry will have a display on ISU’s award-winning Bear Creek riparian buffer demonstration project. Larry Biles, USDA-CSREES national program leader for forestry, also will visit the forestry department on Monday, Dec. 6.

STILL ROOM FOR FARM FAMILIES IN AG-LINK PROGRAM DEC. 10

The Ag-Link seminar on Dec. 10 has room for three more farm families. If faculty or staff know juniors or seniors who plan to return to the farm, let them know about the program. Students must be registered by Tuesday, Dec. 7. For the past six years, Ag-Link has helped students and their families make the transition into intergenerational farming. The Dec. 10 session will cover estate and tax planning, communications and other topics. Ag-Link is organized by the agricultural education and studies department, the Beginning Farmer Center and ISU Extension. For more information: Lynn Jones, 4-0898 or x1jones@iastate.edu.

CONVOCATION FOR GRADUATING SENIORS ON DEC. 18

The college’s convocation to recognize graduating seniors will be held at 9 a.m., Saturday, Dec. 18, in C.Y. Stephens Auditorium.

COLLEGE STRATEGIC PLAN GROUP MEETS NEXT ON JAN. 12

Faculty and staff are invited to the next meeting of the college’s strategic plan committee on Jan. 12 in the Sun Room, Memorial Union, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

TWENTY PERCENT OF AG FRESHMEN IN LEARNING COMMUNITIES

Learning communities can help make the transition from high school to college smoother for students. This fall there are 332 College of Agriculture students participating in learning communities. While most are freshmen, there also are 17 upperclassmen taking part. Twenty percent (315) of all agriculture freshmen are in learning communities this year.

WHERE THE STUDENTS ARE: TOP TEN AREAS OF STUDY

This fall the top College of Agriculture areas of undergraduate study are: animal science (443 students); agricultural business (376); animal ecology (303); horticulture (283); agricultural studies (240); agronomy (213); animal science/pre-vet (158); agricultural systems technology (140); agricultural education (131); and forestry (116). (ISU Annual Statistical Report, Fall 1999)

THINK TANK ON ANIMAL AG MEETS AGAIN MONDAY

Animal science professor Steven Nissen will speak on development of a university-wide animal research initiative at the next Think Tank on Animal Agriculture meeting. It will be held Monday, Dec. 6, in the Cardinal Room, Memorial Union, with a social time at 6 p.m. and dinner at 6:30 p.m. The meal is $11, payable at the door. To register, e-mail Don Beitz at dcbeitz@iastate.edu or call Jane Linn, 4-2063. The think tank is a series of forums examining future issues in animal agriculture. For more information: Beitz or Gene Freeman, 4-3352 or genef@iastate.edu.

PROJECT BIO TEAM INVITED BACK TO EGYPT FOR WORKSHOPS

Building on the success the Web-based Project BIO had last April in educating Arab biology teachers, ISU faculty in the program were invited back to Egypt in November to deliver two workshops. One session was for women faculty, showing how to develop and teach a science or engineering course on the Web. The other was a follow-up for biology faculty who attended the April workshop, which attracted 23 instructors representing 16 universities in 13 Arab countries. The sessions were sponsored by Cairo's UNESCO office and Suez Canal University in Egypt; and ISU’s International Institute of Theoretical & Applied Physics and Project BIO. Tom Ingebritsen, John Pleasants and Doug Bull made up the Project BIO team. Project BIO’s goal is to develop and share biology education resources via the Internet.

COLLEGE AWARDS 344 SCHOLARSHIPS FOR ‘99-’00

For 1999-2000, the College of Agriculture awarded 344 scholarships totaling $325,146. These included 65 freshmen scholarships, $73,989; 252 upperclassmen scholarships, $219,157; 21 transfer student scholarships, $21,000; and six graduate student scholarships, $11,000. These figures don’t include departmental and university scholarships.

SHOCKWAVE SOFTWARE PROGRAM DEC. 8 IN BRENTON CENTER

Director 7 Shockwave Software, which is used to develop CD-ROM and Web-based materials, will be discussed at the Brenton Center’s professional development program, Wednesday, Dec. 8, at noon in 8 Curtiss. For more information: Richard Carter, Brenton Center, 4-6950 or ricarter@iastate.edu.

FORESTRY CLUB SELLING CHRISTMAS TREES

The Forestry Club has begun its annual Christmas tree sales. Fresh-cut, Iowa-grown white pine and Scotch pine trees are available. Cost for all trees is four dollars per foot. Pre-cut trees will be sold at Reiman Gardens on Dec. 3-5 and Dec. 10-12. Hours are 4 to 7 p.m. on Dec. 3 and 10; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Dec. 4 and 11; and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Dec. 5 and 12. If you want to cut your own tree, you can go to the Forestry Club plantation Dec. 10-12. Call 4-1167 for hours. Directions to the plantation: go north on Scholl Road off of Ontario and turn onto the second road to the right.

STILL A CHANCE TO BUY A POINSETTIA

If you missed the Horticulture Club’s poinsettia sale this week, you still may have a chance to pick one up. While supplies last, you can buy poinsettias by calling the horticulture department, 4-2751. Three sizes are available: 4-inch for $5, 6-inch for $8, and 8-inch for $14. The club has four colors to choose from: red, white, marble and dark pink.

NEW STUDENT OFFICERS FOR AG COUNCIL

New Ag Council officers for 2000 are: president Brian Wischmeier, junior, agricultural studies; vice president Brian Pitzen, senior, agricultural systems technology; secretary Dave Reddel, junior, agronomy; and treasurer Scott Metzger, sophomore, dairy science.

MOTHER NATURE SAYS NUTS TO SQUIRRELS

This year's acorn crop was almost nonexistent. It's not unusual for one species of oak tree to fail to produce acorns, but this year most of Iowa's oak species didn't produce, says Paul Wray, forestry professor. He says the shortage means direct seeding of acorns won't be an option this year and may lead to a shortage of oak seedlings for the next couple of years. Jim Pease, professor of animal ecology, says the acorn shortage is bad news for squirrels, bluejays, wood ducks and other Iowa wildlife for which acorns are a major source of food.

SCIENCE BOWL LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS

The Ames Lab is looking for volunteers to help at the tenth annual Science Bowl quiz competition for 48 high-school teams on Jan. 29, in the Memorial Union. Volunteers are needed for moderators, judges, scorekeepers and timekeepers. Volunteers receive a free T-shirt, lunch and parking in the Union ramp. For more information: Saren Johnston, 4-3474 or johnstons@ameslab.gov.

DEADLINES & REMINDERS

Dec. 7: Open forum, Alan Bennett, dean candidate, 1204 Kildee, 3 p.m.

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C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

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STEPS TO LEAVE A MORE EFFECTIVE VOICE-MAIL MESSAGE

The following reminders of voice-mail etiquette were published in the Writing That Works newsletter: Take your time. Fight the urge to rush through your message. Speak clearly. Identify yourself at the beginning and unless you’re close to the person you’re calling, slowly spell your name. Give the name of your company or organization. Leave a complete message related to what you are seeking. Repeat your name and slowly spell it again. Give your number slowly, and repeat it.

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I N F O G R A Z I N G

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FEDERAL BUDGET SNAPSHOT FOR RESEARCH FUNDS

The federal budget that was signed into law last month increased funds for agricultural research by 3.8 percent to $1.7 billion. The National Research Initiative will be funded at the same level as last year, $119 million. Clinton attempted to fund the NRI using money from a Hatch Act formula-based grant program that provides research funds for land-grant institutions, but Congress continued to fund that program at the previous year’d level. The budget for CSREES was increased 3.3 percent to $955 million. What may affect these numbers is a Congressional proposal for a 0.38 across-the-board budget cut, which is still under debate. (Chronicle for Higher Education, Nov. 26)

PELL GRANTS, OTHER STUDENT PROGRAMS MAY GET BOOST

The Pell Grant program for needy college students may benefit from a compromise in federal budget negotiations. The deal, if approved, includes a provision to raise the maximum Pell Grant by $175 to $3,300. The House approved the measure and has sent it to the Senate. The bill also has other increases for educational programs: $64 million more for the Federal Work-Study Program; $12 million for the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program; $15 million for the Leveraging Assistance Partnership (formerly the State Student Incentive Grant Program); and $45 million for TRIO programs for minority and disadvantaged students. (Chronicle for Higher Education, Nov. 26)

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I N T E R N A L V O I C E S

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INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS ENCOURAGE STUDENTS

"The fact that Iowa State encourages interdisciplinary work has been very good to me. It has allowed me to do research in both the biological and the mathematical sciences. Now that bioinformatics and related areas are flourishing, I hope that many more students will take advantage of the many ways in which Iowa State encourages and facilitates the collaboration between disciplines." Soledad Fernandez, a Ph.D. student in statistics and animal science, speaking at the Plant Sciences Institute’s inaugural colloquium in October.

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E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

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MAKE THE UNDERTAKER SORRY: THREE QUOTES FROM TWAIN

In honor of the Nov. 30 birthday of Samuel Clemens, a.k.a. Mark Twain (1835-1910), here are four of his quotations:

- "I have no color prejudices nor caste prejudices nor creed prejudices. All I care to know is that a man is a human being, and that is enough for me; he can't be any worse."

- "Where prejudice exists it always discolors our thoughts."

- "Let us endeavor so to live that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry."

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M A R G I N A L I A

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O CHRISTMAS TREE, YOU BLAZE WITHOUT ELECTRICITY

Time to drag out the lights and start stringing them on the tree. If it’s all too much, take a look at the research some University of Hertfordshire students are working on. Five graduate students entered a competition to breed a Douglas spruce with genes from fluorescent jellyfish and fireflies. Neurophysiology student Katy Presland says the result would be a "green luminescent Christmas tree that glows in the dark and produces a noticeable light during the day." (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 26)

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AG ONLINE

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NEXT ISSUE: Dec. 17 DEADLINE: Dec. 16

EDITORS

Brian Meyer, bmeyer@iastate.edu

Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu

Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

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Ag Online, the newsletter for faculty and staff in Iowa State University’s College of Agriculture, is e-mailed every other Friday. To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and the message "Ag Online subscribe" to bmeyer@iastate.edu. To unsubscribe, send "Ag Online unsubscribe."

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