Issue: 1

COLLEGE NEWS

- College strategic plan

- Tent-a-Gate with ag alumni

- Administrative changes

- Experiment Station milestone

COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK

- Feedback

INFOGRAZING

- TROL for math-science-tech resources

- Multicultural ag student program

EXTERNAL VOICES

- Seven guiding personal principles

- Top five skills for ag grads

MARGINALIA

- Say it with a smiley

W E L C O M E T O A G O N L I N E !

Welcome to the first issue of Ag Online, a twice-a-month

electronic newsletter for faculty and staff in the College of

Agriculture at Iowa State University.

We hope Ag Online will be one way to help faculty and staff be

well-informed about the college -- and be effective participants

in the college. Ag Online will provide news on what's going on

at

the college level. We hope that some information in the newsletter

will help faculty and staff with situations that come up every

day

. . . computer troubleshooting tips, what to do when a news

reporter calls, managing stress or other topics.

Ag Online will include digests of timely issues of importance

to

the college, whether they be in education, science and technology,

communications or other areas. We will list contracts and grants

awarded within the college as well as papers accepted for

publication in refereed journals, new titles of ISU Extension

publications, software, etc. And we plan to sprinkle in bits and

pieces that'll be interesting, thought-provoking or just fun.

That's the kind of resource we want Ag Online to be. We don't

want

it to divert attention from publications that serve the entire

university community, and do not plan to list honors,

achievements, seminars, calendars and other items that are covered

elsewhere.

We welcome comments about Ag Online. Send them to

bmeyer@iastate.edu

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE (OR SPOT US IN CYBERSPACE)

Since there's no comprehensive list of College of Agriculture

e-

mail addresses, we're asking people to subscribe to Ag Online.

This first issue is being e-mailed to distribution lists that

do

exist, including department, center and extension offices. We

ask

that these offices forward this issue to their local e-mail

addresses. A flyer about Ag Online also will be sent through

campus mail.

To subscribe, send your name, e-mail address and

the message "Ag Online subscribe" to bmeyer@iastate.edu

(or if

you're on the College of Agriculture server, send to

AGCOLLEGE/BMEYER).

Ag Online also will be posted on the Internet, in the College

of

Agriculture directory in the World Wide Web system. The college's

home page can be found through your Web client (i.e., Mosaic,

MacWeb, WinWeb,

Mosaic for Windows, etc.). Open URL and enter the following address:

http://aghelp.exnet.iastate.edu

C O L L E G E N E W S

COLLEGE STRATEGIC PLAN REPORT DUE SOON

The College Planning Advisory Committee (C-PAC) will deliver its

first strategic planning report to the dean in October or

November. "When the report is finished, there will be another

round of discussion about its recommendations. We're aiming for

substantial agreement on goals for the next five years,"

said Mike

Chaplin, committee chairman.

The challenge is narrowing a strategic plan down to a manageable

number of issues, he added. For example, there are issues in

undergraduate and graduate education; the college's role in

changing agricultural systems and rural communities; research

and

extension priorities; international programs; protection of

natural resources; our relationship with other public and private

organizations; and consumer needs and preferences.

"Our final report will only be final as far as C-PAC's activities

are concerned," Chaplin said. "In practice the report

will become

a working document that guides us but doesn't confine us."

TENT-A-GATE WITH AG ALUMNI SEPT. 17

Faculty and staff are invited to visit with ag alumni at Tent-a-

Gate, the College of Agriculture Alumni Society's annual tent

party/tailgater. The event will be held before the ISU-Western

Michigan football game, Sept. 17, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The

society's two tents will be set up east of the Olsen Building,

just north of Cyclone Stadium. The Iowa Pork Producers will serve

a barbecue meal. Meal tickets are available for $5 -- call Roger

Bruene, 54725.

Also, the newest Ag Alumni Forum, the annual publication of the

ISU College of Agriculture Alumni Society, is available from Ag

Information Services. For a copy, contact Marty Behrens, 5

5616 or mbehrens@iastate.edu.

RECENT COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES

Gerald Klonglan will serve as interim associate dean and interim

associate director of the Experiment Station after the departure

of Tom Fretz, who leaves this month to become dean of the College

of Agriculture at the University of Maryland.

Nolan Hartwig is interim associate dean of ISU Extension for the

college, replacing Jerald DeWitt, who is now state specialist

for

sustainable agriculture. DeWitt also is co-leader, with Klonglan,

of Vision 2020, the Kellogg Grant-funded project to examine the

future of land-grant universities in the next 25 years.

Dianne Draper was named assistant director of the Experiment

Station for the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.

Susan Lamont is a new assistant director of the Experiment

Station, replacing Max Rothschild, who returns full-time to the

animal science department after four years in the position.

Lamont, an animal science professor, divides her time between

administration and animal science teaching and research.

Cornelia Flora is director of the North Central Regional Center

for Rural Development, replacing Peter Korsching, who returns

to

teaching and research in the sociology department after 10 years

in the position.

New department executive officers include Willis Goudy, chair

of

sociology, and Arne Hallam, interim chair of economics. John

Miranowski will become the new economics chair on Jan. 9.

PAPER-TRAIL MILESTONE FOR EXPERIMENT STATION

The Experiment Station reached a milestone on August 29 with the

authorization of its 16,000th journal paper. J-16000 was "Elm

leaf

beetles have greatly reduced levels of gene diversity" by

E.S.

Krafsur and Pramoda Nariboli. Complete records on authorized

papers have been kept since July 8, 1938, when J-569 ("New

smut

and rust resistant oats from Markton crosses," F.A. Coffman)

was

issued. Recently, there's been a considerable increase in research

paper production. For example, J-15000 was authorized on July

7,

1992, showing an average of about 500 papers authorized per year.

C O M M U N I C A T I O N S K I O S K

KEEP GETTING BETTER: GET FEEDBACK

Encourage informal feedback from faculty, staff and students

through conversations, memos, letters, phone calls, e-mails and

meetings. But also ensure more formal regular feedback. This

includes course evaluations, readership studies, exit interviews,

surveys, advisory groups, program evaluations, focus groups, etc.

Feedback usually contains some surprises -- and surprises usually

mean learning.

I N F O G R A Z I N G

MATH-SCIENCE-TECH RESOURCES TO SHARE? TRY TROL

The Master's Network is a teacher resource project directed by

Seattle Pacific University. Its goal is to enhance teaching and

learning of math, science and technology in Washington State.

The

network provides TROL (Teaching Resources On Line) for Math-

Science-Technology, a catalog database designed to provide

Washington State's K-12 teachers with easy access to resources

available statewide and across the nation. This fall, TROL will

be

available to educators directly through Internet or by calling

a

toll-free number. If you'd like to share information on resources

provided by your organization, contact Ray Myers, director,

Master's Network TROL, Box 71, Seattle Pacific University, 3307

Third Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119; phone 22504, fax

206-

281-2756.

MULTICULTURAL SCHOLARS PROGRAM

USDA CSRS requests proposals for competitive grants under its

Higher Education Multicultural Scholars Program. Grants will be

awarded for undergraduate multicultural scholarships to meet

national needs for training food and agricultural scientists and

professionals. Scholarship recipients will be selected by the

colleges and universities receiving project grant awards. About

30-40 grants, averaging $50,000 each, will be made in fiscal year

1995. These will support between 80-120 scholars at about 20

colleges. Deadline for submitting proposals: Sept. 16, 1994. For

a

copy of the Application Kit and Program Announcement, contact

Proposal Services Branch, Awards Management Division, CSRS,

USDA,

Room 303, Aerospace Center, Ag Box 2245, Washington, DC 20250-

2245; phone 25048.

E X T E R N A L V O I C E S

TOP FIVE SKILLS THAT EMPLOYERS LOOK FOR

The College of Agriculture at University of Nevada, Reno, asked

employers in agribusiness and the food industry (140 in 38 states

and Canada) to rate the five most important areas of knowledge

for

agriculture grads. The top five: 1) business and economics, 89

percent; 2) communications skills, 88 percent; 3)

management/administration, 76 percent; 4) production agriculture,

73 percent; 5) computer science, 54 percent. Number six was

science/biology, mentioned by 20 percent of respondents.

SEVEN GUIDING PERSONAL PRINCIPLES

The following list, "Some guiding personal principles,"

was

outlined by Thayne R. Dutson, dean of the College of Agricultural

Sciences at Oregon State University and director of the Oregon

Agricultural Experiment Station, in a September 1993 draft of

a

strategic planning document for the college:

- Decisions are built from the ground up.

- It is more important to develop cooperative solutions than to

win negotiations.

- Stick to your word.

- Seek the positive interpretation of situations.

- Try to understand the long-term consequences of a decision --

before making it.

- It is tough to get anything done without taking risks.

- One does not need to manage every detail of a system, but it

is

important to have a pretty good understanding of the system and

why it is there.

M A R G I N A L I A

SAY IT WITH A SMILEY: EMOTICONS

Emoticons are cryptic little codes used to convey the spirit in

which a line of text is typed -- for example, to indicate that

the

"snide" comment you just read was really a joke. They're

figures

created with keyboard symbols and used to express the emotions

of

normal voice communication. Some are funny, some bizarre. They

are

read with the head tilted to the left. Here's some examples:

Emoticon Meaning

-------- -------

:-o User is shocked

:-( Sad

:-< Real sad

>:-< Mad

8-| Suspense

|-) Hee hee

|-D Ho ho

:-I Hmm

:-O Uh oh

|-) User is asleep (boredom)

|-P Yuk!

:-s User after a BIZARRE comment

:-& User is tongue-tied

:-7 User after a wry statement

;-) Winking Smiley

,-} Wry and winking

:-p User is sticking tongue out (at you!)

:-| No expression face, 'that comment doesn't phase me'

:- Undecided user

#-) User partied all night

:-: User is mutant

*<|:-) User is Santa Claus (Ho Ho Ho)

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