Issue: 356

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COLLEGE NEWS
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WINTERSTEEN NAMED INTERIM AGRICULTURE DEAN
Wendy Wintersteen has been named interim dean of the College of Agriculture, effective Aug. 1. She also will become interim director of the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station. Wintersteen, senior associate dean of the college, succeeds Catherine Woteki, who has been dean since January 2002. Details: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2005/jul/wintersteen.shtml

NEARLY 250 ATTEND AG POLICY SUMMIT LAST WEEK
Last week's College of Agriculture-organized "Agricultural Policy Summit: New Directions in Federal Farm Policy" attracted 248 participants and 20 members of the news media. Speakers included Gov. Vilsack, Sen. Grassley, Rep. Latham, Rep. Boswell, Rep. King, Rep. Leach and staff members of Sen. Harkin and Rep. Nussle. A summary of the major themes explored at the conference will be developed and provided to policy-makers involved in national Farm Bill discussions.

IOWA FARMERS SUPPORT 2002 FARM BILL AS MODEL FOR 2007 BILL
The majority of Iowa farmers responding to an Iowa State University survey said the basic directions of the 2002 Farm Bill should be continued, the income protection it offers is adequate and overall, the program has been successful. The responses were summarized July 6 during the opening session of the farm policy summit. Learn more: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/2005releases/fbsurvey.html

RESEARCHER OBTAINS GENETIC MATERIAL TO STUDY SOYBEAN RUST
An Iowa State University plant scientist has returned from Brazil equipped with the genetic material necessary to study the molecular interaction between a soybean plant and the Asian rust fungus. Learn more: http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/releases/2005/jul/soybeanrust.shtml

SUMMARY ONLINE OF ISU WORK ON AIR QUALITY
A new summary of ISU research and extension in air quality was posted last week on the Animal Agriculture and Air Quality site on Extension's Ag and Natural Resources Web site. The summary was distributed to state commodity group representatives last week at the Dean's Executive Council meeting. The summary is listed as the first link on http://www.extension.iastate.edu/airquality/reports.html. The direct URL for the PDF is http://www.extension.iastate.edu/airquality/reports/isuaqsummary.pdf.

AG ENGINEERING CELEBRATION INCLUDES HISTORICAL SYMPOSIUM
A historical symposium at an international meeting is the next step in the centennial celebration for the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering. The symposium will be July 18. Details: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/news/2005releases/abecent2.html

MANURE MANAGEMENT CLINIC OFFERED
The Iowa Manure Management Action Group, in cooperation with ISU Extension and the College of Agriculture, is sponsoring a two-day manure management clinic Aug. 23-24 at the Field Extension Education Laboratory near Ames. Details:
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/news/2005/jul/070603.htm

ISU INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS ON EPA AGREEMENT THURSDAY
On Thursday, July 14, informational meetings on the EPA Air Quality Compliance Agreement will be held, sponsored by ISU Extension, Iowa Pork Industry Council and Iowa Pork Producers Association. Producers can learn about the agreement and about current and planned research on air emissions. IPPA attorney Eldon MacAfee will lead a discussion on the agreement and producers' options and responsibilities if they do sign the agreement. The meetings will be held at the Hamilton County Extension Office, Webster City, at 1:30 p.m. or the North Iowa Area Community College, Mason City, at 7 p.m.

ISU ALUM WELCOMED AS NEW EXECUTIVE VP OF CAST
Last Thursday, a welcome reception was held on campus for John Bonner, the ISU alumnus who is the new executive vice president for the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST). Dean Woteki and Iowa Agriculture Secretary Patty Judge were among the speakers at the reception. Bonner, who began his new duties on July 1, earned his B.S. in dairy science, his M.S. in animal production and his Ph.D. in nutrition physiology, all from Iowa State. For the past 15 years, he has worked for Land O'Lakes Purina Feed. For more information on CAST: http://www.cast-science.org/.

UNIVERSITY IT LEADERS PRESENT TO COLLEGE
Jim Davis, the university’s chief information officer, and Maury Hope, director of administrative technology services, made a presentation June 27 to College of Agriculture chairs, administration and staff about the reorganization of intellectual technology units. They also sought ways that Information Technology Services could work with the college to improve computing on campus. As of July 1, Administrative Technology Services merged with other university-wide IT service providers to form Information Technology Services. The PowerPoint presentation is available at: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/support/AgCollege-6-27-05.ppt

AMERICA’S HORSE TO FEATURE IOWA STATE BREEDING PROGRAM
Iowa State’s equine program will be featured on an upcoming episode of the television show, America’s Horse. In 2004, ISU became the second university to be honored with the American Quarter Horse Association’s Legacy Award. The television program will feature the history, challenges and triumphs of the breeding program. An association crew will be on campus Aug. 11 taping interviews with ISU faculty and students involved with the program. Peggy Miller-Auwerda, animal science and head of the equestrian program, and Scott McClure, veterinary clinical sciences, are among those to be featured in the segment. The show airs at 9 a.m. on Sundays on the TVG Network.

FLORA RECEIVES OUTSTANDING RESEARCH AWARD
Cornelia Flora, Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor of Agriculture in sociology and director of the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development, is the recipient of the 2005 Outstanding Research Award from the Community Development Society. Flora was honored at the group's annual meeting June 26-29 in Baltimore. The annual award recognizes research that has positively impacted communities. Flora's contributions include the development of sustainable agriculture in Peru, work with immigrant workers in the Midwest and helping communities identify and address problems. She also is an active member of the Women in Agriculture research group.

BUS AVAILABLE FOR SPECIAL TOURS JULY 27 AT ISU ARMSTRONG FARM
The College of Agriculture invites faculty and staff to attend the Armstrong Research Farm garden and field day tour on Wednesday, July 27. A bus is available to take people to the field day, which will leave Ames at 9:30 a.m. and return to Ames at 5 p.m. To reserve a seat (first come, first served), contact Sally Medford, 4-5045 or smedford@iastate.edu, by Friday, July 22. Bernie Havlovic, superintendent at the Armstrong Farm, will give a special tour of the ISU Demonstration Garden and and of the farm. The farm's annual garden field day is scheduled for that evening and is open to the public. The garden at the farm is most impressive and is the site of the 2006 All-American garden selections.

DEADLINES AND REMINDERS
July 11: Tod Murphy, CEO and founder of The Farmers Diner, speech, 3-5 p.m., Pioneer Room, Memorial Union, http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/news/newsreleases/2005/diner_062405.htm
July 12: Lauren Christian Pork Chop Open, Veenker Memorial Golf Course, Ames, more: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/news/2005/may/151101.htm
July 13-15: International Symposium on Genetics of Animal Health, Scheman Center, http://www.ans.iastate.edu/events/gah/GAH2005.html
Aug. 1: Deadline for Leopold Center pre-proposals in ecology, policy and marketing and food systems, 5 p.m., http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/research/rfp/2005.htm

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COMMUNICATIONS KIOSK
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WRITING READABLE REPORTS
Top executives don't have time to read lengthy reports, so an internal report should be less than two pages long, according to Jane Watson, business communication consultant. Defining the report’s purpose and audience should be the first step in writing the report. Short reports should follow a simple structure: an effective opening sentence, key points and a conclusion. Visual appeal also is important. Readers don't like to read solid gray blocks of type, so it's important to include white space, short paragraphs, subheads and bulleted items. (Writing that Works, March 2005)

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INFOGRAZING
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NPR STORY: CALLS GROW TO SUBSIDIZE GREEN FARMING
In the first of a two-part story that aired today (Monday) on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition, reporter Dan Charles examines federal farm subsidies. The federal government is expected to pay $24 billion in farm subsidies this year. Critics say more funds should go toward things that benefit the public, such as cleaner water and a healthier environment. For more information: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4735566

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MARGINALIA
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NEWS FLASH: TEENS' BRAINS ARE DIFFERENT . . . THANKS TO TECHNOLOGY
Well, we all knew it would happen -- we just didn't know it would happen this fast. The brains of teenagers born in 1982 and after – “millennials,” as they're dubbed by economist/historian Neil Howe -- are being "wired differently," thanks to their 24/7 multitasking habits that rotate an array of gadgets such as cell phones, music players, computers and personal organizers. "People's brains are different based on their experiences," says Alan Fiske, director of UCLA’s Center for Culture, Brain and Development. In fact, teens' love affair with technology has resulted in the astonishing statistic that 15-year-old girls are now the world's top consumers of computer chips, according to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing. "Teenagers have adopted this technology very aggressively, in part because it's inexpensive now, and it's mobile -- and everything a teenager does is about being mobile and untethered," says University of Connecticut clinical psychiatry professor David Greenfield. Instant messaging plays a major role in teens' social lives, facilitating communication among larger groups of peers than previously was possible. "Think about a kid who may be online IM-ing 10 other kids, each of them IM-ing 10 other kids," says the Kaiser Family Foundation's Victoria Rideout. "You've potentially got 100 kids in a social group more or less in instant communication." and that explains the brain change, says Fiske: "Humans presumably evolved in small face-to-face groups where people were together a lot and just talked to each other. At some level, any change in behavior indicates changes in the brain." (Los Angeles Times, June 23)

Next issue: July 18

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AG ONLINE
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EDITOR
Ed Adcock, edadcock@iastate.edu
Phone: (515) 294-5616 Web site: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/aginfo/

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