Issue: 13

COLLEGE NEWS

- International programs director named

- Report on strategic plan complete

- Executive associate dean forums

- Nominations for associate deans

- Brenton Center professor-in-charge

- More Brenton Center staff

- Vision workshop March 9

- Vision 2020 video available

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- But, seriously

INFOGRAZING

- Biotech product pipeline

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Education key to rural workplace . . .

- . . . and to future of U.S. food, fiber

MARGINALIA

- Lost and found

C O L L E G E N E W S

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS DIRECTOR NAMED

David Acker has been named director of Agricultural International

Programs for the College of Agriculture. Acker, director of the

Office of International Research and Development at Oregon State

University, has 18 years of experience managing international

programs. He will start his duties in July or August.

REPORT ON STRATEGIC PLAN COMPLETE

The College Planning Advisory Committee today (Friday) released

its report on strategic issues for the College of Agriculture

and suggestions for addressing them in the next five years. The

50-page report, "Entering the 21st Century - Planning for

Progress," will be used in discussions of a strategic plan

for the college. Dean Topel or committee chair Mike Chaplain plan

to meet with every group that provided input to the report. A

college townhall meeting and meetings around the state also will

be scheduled. The target for completing the college's strategic

plan is this fall. Copies of the report may be picked up at the

Horticulture Department office, 110 Horticulture, or Ag Information,

304 Curtiss.

EXECUTIVE ASSOCIATE DEAN FORUMS

Open forums are set for the three candidates for the College of

Agriculture's executive associate dean position. Candidates and

forums are: Colin Scanes, Rutgers University, 3:15 p.m., Thursday,

March 9; Dennis LeMaster, Purdue University, 1 p.m., Tuesday,

March 14; and Michael Chaplin, Iowa State University, 11 a.m.,

Monday, March 20. All forums will be held in 1951 Food Sciences

Building.

NOMINATIONS FOR ASSOCIATE DEANS

The search committee for the three associate dean positions in

the college is still accepting applications. The positions are:

associate dean for national programs, associate dean for state

programs and associate dean for industry programs. If you'd like

to submit a nomination, contact Michael Chaplin, 294-3718.

BRENTON CENTER PROFESSOR-IN-CHARGE

Wade Miller has been named professor-in-charge of the Brenton

Center for Agricultural Instruction and Technology Transfer. Miller,

a professor of agricultural education and studies, will lead Brenton

Center programs to help faculty and staff use new technology in

classes and other educational programs. He has expertise in instructional

methods and conducts research in instructional technology. He

also was chair of the articulation committee, coordinating efforts

by all departments in the college and Iowa's community colleges.

Miller will continue teaching, research and outreach activities

in the department.

MORE BRENTON CENTER STAFF

Five others will have assignments in the Brenton Center: David

Doerfert, coordinator, off-campus programs; Helen Olson, off-campus

program adviser; Patti Wright, secretary; and Allan Schmidt and

Kevin Koester, video specialists.

VISION WORKSHOP MARCH 9

Vision 2020, the effort to envision the future for food systems

and education at ISU and Iowa community colleges, will hold an

ISU Vision Workshop, Thursday, March 9, 1-4 p.m., 101 Carver.

Registration is required. Contact the Vision 2020 office, 294-2092.

VISION 2020 VIDEO

What is Vision 2020? A videotape describing the program and its

goals is available. Contact Karen Lind, 294-2092.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

BUT, SERIOUSLY

The word "but" can negate what you hoped would be a

positive statement. "This is very nice, but I think it contains

too much jargon." "That's an interesting idea, but won't

it be expensive?" "I appreciate your hard work, but

I'm afraid you've missed the point." "I'd like to help,

but my hands are tied." If the first part of the statement

is sincere, say it -- even better, amplify it. Then, instead of

"but," ask questions and discuss what steps might be

or must be taken. Beware the three-letter word. Tip from Ag Information.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

BIOTECH PRODUCT PIPELINE

Genetically engineered products awaiting various government approvals

include altered-oil-composition canola; herbicide-resistant cotton

and soybean; delayed-ripening and thicker-skinned tomatoes; insect-resistant

cotton and potato; virus-resistant squash; enhanced nitrogen-fixing

bacteria (to boost alfalfa yield); and a virus vaccine to control

rabies in raccoons. A delayed-ripening tomato and an insect-controlling

soil bacterium are on the market. (The Gene Exchange, December

1994)

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

EDUCATION KEY TO RURAL WORKPLACE . . .

Information technology now allows employees to work and live in

rural areas instead of cities. Rural communities must supply the

infrastructure needed to support computerized work environments,

including educational systems that are "doing the right things,"

said Allan Van Thomme, associate director of information systems,

Principal Financial Group. "This doesn't mean teaching computers

and programming. It means teaching people how to think, write

and communicate -- the kinds of things people will need to work

in this kind of environment." Van Thomme spoke this week

at the 1995 National Forum for Agriculture.

. . . AND TO FUTURE OF U.S. FOOD, FIBER

"U.S. food and fiber systems form a fabric that touches every

part of our lives. The strength of that fabric then becomes an

important issue to us all . . . There are more jobs (now) in agribusiness

than there are college graduates to fill them . . . High schools

are simply not preparing students for careers in agricultural

sciences and related areas. That means the fabric of our food

and fiber systems is likely to be stretched and perhaps torn in

the future as we in agribusiness strive to meet the needs and

demands of society." -- Charles Johnson, executive vice president,

Pioneer Hi-Bred International, at a meeting this week on the future

of agriculture in the classroom, which included representatives

from the College of Agriculture, Des Moines Public Schools, the

National FFA Organization and other agribusinesses.

M A R G I N A L I A

LOST AND FOUND

A study by Magnavox reveals that more than half of Americans lose

their TV remote between 1 and 5 times a week, while a tenth misplace

it 6 to 10 times. Sixty-three percent spend 5 minutes searching

for it; 16 percent hunt 10 minutes. Most find it hiding in the

furniture or in a nearby room. Six percent say they usually find

it in the fridge. (Newsweek, Oct. 3, 1994)

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