Issue: 11

COLLEGE NEWS

- Faculty-staff workshop Feb. 28

- Odor lawsuit appeal

- New Ag Council officers

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Pocketful of ISU facts

INFOGRAZING

- Plant Health Clinic '94

- Agriculture, aerospace, copyrights

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Tomorrow's jobs . . .

- . . . Jobs tomorrow?

MARGINALIA

- Licking a problem

- Whistleblower

C O L L E G E N E W S

FACULTY-STAFF WORKSHOP FEB. 28

More details on the upcoming College of Agriculture professional

development workshop: Faculty and staff are encouraged to attend

"Human Resources: Enhancing the Professional Work Environment

in the College of Agriculture," Tuesday, Feb. 28, Scheman

Building, 5:00-8:30 p.m. with a light supper at 6:30. The workshop

focuses on sexual harassment and diversity issues. Participation

will satisfy the university requirement that all faculty and staff

receive training in these areas. Note: Managers and supervisors

are welcome, but they'll also be required to attend a special

workshop on these issues. Reservation forms (return deadline,

Feb. 17) have been sent to departments. Questions? Contact Robert

Martin, 294-0896.

ODOR LAWSUIT APPEAL

Last week the Iowa Court of Appeals rejected four Boone County

residents' appeal of a 1993 district court decision involving

ISU. The district court had ordered ISU to pay the residents $5,000

each for damages resulting from odors from the Swine Nutrition

and Management Center. The residents appealed, seeking the more

than $1 million in damages they had asked for in their original

lawsuit.

NEW AG COUNCIL OFFICERS

College of Agriculture Student Council officers serving this semester

and the next are Colby Entriken, horticulture, president; Ryan

Bailey, agronomy, vice president; Deanne Dennison, ag education,

treasurer; and Brian Eipers, ag engineering, secretary.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

POCKETFUL OF ISU FACTS

Need quick, concise information about ISU for visiting groups

or as a personal reference? "How It Works, 1994-95"

is a pocket-size brochure of current facts and figures, important

phone numbers, undergrad academic costs and more. Copies are available

by calling ISU's News Service, 294-4777, with the quantity you

need and how they will be used.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

PLANT DISEASE CLINIC '94

In 1994, the Plant Disease Clinic in the Department of Plant Pathology

received 2,843 plant samples and 1,055 phone inquiries. The clinic

diagnoses plant problems and suggests management strategies for

homeowners, commercial growers and Extension personnel. Trees

accounted for 49 percent of the samples. The clinic also received

553 soil samples for soybean cyst nematode (SCN) testing. Four

counties were added to the list of those known to have SCN infestations;

the total is now 64. Specialists in several departments routinely

contribute to diagnoses of problems submitted to the clinic.

AGRICULTURE, AEROSPACE, COPYRIGHTS

U.S. copyright industries have foreign sales of $36 billion annually

-- a figure exceeded only by the agricultural and aerospace industries.

Copyright industries account for nearly 6 percent of the nation's

GNP and are creating new jobs at three times the national average,

says the International Intellectual Property Alliance. (Wall Street

Journal, Jan. 25)

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

TOMORROW'S JOBS . . .

Reengineering (radical redesign of a company's processes, organization

and culture to dramatically improve performance) squeezes out

work that's nonvalue-adding, say "Reengineering the Corporation"

authors Michael Hammer and James Champy. "If you can't do

real work, I'd get real nervous . . . A successful career will

. . . be about mastery," says Hammer. They add that the few

remaining managerial jobs will be the process planner, who figures

out how; the coach, who teaches and helps people improve; and

the leader, who creates an environment where people get work done.

(Wall Street Journal, Jan. 24)

. . . JOBS TOMORROW?

Skill requirements of the emerging workplace

are more general than specific, crossing traditional disciplinary

lines and leaning much more towards flexibility and resiliency

than to the rigid norms of the traditional "job," says

William Bridges, author of "JobShift." He says the job

is poorly adapted to the needs of a fast-moving, information-based

economy and has outlived its usefulness. Many organizations are

moving toward being "dejobbed" -- meaning job definitions

go out the window and workers' tasks and responsibilities evolve

as projects evolve. (Fortune, Sept. 19, 1994)

M A R G I N A L I A

LICKING A PROBLEM

Canada spreads 4 million tons of salt a year on snowy roads, creating

a big salt lick for moose and, in turn, a moose hazard for drivers.

To keep moose off roads, researchers tested repellents redolent

of wolf urine or rotten eggs. But moose got used to the odors.

Digging drainage ditches to divert salty water reduced accidents,

but is costly and time-consuming. Bumper whistles claiming to

alert moose of approaching vehicles are popular, but "after

people finished picking the moose hair out of their car grill,

they realized they didn't work very well." (Wall Street Journal)

GAME OVER, MAN

Now there's a software program that literally blows the whistle

when it senses an employee playing a computer game on company

time. GameCop can be programmed to recognize more than 100 games.

(Information Week, Jan. 30)

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